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Old March 10th, 2007, 07:41 PM   #21
k2h
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Mansur lands airport hotel

http://www.ibj.com/html/detail_page.asp?content=865
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Old March 10th, 2007, 09:48 PM   #22
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wow!!!!! that airport looks great. it makes me want to see milwaukee's airport rebuilt
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Old March 10th, 2007, 10:33 PM   #23
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Mansur lands airport hotel
$50 million-plus project at midfield terminal still faces design, financing, timing issues


The Indianapolis Airport Authority has tapped Mansur Real Estate Services Inc. to develop a $50 million-plus Westin hotel at the new midfield terminal. But the hotel’s final design may be one submitted by a former competitor.

Indianapolis-based Mansur was one of three groups to offer proposals last fall. White Lodging Corp. of South Bend wanted to build a Marriott, and Indianapolis’ KMI Realty Advisors Inc. pitched a Hilton for the site.

Project director John J. Kish said White Lodging has dropped out of the running, and the Airport Authority is working out a deal with Mansur. Raleigh, N.C.-based Concord Hospitality Enterprises Co. would be part owner and manage the operations.

“We thought their … financial plan was the most feasible,” Kish said.

Kish and Mansur President Charles R. Cagann declined to disclose the financial details, saying the project budget and any Airport Authority contributions are still under discussion. But Cagann did say the project likely will cost more than $50 million.

“I think this would be a predominantly privately financed project,” Cagann said. “What the discussion is about now is what condition the site will be delivered in. … We’ve made a specific proposal. They may have plenty to say about that.”

Hotel construction projects increasingly rely on public money to be viable, and one consultant thinks Mansur would need at least $10 million in assistance if the airport hotel comes in at $60 million.

With that level of aid, a four-star hotel connected to the terminal could succeed even though on-site lodging is unusual at a non-hub airport, said Rob Hunden, president of Chicago-based Hunden Strategic Partners Inc., a firm that consults on hotels and convention facilities.

Any project funding from the Airport Authority would come from its budget, composed of revenue from airport operations and some federal monies.

A subsidy totaling about 17 percent of the project cost would be slightly less than public incentives connected to other recent hotel projects. City officials awarded incentives equal to about 24 percent of the Conrad Indianapolis’ construction costs, and a draft agreement for a new convention center hotel promises contributions equal to almost 20 percent of those expenses.

White Lodging is among the developers collaborating on the $250 million convention center hotel complex, and KMI—a corporation owned by veteran local developer Al Kite—built the $100 million Conrad.

While Mansur is poised to lock up the airport hotel deal, Airport Authority members actually preferred White Lodging’s design proposal, which was developed by the Chicago office of St. Louis-based Hellmuth Obata & Kassabaum Inc. and locally based CSO Schenkel Shultz. The Authority is negotiating with that group’s architects to use its design.

Kish said White withdrew its airport hotel proposal after it won the city contract to build the 1,000-room convention hotel near Victory Field. Messages left with White officials were not returned.

Mansur proposed building a 250- to 300-room, four-star Westin, with the number of rooms dependent on final financing plans. It will have at least 15,000 square feet of meeting space, a full-service restaurant and bar, and concierge service. Average room rates will be about $150 a night.

The hotel will be situated directly in front of a five-level, 7,000-spot garage connected to the new airport terminal. As cars approach the airport, drivers will pass by the hotel on the way to the garage or ticketing.

Cagann said the project will take about 16 months to complete, so talks must be finalized by summer to get the hotel ready for the terminal’s late 2008 debut. But Kish said it’s still unclear whether the hotel and terminal will open simultaneously.

“I don’t know how likely that is at this point,” he said.

The Indianapolis Airport Authority, a government-appointed board that oversees six local airports, also is spearheading the $1 billion terminal project. That project does not include a subsidy for the hotel, but Authority members wanted a hotel to go along with the new terminal.

Nationwide, airport hotels do well, according to data provided by Hendersonville, Tenn.-based Smith Travel Research. Nationally, they enjoy about a 71-percent occupancy rate—better than the overall occupancy rate of 65 percent.

Occupancy near Indianapolis’ airport—an area that includes hotels in Speedway—was 57 percent in 2006, Smith Travel Research found. That compares with a 60-percent occupancy rate in the overall Indianapolis hotel market.

Even so, a 2004 report commissioned by the Airport Authority concluded that the market could support a meeting-focused hotel of at least 250 rooms. But offering more meeting space can cut into the bottom line, Hunden said.

A meeting-focused hotel for the Indianapolis airport might be a stretch, he said, because they’re still rare in non-hub cities.

Even around busier airports like Chicago Midway, he said, hotels are mostly limited-service brands like Hilton Garden Inn and Holiday Inn Express that offer only small, but well-booked, meeting rooms.

This isn’t Mansur’s first foray into hotel development. The company did a $40 million renovation and expansion of the 423-room Omni Severin Downtown Hotel in 1987, “back before anyone thought it was a good idea to have a hotel downtown,” Cagann said.

The group also was involved in the early site work for the Conrad Indianapolis before selling its interest, and assembled the property now occupied by the Hampton Inn Downtown. •


This is a great project for the aiprort. To me this says that the Airport Authority will really be aiming to get IND a hub for someone. The new facility is really a plan for the future. There is going to be a light rail station, the ability to nearly triple the size of the 2 concourses, and now this Westin that is not common for non-hub airports.

I love the design. It really makes the airport one cohesive project. I know it really isn't cutting edge and could be better, but I really like it. But my biggest complaint is that this project's design is being more scrutinized by decision makers than the convention center hotel. How can the Airport Authority understand the concept of a good design over a group that is supposed to be shapping how our downtown is developed????
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Old March 10th, 2007, 10:50 PM   #24
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Let's see if this pic is better


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Old March 12th, 2007, 06:26 AM   #25
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i went to new york last fall in septemeber and i departed from indy... and i remember taking off and seeing how amazing this airport looked in the early stages.... it had a lot of frame work up more like an external skeleton... lets just say it was a site i would never forget when we took off..and it is quite massive to.. A+ for indy on this one.. i can't wait to see it completed.. and be apart of flying out of it... i will feel honored...
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Old March 12th, 2007, 08:00 AM   #26
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Indy decision makers?

Quote:
Originally Posted by cwilson758 View Post
Mansur lands airport hotel
I love the design. It really makes the airport one cohesive project. I know it really isn't cutting edge and could be better, but I really like it. But my biggest complaint is that this project's design is being more scrutinized by decision makers than the convention center hotel. How can the Airport Authority understand the concept of a good design over a group that is supposed to be shapping how our downtown is developed????


Who are the "decision makers"? I've always been curious. Who has their ear?
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Old March 12th, 2007, 03:54 PM   #27
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You might find this blog post of interest:

http://advanceindiana.blogspot.com/2...tle-world.html
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Old March 13th, 2007, 04:15 PM   #28
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More info:

http://advanceindiana.blogspot.com/2...n-airport.html
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Old March 13th, 2007, 04:52 PM   #29
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I don't know how I feel about that nlog.
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Old March 13th, 2007, 05:13 PM   #30
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Like everyone who's on a holy crusade, it's difficult to know if Gary's blog helps or hurts his cause, whatever you think of it. But I think he's a great source of the dirt on some of these political shennanigans. That's pretty much why I read him.

You almost have to be a little over the top to be a blogger. IndyU, Advance, Frugal Hoosiers, Biddle, etc. all have their own unique takes on the blogger style. It's almost the expected mode of discourse if you will.
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Old March 28th, 2007, 06:30 AM   #31
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Airport roof beams will be repositioned
Work will begin today at new terminal project to fix 2 steel beams that dropped 16 inches

Work will begin today to fix a steel problem that has largely halted progress on the new airport terminal's roof for two months.

Two giant, steel roof beams unexpectedly dropped about 16 inches on Jan. 24 as workers were trying to negotiate them into place. Construction was stopped underneath and around the beams while engineers devised a plan to safely put them back in place.

Contractors were expected to begin installing four new shoring towers today to support the beams and replace towers that were damaged when the trusses moved, said David Dawson, a spokesman for the new terminal project at Indianapolis International Airport.

In mid-April, other towers that double as giant jacks will be used to put the trusses back in the proper position, Dawson said.

The beams are about 110 feet long and weigh about 25 tons. They are 70 feet off the ground.

KCE Structural Engineers of Washington, a consulting firm hired by the airport project, is continuing to evaluate the roof to determine whether any welds and bolts were damaged, Dawson said. The firm is also investigating what caused the incident.

In the meantime, other work has continued on the terminal.

Airport officials have said they expect costs stemming from the incident to be covered by insurance and not add to the project's $1.07 billion budget, and that the terminal will still open in late 2008.

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dl...=2007703260396
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Old March 29th, 2007, 05:59 AM   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arenn View Post
You might find this blog post of interest:

http://advanceindiana.blogspot.com/2...tle-world.html

Arenn, I know you are posting the blog link simply to provide a different perspective, but I think people reading this blog (and any blog) really need to consider the source.

First, the supposed "juicy gossip" about Fall Creek Place which the blog discusses was actually the subject of no less than three detailed articles in the Indianapolis Star awhile back.

Second, most of the comments posted are simply partisan attacks riddled with misstatements of fact, and many of the remarks are just bizarre tirades. I am fine with individuals having their own point of view and political agenda, but a blogger should make the effort to be semi-coherent and factually accurate, or at least be upfront when they do not know the facts.

As an example of a well-written blog, I would note that I very much enjoy reading your blog on urban planning and development.
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Old March 30th, 2007, 04:59 AM   #33
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Airport expects art to make big impression
Array of visuals should grab attention of city visitors

Since the mid-1990s, cities have been trying to take advantage of a captive audience by incorporating major public art installations into airport expansion projects.

Long before Indianapolis began forging an ambitious public arts plan for its midfield terminal project, airports in Miami, Denver and Washington, D.C., commissioned millions of dollars’ worth of statues, mosaics and fountains.

Smaller airports, such as Austin-Bergstrom International in Texas, which is on par with Indianapolis in terms of passenger counts, also have latched onto the trend.

When Austin rebuilt its airport in 1999, it set aside $365,000 for art, according to Megan Crigger, administrator of the city of Austin’s Art in Public Places program. Advertising revenue at the airport supports additional commissions, including a $250,000 contract for a memorial sculpture in 2002.

“Airports are busy places,” Crigger said, noting that commissioned art has to be on a large scale to grab people’s attention. “You have to get people to pause and experience the gateway of a city and give them a clue about where they’re about to visit. It’s critical to creating a sense of place.”

Public art efforts at Indianapolis International Airport’s new midfield terminal will easily outpace Austin’s commitment. And unlike most airport art programs that take place in localities with local ordinances requiring a percentage of construction costs go toward art commissions, Indianapolis International Airport’s $3.89 million commitment was voluntary.

“[Typically], if there isn’t a percent-for-art ordinance, you just don’t have a lot of people voluntarily doing it,” said Julia Muney Moore, public arts administrator for Indianapolis-based Blackburn Architects Inc.

The Airport Authority contracted with Blackburn to line up the art commissions and consult on passengers’ experiences at the new terminal. At just under 1 percent of total construction costs, Indianapolis’ commitment is roughly in line with other cities’ mandated programs.

“Art has been part of the development from the beginning, not just an afterthought or an accessory,” said John J. Kish, project director for the new terminal, which is slated to open by late 2008. “It was important for the project to communicate to travelers the importance of arts and culture for the Indianapolis region.”

It’s a concept that’s been around for years, according to Michael Rushton, a professor of public arts administration at Indiana University. Take, for example, New York City’s leading position in the arts world and the beauty of its Grand Central Station.

“It’s an issue of civic pride,” Rushton said. “Your airport is your front door and you want it to be welcoming.”

Some of the final works will go up at the new Indianapolis terminal as early as next month. But the artist-selection process started in 2004 when Blackburn oversaw a general call for artists to submit qualifications, including examples of past pieces, a resume and artist statements.

A panel of seven judges screened more than 500 applicants, winnowing the field to just 52 and eventually to 18 projects proposed for specific sites. From there, 15 artists received commissions to do work for the first round of installations, slated to debut with the new terminal.

With more than a year and a half to go, some of the pieces are already making their way to Indianapolis.

Panels for British-based artist Martin Donlin’s enormous glass murals were hand-blown in Germany and shipped to Minneapolis where they’ll be shipped to Indianapolis and installed in April.

Painted bronze pieces for the whimsical piece “Baggage Claim” by Brooklynbased artist Ron Baron are being cast in
Spencer, a small city about an hour southwest of Indianapolis. And at least one plum contract is yet to be awarded. Eighty-five artists put in spe- cific proposals for an artwork and landscape design to cover a seven-acre site at the entryway from Interstate 70 to the airport, almost two miles from the new terminal.

Moore said the field has been narrowed to six candidates, and the group has one artist it heavily favors, but it has yet to nail down a contract.

Backers hope there will be many waves of commissions for permanent works and temporary exhibits at the terminal. Blackburn has scouted 56 locations in the building and on the grounds and marked them as prime art opportunities. Moore said the plan is to set up a separate not-for-profit by the end of this year to take donations to keep the art presence growing and to make sure travelers are continuously wowed.

“The airport’s a gateway,” Moore said. “We want to give people a good impression so they understand that Indianapolis is a very arts-aware and arts-friendly city.”

Greg Charleston, president of the Arts Council of Indianapolis, agreed.

“It will be a major addition to public art in the city and be the first thing most visitors see when they come to town,” Charleston said. “It tells you a lot about the community and makes the city unique.”

Charleston said that once the terminal is open, the council would include airport art in promotional materials. The project is already creating some buzz in the public arts world because of its price tag alone.

“With that kind of budget, everybody’s going to be watching,” said Austin’s Crigger.

Keira Amstutz, administrator of the Indianapolis Cultural Development Commission, helped pick the artists and said the city is pleased with both the Airport Authority’s commitment and the results.

“This will be a great opportunity to promote Indianapolis,” Amstutz said. “There are going to be some very iconic pieces of work that will become part of the regular stock images used for Indianapolis.”

And though the works aren’t up for view yet, the project is already helping lure visitors to the city. The International Sculpture Center has committed to bring its 2009 national conference—themed “airport as site”—to Indianapolis.

And the city is lobbying to host the American Association of Airport Executives’ annual conference about public art in airports in 2008 so they can take peers on a hard-hat tour before the terminal opens.







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Old March 30th, 2007, 05:09 AM   #34
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kangaroo, thanks for the kind comments on my blog.

I agree that many blogs are muckraking at times. Unfortunately, with the low quality of local media outlets, they are sometimes the only way to find out about various shennanigans going on. Clearly, any information coming from a blog should be treated as reader beware, however.
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Old March 30th, 2007, 05:18 PM   #35
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I can't wait until the new airport opens. The art will be great and will be a nice experience for those moving about the facility.

I realloy hope that the City is able to lure more direct flights and hopefully Northwest will continue to expand on our "mini-hub" status and actually use IND for international flights to Europe...but that is a very long shot.
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Old April 20th, 2007, 07:51 PM   #36
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Airport terminal safe to resume construction

Work will resume Monday at the new Indianapolis International Airport terminal in areas restricted for nearly three months after a pair of steel support beams in the roof collapsed in January.


Richard Potosnak of Aviation Capital Management told the Indianapolis Airport Authority at its monthly meeting today that crews this week finished jacking up the roof structure to extract four support towers damaged on Jan. 24 when two 25-ton beams fell about 16 inches as workers were maneuvering them into place.

A computer model analysis indicated the area was safe enough to allow workers to return to the area, located in the northwest quadrant of the terminal.

“Starting Monday we’ll be able to open up for construction to all the trades,” said Potosnak. “And, as we speak, they’re actually fabricating four more construction shoring towers of twice the (support) capacity, which will allow us to move the steel trusses back into the position they were supposed to.”

Although some construction time was lost, work continued in other areas , and Potosnak told the board the terminal is still on schedule to open in late 2008.

John Kish, director of the New Indianapolis Airport Project, added that the costs stemming from the incident are expected to be covered by insurance and not add to the project’s $1.1 billion budget.
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Old April 20th, 2007, 10:40 PM   #37
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oh..now they have "collapsed." Before they had just "shifted."

I flew in and out this past week and the new airport looks MASSIVE! I can't wait for this to open!
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Old April 28th, 2007, 04:48 PM   #38
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Airport's grand design

Artists will make new midfield terminal a gallery for those on the go
By S.L. Berry and David Lindquist

Indianapolis International Airport's new midfield terminal -- described as a "highly refined machine" by its designer -- will get an artistic personality next week.

A colorful glass mural created by British artist Martin Donlin is scheduled to be placed in the wall of a concourse Monday or Tuesday, the first of 16 works of art to be installed at the terminal.

Terrazzo floor designs and kinetic sculptures will accent the facility when it opens in late 2008, as well as Asian lacquer paintings and bronze benches that resemble pieces of luggage.

All but two of the pieces are tied to Indiana history or culture.
Donlin, for example, incorporates the text of Indiana poets in six of his 14 murals -- which range in size from 9 feet wide by 12 feet tall and 18 feet wide to 24 feet tall.

The cost for all of the art will be $3.94 million, part of the airport's $1.1 billion construction budget.

The goal is to provide memorable viewing experiences for the 10 million passengers expected to pass through the terminal annually, said Julia Muney Moore, public arts administrator for Blackburn Architects, the architectural consultant for the project.

"The airport is the major gateway to the city," Moore said. "It's the first place people see when they get off a plane."

Airports in South Florida and Denver have led a movement to mix aesthetics and travel. Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport uses futuristic installations to engage visitors, while Denver International Airport rotates exhibits in a format similar to that of an art museum.

In Indianapolis, local pride appears to be a theme. The roster of artists features seven from Indiana, including sculptor Dale Enochs.

He used limestone taken from a quarry near his home south of Bloomington to carve two walls that display symbols for earth, water, fire and air. "Elemental Indiana" will be placed between the central part of the terminal, known as the civic plaza, and the ticketing area.

"This is about the alchemy of Indiana," he said. "The reason I work in limestone is that I live here. . . . Limestone is a humble stone. It's not sexy like marble or polished granite. It's humble and forgiving, a lot like the people who live here."

When the airport unveiled plans for the terminal in 2003, project designer Ripley Rasmus of architectural firm Hellmuth, Obata + Kassabaum said the building would be efficient in terms of foot traffic, security and energy use.

But some observers say the design -- dominated by a rounded, sky-lit roof -- lacks a bold streak that could bring positive attention to Indianapolis.
Local architect Jim McQuiston wonders whether travelers will be able to distinguish the terminal from similar facilities in other cities.

"The gently arched roof is a motif that we've seen around the world and around the country many times," said McQuiston, adding he would like to see the terminal in person before judging its architectural merits.

While McQuiston said the inclusion of public art is a positive move, he said paintings and sculptures have limited influence.

"The great buildings of our society are complemented by artwork, but they are not made great by the artwork that's inside them," he said.

Moore predicts the collection of art will present a colorful contrast to the terminal's metal-and-glass structure.

"The interior design scheme will really help the artwork 'pop' and draw people's attention," she said.

Keira Amstutz, administrator of the city's Cultural Development Commission, said the mayor's office applauds the Hoosier connections in the art program. Two pieces are based on the state bird, the cardinal, and a painting depicts prairie vegetation.

"We didn't want the art program just to be pieces of sculpture that were plopped down indiscriminately around the terminal," Amstutz said. "We wanted it to be part of the essence of the building."

From the day Denver International Airport opened its new facilities in 1995, temporary exhibitions and permanent pieces of public art have been on display.

The airport strives to provide variety, said Colleen Fanning, manager of the art program, with works ranging from exhibits on blown glass to Colorado's connection to the space industry.

Having art at the Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport has been an important part of the local public art program since 1980, said Mary Becht, director of the Broward County Cultural Division.

The airport, 21 miles north of Miami, features works by artists from throughout the world, including video art projected on plasma screens, audio installations that mimic the sounds of the Everglades and LED doorways that change color when people pass through them.

Becht said purchasing and maintaining the art is funded by a program that mandates that 2 percent of the county's construction budget be allocated for public art.

"Our airport is under constant building and growth," Becht said, "so it's a constant process of bringing new art to the airport for each new project."

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dl...OCAL/704280513
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Old April 28th, 2007, 05:34 PM   #39
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From the 4/28/07 IndyStar:

espite a setback that halted work on the roof of the new terminal at Indianapolis International Airport, the $1.1 billion project is on schedule to open in late 2008, according to project director John J. Kish.


On Jan. 24, a pair of 25-ton steel roof beams unexpectedly dropped about 16 inches as workers were maneuvering them into place. Work resumed Monday in areas that had been restricted since the incident.

"That truss issue really kicked us back in terms of putting up steel, but we worked on other things through it all, and we'll make up the lost time," said project spokesman David Dawson.
Work on the terminal building is focusing on enclosing the structure, including placement of a 200-foot diameter skylight and the windows and walls that will wrap around the 1.2-million square-foot building. Workers are also building an elevated roadway leading to the terminal's departure level.

"Once the terminal is enclosed, we'll start working on the interior stuff -- the dry wall, all the interior finishes," said Dawson. "There's still a lot of wind blowing through there now."

Construction on the new terminal, located midfield between the two airport's runways, began in July 2005.

"If it's practical to open by the second week of November (2008), we'll open it," said Dawson. "If that timing slips to the beginning of the holiday season, then we'll just jump over to January.

"We wouldn't want to try to make this transition from the old terminal to the new one during the holiday season. The change is going to be instantaneous. Saturday night you'll fly out of the old terminal and Sunday morning you'll fly into the new one."

According to Kish, work on the New Indianapolis Airport Project, which began in 2002, is approximately 45 percent complete and that 88 percent of the project is under contract.

In addition to enclosing the terminal, another priority will be exterior work on a new, five-level parking garage with 5,900 public spaces and 1,200 spaces for rental cars, said Dawson.

The last major piece of the project will be a hotel adjacent to the parking garage. The airport authority is negotiating a contract with Mansur Real Estate Services of Indianapolis, which has proposed a 120,000-square-foot Westin hotel.



Nearly two years into the project and the terminal is only 45% complete? Come on guys, pick up the pace!!
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Old May 10th, 2007, 06:32 PM   #40
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Did anyone catch WTHR's "Inside the New Airport" last night. I hope I have linked this properly.

http://www.wthr.com/global/video/pop...2&rnd=75420299

Just click "play" when the page opens.
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