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Old October 25th, 2016, 07:36 PM   #6561
ChrisZwolle
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C-25 Eix Transversal III

The final and westernmost segment of C-25 'Eix Transversal' in Catalonia, from Manresa to Cervera.

1.

C-25-78 by European Roads, on Flickr

2. Manresa-Nord.

C-25-81 by European Roads, on Flickr

3. Manresa-Oest.

C-25-84 by European Roads, on Flickr

4. C-37 to Igualada. C-37 has been upgraded a couple of years ago.

C-25-88 by European Roads, on Flickr

5.

C-25-90 by European Roads, on Flickr

6. Most interchanges west of Manresa lead to small villages, C-25 traffic is very light here.

C-25-93 by European Roads, on Flickr

7. Rajadell.

C-25-95 by European Roads, on Flickr

8. Castellar.

C-25-101 by European Roads, on Flickr

9. Fonolossa.

C-25-105 by European Roads, on Flickr

10. More suffixed N-141 routes.

C-25-108 by European Roads, on Flickr

11. Calaf

C-25-111 by European Roads, on Flickr

12. Another exit to Calaf.

C-25-115 by European Roads, on Flickr

13. Sant Ramon.

C-25-118 by European Roads, on Flickr

14. The landscape flattens out.

C-25-120 by European Roads, on Flickr

15. The Lleida basin, a flat, agricultural area with not much to offer to tourists except for the city of Lleida.

C-25-121 by European Roads, on Flickr

16. Les Oluges.

C-25-123 by European Roads, on Flickr

17. The A-2 interchange. The exit numbering on C-25 is distance based and could extend across A-2 to the Aragón border to start at 0 in case of Catalan independence.

C-25-127 by European Roads, on Flickr
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Old October 26th, 2016, 12:01 AM   #6562
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The final and westernmost segment of C-25 'Eix Transversal' in Catalonia, from Manresa to Cervera.

15. The Lleida basin, a flat, agricultural area with not much to offer to tourists except for the city of Lleida.
Better said, there's nothing interesting in the Lleida/Lerida basin (and basically the Southern half of the province), the city itself is ugly.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
17. The A-2 interchange. The exit numbering on C-25 is distance based and could extend across A-2 to the Aragón border to start at 0 in case of Catalan independence.
It has been that way from the day they first renumbered their roads in 2000 (no independence in sight, and won't happen anyway). All national roads have a hidden C-xx number, and it's hinted by the high kmposts some start at (And in the C-31 case by the presence of a C-31B near Salou, nowhere near signed C-31).
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Old October 26th, 2016, 12:47 AM   #6563
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Yeah, indeed, AFAIK, C-1X are south-north, C-2X are west-east, C-3X are paralel to coast (km. in south) and C-4X, C-5X and C-6X are opposite to coast (km.0 in the coast)

Road numbers were ready to have all main ones, even motorways or national roads (this is, should a N-XXX is between C-1X and C-1Y, there will be a "gap" for national road, just in case it would be managed by Catalan government and renamed)

Thus.... A-2 start in Madrid but Catalan government considered that should they manage it, they will rename as C-25 from Aragon and A-2 to any other name from Cervera to El Vendrell.
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Old October 26th, 2016, 09:50 AM   #6564
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CNGL View Post
Better said, there's nothing interesting in the Lleida/Lerida basin (and basically the Southern half of the province), the city itself is ugly.
I sadly agree. On our way to Madrid we stopped there to sleep, in a hotel near the station... we didn't feel very safe...
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Old October 26th, 2016, 11:26 AM   #6565
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Lleida has a nice cathedral, it's visible from afar.


On the other hand I did found western Catalonia to have a quite poor feeling. Ugly towns, very low-standard public spaces (i.e. sidewalks, house / building exteriors, etc). In rural areas it's not uncommon to see collapsed and derelict farms / houses. It's quite different from Aragón and Navarra in my experience.
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Old October 26th, 2016, 12:16 PM   #6566
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
On the other hand I did found western Catalonia to have a quite poor feeling. Ugly towns, very low-standard public spaces (i.e. sidewalks, house / building exteriors, etc). In rural areas it's not uncommon to see collapsed and derelict farms / houses. It's quite different from Aragón and Navarra in my experience.
East Aragon near Catalonia is also ugly. Towns like Tamarite, Monzon and the villages around for example.
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Old October 26th, 2016, 12:50 PM   #6567
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Monzon has a castle, itself worth visiting (I still have to do so). I agree the Litera comarca has little interest.

Anyway, the ugliest town I've ever seen is not in those areas. It's Alfamen in the middle of Zaragoza province. It's so ugly, I actually conducted a poll asking what was uglier, if the town or the back of a fridge, and the town won. Nearby Almonacid de la Sierra is far nicer and well worth a visit. And Longares, another neighboring town, features a mudejar (hispanic-muslim)-style church tower which remains visible from A-23 motorway for several kilometers.
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Old October 26th, 2016, 01:09 PM   #6568
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
On the other hand I did found western Catalonia to have a quite poor feeling. Ugly towns, very low-standard public spaces (i.e. sidewalks, house / building exteriors, etc). In rural areas it's not uncommon to see collapsed and derelict farms / houses. It's quite different from Aragón and Navarra in my experience.
It is a part of Spain that has been on the receiving end for the better part of the last few centuries, ransacked and flattened through several conflicts, what the French did not destroy during the Napoleon invasion the civil wars of 19 and 20th century finished of.

Most cities and villages in that part of Spain are composed of piles of rubble cobbled together from the ruins of wars. To expensive to repair and to ugly to preserve. 40 years of moronic economic policies during the dictatorship didn't help either.
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Old October 26th, 2016, 01:14 PM   #6569
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Calatayud as a city is ugly too. However there is an amazing monastery and natural park called Monasterio de Piedra not very far which is definitely worth to visit. Aragaon besides Zaragoza is more interesting in the areas near the Pyrenees for both historical towns and natural sightseeing.
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Old October 26th, 2016, 02:40 PM   #6570
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Lleida isn't probably the most beautiful city in Catalonia, but still it has some remarkable places which are nice to visit (both cathedrals, Paeria palace, riverside walk). However the province itself has amazing tourist attractions, especially in the Pyrenees. It's just the southern part of the province that offers almost nothing to the tourist, as it relies on agriculture and many towns aren't well preserved.

However, western Catalonia is neither poor nor unsafe for Spanish standards. Lleida is of course Catalonia's poorest province, as it's the only one without coast, but it's still richer than the Spanish average. Even in the towns that have a significant amount of migrants due to the jobs in agriculture or in the food industry there aren't any important safety issues for western European standards. They're just boring places, with a significant amount of elderly population due to migrations of younger generations to the cities (namely Barcelona).
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Old October 26th, 2016, 10:58 PM   #6571
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Spanish cities are too compacted, except along stretches on the Mediterranean coast or around Madrid. I never understood that, land in Spain is cheap, cities like Zaragoza and Sevilla have too small of a footprint for their population even if there is a lot of dry-ish land around them to expand horizontally.
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Old October 27th, 2016, 08:34 PM   #6572
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A-10 Irurtzun - Altsasu

Some photos of A-10, a 29 kilometer east-west autovía that runs from AP-15 at Irurtzun to A-1 at Altsasu, in Navarra.

The motorway opened in stages between 1992 and 1995 and replaced N-240-A. It has an unusual exit density (even by Spanish standards), there are 16 exits and 2 motorway interchanges along the 29 km run. There are hardly sections more than 2 km in length with no exits.

map


1. Coming from AP-15, taking A-10 west.

A-10-1 by European Roads, on Flickr

2. A-10 runs through a canyon.

A-10-2 by European Roads, on Flickr

3. Red de Carreteras de Navarra.

A-10-5 by European Roads, on Flickr

4. Etxarren.

A-10-7 by European Roads, on Flickr

5. Altsasu is located at the A-1 interchange, it's also the largest town along A-10.

A-10-8 by European Roads, on Flickr

6.

A-10-10 by European Roads, on Flickr

7.

A-10-12 by European Roads, on Flickr

8. Ihabar.

A-10-14 by European Roads, on Flickr

9. Irañeta.

A-10-16 by European Roads, on Flickr

10. Uharte-Arakil.

A-10-19 by European Roads, on Flickr

11. Uharte-Arakil.

A-10-21 by European Roads, on Flickr

12. Arruazu.

A-10-23 by European Roads, on Flickr

13. Lakuntza.

A-10-25 by European Roads, on Flickr

14. Arbizu.

A-10-28 by European Roads, on Flickr

15. This is the only exit of A-10 between the termini that connects to a regional road that extends beyond the valley.

A-10-30 by European Roads, on Flickr

16.

A-10-33 by European Roads, on Flickr

17. Urdiain.

A-10-35 by European Roads, on Flickr

18. Altsasu. It's a bit larger than the previous villages and towns and has supermarkets. I stopped at one for some groceries.

A-10-39 by European Roads, on Flickr

19. The A-1 interchange.

A-10-41 by European Roads, on Flickr

20. This is an A-1 exit, however westbound traffic can only access it from A-10.

A-10-43 by European Roads, on Flickr

21.

A-10-44 by European Roads, on Flickr

22. Urbasa. My campsite was located on the plateau.

A-10-46 by European Roads, on Flickr
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Old October 28th, 2016, 12:53 AM   #6573
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This is actually the second A-10, the first one is now numbered M-11. Also, it doesn't run through a canyon, it's A-15 just North of Irurtzun which crosses one.

IIRC that was the day I drove all the way to Noain (just South of Pamplona).
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Old October 30th, 2016, 01:00 AM   #6574
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The Sakana valley is very nice for driving. Good roads and amazing views of opposing mountain ranges, looming at both sides. Also, very picturesque towns. I've always liked it.
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Old October 30th, 2016, 01:23 AM   #6575
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During the Franco era, which border was most cumbersome or policed? Spain-France, Span-Portugal or Spain-Andorra?

(I'm excluding Gibraltar because the dictatorial government closed off Gilbraltar in 1949).
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Old October 30th, 2016, 04:21 PM   #6576
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In the post-Civil War years, what was left of communist and anarchist militias in Spain (known as maquis) fled to France and performed more or less regular incursions into Spain. That intensified with the end of WWII when those who had joined the Résistance returned to Spain, though it was mostly dead by the end of the 1940s. Also, ETA terrorists constantly moved between Spain and France. So the border with France was very policed. I'm not sure about the Portuguese border -in fact, I'm not sure if it was open at all throughout the dictatorship. Portugal was under military rule too, so I don't think antifascist guerrillas would seek shelter there.

As for the border with Andorra, the main issue there was smuggling. Until the 1950s Spain did not import anything from abroad (autarquía), and neither did it export, due to the unreal value of the peseta (at pair with the British pound) and extremely high taxes for imported goods. Smugglers regularly brought all kinds of goods from Andorra into Spain, a practice that continued well after the suppression of this disastrous economic policy. The dirt road that connects Andorra with the village of Tor was one of the "famous" smuggling routes.
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Old October 30th, 2016, 04:54 PM   #6577
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C-13

Road C-13 in Catalunya, from Camerasa to Àger. A scenic stretch of road, that is a well-designed highway with climbing lanes, wide lanes, good signalisation. I'm always surprised by the lack of traffic on roads like this. Rural areas of Spain seem to have little mobility. Similar areas in France tend to have more traffic.


C-13-1 by European Roads, on Flickr


C-13-2 by European Roads, on Flickr


C-13-3 by European Roads, on Flickr


C-13-4 by European Roads, on Flickr


C-13-5 by European Roads, on Flickr


C-13-7 by European Roads, on Flickr
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Old October 30th, 2016, 05:53 PM   #6578
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Traffic on C-13 depends highly on the day of the week and the time of the year. As a child I used to take this road with my family on ski weekends and on Sundays it was almost always congested (15-20 years ago).
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Old October 30th, 2016, 09:23 PM   #6579
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The high standard is also to improve access to remote areas. Without a good design speed, it would take very long on dangerous roads to reach places like Tremp, La Pobla de Segur or Sort.

Although C-13 is a wide road, it is still very curvy from Camarasa to the Congost de Terradets. They managed to build a wide road without having to use large bridges.
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Old October 30th, 2016, 09:26 PM   #6580
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Madrid

I found this interesting website about the early motorway projects around Madrid.

>>>: https://madridmobilite.wordpress.com...an-ampliacion/

It's interesting how there was a day of many road openings on the access roads to Madrid. 'El Jefe' opened 5 access roads (parts of A-1, A-2, A-4, A-5, A-6) on 11 October 1968.

* A-1 was a twinning from Alcobendas to San Agustín del Guadalix (18 km)
* A-2 was a bypass of Torrejón de Ardoz
* A-4 was a small upgrade in southern Madrid, in conjunction with the A-42 bridge (Puente Praga) across Río Manzanares
* A-5 was a 6 kilometer six-lane autovía across Avenida Portugal to Cuatro Vientos
* A-6 was a project in northwestern Madrid.

ABC map (1968)
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