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Old March 31st, 2009, 12:57 PM   #101
Amal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjinadasa View Post
It seems to me that the JVP is afraid of loosing the tight grip they have on universities.
Quite possible. But private universities will only benefit those who can afford them. And strangely enough (or not), it's those who can afford them who are clamouring for them. In other words, establishing them creates more opportunities only for those people who have had more opportunities than the general population in the first place. Private universities are not going to do anything for the vast majority of Sri Lankans who actually do need more opportunities to advance themselves.
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Old March 31st, 2009, 03:23 PM   #102
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Interesting...
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Old March 31st, 2009, 05:27 PM   #103
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Amal View Post
Quite possible. But private universities will only benefit those who can afford them. And strangely enough (or not), it's those who can afford them who are clamouring for them. In other words, establishing them creates more opportunities only for those people who have had more opportunities than the general population in the first place. Private universities are not going to do anything for the vast majority of Sri Lankans who actually do need more opportunities to advance themselves.
true, but one of the main arguments for the private unis is that such people will spend money to get into foreign unis anyway, so why not retain that inside the country while providing them with a qualification that doesn't need to be 'converted'.

Either way, I don't see that decreasing the opportunities offered to the general population, since most of the state uni students are virtually guaranteed to get a state sector job when they get out, and private uni students will never get that choice. Expecting people who just missed out on free uni education to pay exorbitant amounts to go to foreign countries is a tad unfair.

As for the photo, it looks pretty realistic. But I think the bloom effect is too much it kinda hurts the eye. Also the white frames around the door and the window seems to boxy (?)
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Old March 31st, 2009, 07:31 PM   #104
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjinadasa View Post
true, but one of the main arguments for the private unis is that such people will spend money to get into foreign unis anyway, so why not retain that inside the country while providing them with a qualification that doesn't need to be 'converted'.
Ah, but who is to say that the private universities will not be a branch of a foreign university or that they won't be owned by a foreign group? And what difference does it really make if the money is just going into the bank account of an individual or consortium who owns the private university (even if they are Sri Lankan) - the money certainly won't be going towards funding better schools, technical colleges etc for the rest of the Sri Lankan population. It's just going to be a profit making venture for the owners. And with regards to qualifications, do British/US/Australian/European qualifications really need to be 'converted'? As far as I know, it's Sri Lankan qualifications that aren't that highly regarded (fairly or unfairly) by many other countries.

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Either way, I don't see that decreasing the opportunities offered to the general population, since most of the state uni students are virtually guaranteed to get a state sector job when they get out, and private uni students will never get that choice. Expecting people who just missed out on free uni education to pay exorbitant amounts to go to foreign countries is a tad unfair.
Since when has a state sector job been considered lucrative? Not since the colonial times and a little after independence I would say Just as students from private schools seem to have better opportunities because of their connections and affluence, I think so will the students of private universities.

What's unfair, I think, is putting people who already have (and have had) opportunities ahead of people who do not. Like I said before, private universities are not going to help the vast majority of Sri Lankan students; they will only be providing opportunities to those who can afford to pay the university's asking price. I would've thought solving the problems affecting the vast majority of Sri Lankan students would be a more urgent priority than satisfying the desires of a minority with $$ to spend. But unfortunately the less well off aren't heard as much as the vocal and vociferous better-off who want their way, and only their way.

Last edited by Amal; March 31st, 2009 at 07:37 PM.
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Old March 31st, 2009, 08:24 PM   #105
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Originally Posted by Amal View Post
Ah, but who is to say that the private universities will not be a branch of a foreign university or that they won't be owned by a foreign group?..........

Since when has a state sector job been considered lucrative? Not since the colonial times and a little after independence I would say Just as students from private schools seem to have better opportunities because of their connections and affluence, I think so will the students of private universities.

What's unfair, I think, is putting people who already have (and have had) opportunities ahead of people who do not.......
The state sector jobs are highly regarded due to the incentives they offer, and of course the job security.

Ok so the private unis maybe owned by foreign entities, but other than the direct tuition cost consider the expenses students have to bare in foreign countries. Also, I don't suppose the companies will be hiring everyone from their originating countries, and investment will happen. Also, allowing private universities won't cost the government a dime. If the well offs are heard better than the 'less well offs' private universities would have been a reality several decades ago.

As for your argument about money not going towards funding better schools, technical colleges etc, when did the state unis contribute to this ? They've been siphoning money from the state with virtually no returns. Its fine and dandy providing equal opportunities to everyone, but think of the middle class of the country and the people who couldn't get to the state unis but will try and get to a local private uni through third party funding, because all those well offs you talk about will aim for the best universities abroad (and such people are few) and wouldn't give a damn about the local ones. Its the man in the middle that gets the sh*t end of the stick eventually.

Also we have to consider the current state of the state universities.. COME ON, they are closed for more than 6 months at times, how the hell are students supposed to learn ? If the government wants to clean up the unis I say that they should implement a rule where a student it only allowed to stay in the uni for a certain fixed period. This will remove all the political junkies and the next che guevaras from the system.

I think we'd better take this to the education topic.
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Old April 2nd, 2009, 12:28 AM   #106
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Protests over an opening of private Medical Faculty

Tuesday, March 31, 2009 Leave a Comment

( April 01, Colombo, Sri Lanka Guardian) The controversy over the establishment of a new private medical college has surfaced again with the Inter University Students’ Federation (IUSF) planning protests.

With plans being unveiled to open a private medical faculty being constructed at Malabe in affiliation with a university in Russia, various persons expressed their views.

The issue is not new with the debate dating back to 1981with the establishment of a private medical institute, which was attached to the Kelaniya University amidst many protests.

The proposed new medical faculty in Malabe has already got the green light from the Board of Investment (BOI). According to Dhammika Perera, Chairman of the BOI, the University Grants Commission too had gone through the proposal to establish a private medical faculty and had said that it did not come under their purview. “This is a higher education institute affiliated to a foreign university,” he said.

He added that the degree obtained through the university was equal to a degree obtained by students who travelled and studied in Russia. Nothing about Sri Lanka was even mentioned in the degree certificate, he said.

Dr. Neville Fernando, chief executive officer of the new medical faculty said that all arrangements were ready to begin academic sessions shortly.

“The first intake will be 100 students selected through the Z-Score. We plan to take in the best students for the medical faculty,” Dr. Fernando said.

He said one had to spend over Rs. 5 million to enter a medical faculty in the United Kingdom or Australia. A deposit of Rs. 5 million had to be deposited before going there. But here in Sri Lanka, it was only Rs. 5.5 million, he said.

However, Udul Premarathne, convener of the Inter University Students’ Federation (IUSF) disagreed.

“This is a big farce. This is just a private university that only has a massive image. This is an attempt to destroy free education in the country and to privatise it. Opening up private universities, while having state universities is an element of privatisation,” said Premarathne.

On the claims of Z-Score, the IUSF convener said that students to the private faculty would not be admitted on the basis of marks obtained. “Students are admitted if they have Rs. 6 million,” he said.

He also said that large-scale protests would be organized together with all medical students. The private university in Malabe would definitely be closed down, he said.
Professor Wishwa Warnapala, Minister of Higher Education, expressing his views on the issue said that neither the government nor the ministry had decided to open private universities.

“On the other hand, a bill should be passed in Parliament to open a private university,” Prof. Warnapala said.

Commenting on the planned protests, Minister Maithripala Sirisena, general secretary of the Sri Lanka Freedom Party said that it was an attempt to justify their political existence.

“We should look at the world with an open mind. We all want to give our children the best education at an institution of our choice. Instead of clinging on to meaningless arguments, we should open the opportunities of the new world to our new generations. We should all agree to such endeavours,” the minister said.
..............
Once again JVP idiots
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Old April 2nd, 2009, 08:42 AM   #107
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Quote:
“This is a big farce. This is just a private university that only has a massive image. This is an attempt to destroy free education in the country and to privatise it. Opening up private universities, while having state universities is an element of privatisation,” said Premarathne.
sira olmada karayek.. How the hell is this going to privatise the free education system ? It will always be there ! We should name this idiot Captain Oblivious. Hopefully medical students are smarter than these idiots. Why can't all campuses be like Moratuwa ?
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Old April 2nd, 2009, 09:38 AM   #108
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so what if they have private universities? people who can afford will go it...dont they get it? A democracy is all about people having choices and as much as possible so they can make up their own mind, if these nutcases in the state uni's (not all, only a minority!) think that opening up a private uni is privatization then GOD HELP US...they're a bunch of stupid, ignorant doctors coming our way!!! maybe they should spend more time ACTUALLY STUDYING instead of playing petty politics with the ones wearing red!!
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Old April 2nd, 2009, 10:58 AM   #109
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Democracy? I dont think JVP stands for that do they? lol. Honestly... what is it to them if a private uni is opened? None of the state unis are closing for this. Gosh.. if people want to go to a private uni then they should have all the right to. They just want to be able to have a hold on the minds of students and if the students go to private unis they will not be able to do so and therefore gain only fewer supporters.
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Old April 2nd, 2009, 02:23 PM   #110
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yeah, the JVP is scared about loosing that little influence they have left.
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Old April 2nd, 2009, 02:24 PM   #111
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This is is the only country in the world where Doctors and Medical students strike! They should be happy with got a place in the state university, and study to become doctors many of others did not, and had to fork out money to study abroad. The private university shoudl be given the go-ahead, as it would stop students from having to go to India, Bangladesh or Russia, and study in SRILANKA!

Most of the students are hyprocties, anyway because they not only work in the state hospitals, but then they go work in the prviate hospitals too!!!!

In addition private universites, there would be no strikes, as they would not be controlled by the ******* JVP.
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Old April 3rd, 2009, 12:55 AM   #112
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BOI chief justifies setting up of private campus

A staggering Rs. 9 billion worth of foreign currency is being sent annually by a certain local agent re-presenting a cluster of Australian universities for the education of 3000 students who study in Australia, BOI Chairman Dhammika Perera said yesterday.

Addressing a news briefing at the Information Department he said the local representative must send Rs. 27 billion worth of foreign currency – Rs. 3 million each- for 3000 students by the time they complete their 3 year degree programmes.

“This is only a fraction of the drain of foreign currency to indicate the amount Sri Lanka loses when our students go abroad to study,” Mr. Perera said.

Justifying the BOI’s decision to give approval to establish a private medical college ‘The Higher Education Institute’ at Malabe by the South Asian Institution of Technology and Management, he said the College will provide training to students in collaboration with the Nizhny Novgorod Medical Acadamy in Russia.

“All students enrolled would be from GCE O/L qualified students and academic staff will be recruited from foreign professionals.

The degree offered to students will be from the Novgorod University.

If a medical degree holder wants to practice in Sri Lanka, he or she must follow the guidelines and regulations of the Sri Lanka Medical Council and sit the exam under clause 17,” Mr. Perera stressed.

There will be no government involvement in establishing the College. But the country will benefit when a considerable amount of foreign currency remains within. The benefit to parents and students when they obtain a foreign degree studying in Sri Lanka would be that, they can obtain the degree in their own country with only 30% of the expenses they would have spent abroad, he stressed.

The local university system is not in a position to enroll the entire number students who qualified for university enrolment at the GCE O/L students who get through the GCE A/L get the opportunity to enroll for university education. We can’t see any injustice in giving a chance to thousands of students to continue their studies in a private university within their own country. Besides, the move is a blessing to the economy when the amount of foreign currency involved is considered,” MR Perera emphasized.

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Old April 3rd, 2009, 01:49 PM   #113
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Nice, finally some hard facts for the JVP to devour...
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Old April 3rd, 2009, 03:23 PM   #114
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sjinadasa View Post
The state sector jobs are highly regarded due to the incentives they offer, and of course the job security.
They are?

Quote:
Ok so the private unis maybe owned by foreign entities, but other than the direct tuition cost consider the expenses students have to bare in foreign countries. Also, I don't suppose the companies will be hiring everyone from their originating countries, and investment will happen. Also, allowing private universities won't cost the government a dime. If the well offs are heard better than the 'less well offs' private universities would have been a reality several decades ago.
But one of the biggest points put forward by proponents of private universities is that "money stays in the country." But if they are owned by foreign entities, in reality money will be leaving the country. There is also no guarantee that the employees will all be Sri Lankan. If they do end up hiring Sri Lankan lecturers from state universities by waving $$, it will deprive all the other students of good teachers. I think the well-offs have been heard long enough from colonial times uptil today, at the expense of everyone else; I see it as part of the problems currently besetting Sri Lanka.


Quote:
As for your argument about money not going towards funding better schools, technical colleges etc, when did the state unis contribute to this ? They've been siphoning money from the state with virtually no returns.
Education in Sri Lankan universities is provided free of charge. Thus I don't see how your question about state universities contributing towards schools and technical colleges applies here. Virtually no returns? Where do you think most of Sri Lanka's engineers, doctors, lawyers, surveyors etc have graduated from? Clearly most Sri Lankans consider entry into a state university as very valuable - is that not why a section are clamouring for private universities - because they couldn't get into a state university in the first place? Is that not why entry is highly competitive and only those with the best marks are admitted?

Quote:
Its fine and dandy providing equal opportunities to everyone, but think of the middle class of the country and the people who couldn't get to the state unis but will try and get to [a local private uni through third party funding, because all those well offs you talk about will aim for the best universities abroad (and such people are few) and wouldn't give a damn about the local ones. Its the man in the middle that gets the sh*t end of the stick eventually.
Exactly why should the interests of the upper class and the upper middle class trump the interests of everyone else? Private universities are being touted as some sort of panacea for all of Sri Lanka's higher educational ills, but I don't think it's that simple at all. In my opinion there is a more pressing need to provide opportunities to the vast majority of the Sri Lankan population who don't have access to a computer or speak English or live in Colombo but are interested in educating themselves.

Quote:
Also we have to consider the current state of the state universities.. COME ON, they are closed for more than 6 months at times, how the hell are students supposed to learn ? If the government wants to clean up the unis I say that they should implement a rule where a student it only allowed to stay in the uni for a certain fixed period. This will remove all the political junkies and the next che guevaras from the system.

I think we'd better take this to the education topic.
Yeah, state universities need to be cleaned up. I agree with you on that.
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Old April 4th, 2009, 03:16 AM   #115
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The South Asian Institute of Technology and Management





SAITM offers a friendly environment, excellent staff and great facilities in a lively city in the heart of Sri Lanka’s first technology park.

SAITM is a contemporary campus providing quality tertiary education for the students of today. We pride ourselves on being supportive, flexible and relevant to the real world. We all know that the theory is important but SAITM knows that putting what you learn into practice is just as valuable. That’s why our courses have a strong focus on providing real life solutions to real life problems. Practical projects, industry placements and guest speakers are key features of our programs.

We strive to provide a different learning approach, developed to maximise the student outcome and experience, as well as providing state-of-the-art facilities and infrastructure.

The South Asian Institute of Technology and Management (SAITM) proudly announces an opportunity for students who have obtained sufficient qualifications to enter the state universities in Sri Lanka but are unable to do so due to lack of space the chance of entering a Medical faculty in Sri Lanka. SAITM has negotiated with one of the best Medical Universities in Russia, to offer this degree. The Niznhy Novgorod State Academy of Medicine will collaborate with the Faculty of Medicine of the South Asian Institute of Technology and Management (SAITM) which would henceforth be called:

Faculty of Medicine
The Faculty of Medicine, SAITM

Our aim is to produce patient friendly doctors with a broad medical education. For this purpose students will be taught the same subjects as in Sri Lanka but will also be imparted knowledge of the History of Medicine, Philosophy, Fundamental Law, Psychology, IT, Languages including Russian and other subjects which are important for a modern day doctor. The course will be of five years duration, where students will be studying four years in Sri Lanka and the final year to be completed in Russia.

Students will have to sit the Act 16 examination as this degree will be considered a foreign degree. Lectures will commence at the SAITM Malabe Campus, Millennium Drive, Weliwita in September 2009 to synchronise with the Russian University calendar.

Students can also transfer to Russia at any time if they so desire.
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Old April 11th, 2009, 12:59 PM   #116
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"money stays in the country." is not the biggest point of having private education. The biggest point is to create more opportunities for those who can some how grab them.

Institute may be owned by some other org in another country and they may be taking the profit. But imagine the amount of money that will go outside if you have to go abroad for studies. That is a lot compared to having private education here. Having private education here in SL is much more affordable for many people than going abroad. That way it create many opportunities to people.

And it is not just the upper or upper middle class people that can grab them. Any one who has the will can take those opportunities. There are plenty of way to fund your private education even when you don't have money. I know some people who sell their properties to spend for higher educations. Unlike older days there are affordable education loans that you can take.

Most popular private education institutes has merit based scholarship systems in place.

There are companies that will pay your education cost provided you will work for them while you are studying.

And I remember ones there was a scholarship scheme by samurdi initiative to pay for private education for students in poor families.

If you add up all those programs there will be a good number of opportunities for those who are not rich enough to pay for it. But of course you have to be really good at what you do to get some of above opportunities but I guess that's the idea.

All those opportunities will grow over time because when the private education sector grows the demand for such programs will also grow. And when the demand grows supply will also follow.

Also it is something worth noticing that most of the people go abroad for studies never return to work here. Of course they will return money home. But they don't help much to local industry which need that educated people to grow. That can change if people are educated here in SL. With more educated people in the country the local industries can grow faster and create more opportunities.

"Education in Sri Lankan universities is provided free of charge"

Really? Am I missing some thing here. Are those education facilities and resources cost nothing to use and maintain. Do those lecturers teach free of charge. Don't they pay anything for those who work at Unis?. Don't they use electricity and other resources that cost money? Do they get computers and other equipments free of charge? There is no such thing called free education. Someone has to pay for it. Its only fair if you are paying yourself for what you get.

By the way, the reason why getting selected to a public uni is considered valuable is because then, you don't have to pay for it (some one else will). But trust me there are many who get selected in to public unis but then decide not to go there. And they go for private education instead. Some of them are not even rich people. And for those people reasons are obvious.

Also if you want to get a direct financial benefit to country from private unis its very simple. Government can put up a tax. They have plenty of taxes for other things why not private education . Or government can demand each private uni should educate a percentage of students free of charge. Those things can be done via regulation.

But even without those there will be a huge benefit to economy. Most people educated there will join local industries just like those educated in public education institutes. That will make this country more attractive for investments as well as it will make it easy for local organizations to find the talent they need instead of getting them from some other country. Some of those people will setup their own businesses (there are organizations to hep students on this) creating more opportunities. The money those people will make will be spend in this country and will circulate within country at least one cycle before sending them abroad for various imports.

Don't just look at it in terms of who gets to get in and who is not. Look at how it will improve the big picture.

Last edited by rakhitha; April 13th, 2009 at 07:11 PM.
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Old June 20th, 2009, 12:31 AM   #117
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A glimpse of the ‘future’




The ‘Future Minds’ national education and career exhibition commenced today and will be on for three days at the BMICH, Colombo

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Old July 21st, 2009, 01:10 AM   #118
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President launches educational DTV TV channel



President Mahinda Rajapaksa, launched ‘Nenasa’ - a state-of-the-art Digital Satellite Television based Distance Education Bridge, managed and operated by the Ministry of Education and the National Institute of Education (NIE).

‘Nenasa’ will connect 1,000 rural schools in Sri Lanka to high-quality rendition of the national curriculum, developed by the NIE over a digital satellite television broadcast medium.

The President together with Minister of Education, Susil Premjayantha, launched the broadcast from a classroom in a rural school in the Moneragala district - opening a new vista in access to education to students in Grades 9, 10 and 11 at the Ranjan Wijeratne Maha Vidyalaya in Pelwatta Moneragala and simultaneously to an estimated 500,000 other students accessing ‘Nenasa’ from across Sri Lanka, including the Northern and Eastern provinces.

The President said, “It gives me immense pleasure to be part of this event founded on the principle of rural empowerment, which is an integral focus of our Government as spelt out in the Mahinda Chinthanaya. Our Government is making every effort to harness the potential of rural Sri Lanka, with special emphasis on enhancing educational facilities in remote regions including the newly-liberated areas in the North and East.

‘Nenasa’ is a gateway towards achieving an empowered society in our march towards the future as one nation.

I take this opportunity to commend Dialog Telekom for its sincere commitment to create a knowledge-based society through its pioneering technology and for its laudable gesture in gifting ‘Nenasa’ to the people of Sri Lanka,” he added.

‘Nenasa’ will be dedicated towards broadcasting educational content and cater to the Ordinary Level and Advanced Level syllabus in Sinhala and Tamil. In addition, teacher-training and skills development would also be included in the program line-up.

These lessons will be supplemented by a Learning Management System (LMS) through which the interactive element of ‘Nenasa’ is facilitated.

The LMS enables children who have access to the internet to download educational material on Nenasa from the internet via www.nenasa.lk, which will effectively be the first time the Sri Lankan educational curriculum would become available on the internet.

It gives us immense pride and satisfaction to steer an education program of this magnitude that would contribute towards empowering and enriching the country’s future generations,” said, Group Chief Executive of Dialog Telekom PLC, Dr. Hans Wijayasuriya.

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Old July 31st, 2009, 05:16 PM   #119
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These 'men-in-red' jackasses have always been the root of why Sri Lanka has been stuck in the same rut for all these years. If private universities pick up pace in SL they will definitely out do the state universities and we will produce more useful and educated people for our country.

Udaya Gammanpila another politician (dunno which party) voicing against these foreign universities received his university education at the Monash University in Australia. Talk about hypocrisy (aargh!!). It’s time that we become more open minded and started moving ahead in this world instead of being left behind.

And yes having private universities is more about increasing opportunities for young minds to shine rather than saving foreign currency. Institutions in SL that are currently providing pathway programs (such as ANC or ACBT) should reach out to the other areas of the country as well and not only concentrate on Colombo. Sri Lankans as whole are really brainy and creative, but all these years they haven’t been given opportunities. It’s time that things changed!
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Old September 20th, 2009, 02:29 AM   #120
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International University soon under public-private partnership

An international university is to be set up in the island with public and private sector partnership. President Mahinda Rajapaksa has given his consent to set up the university to cater to the needs of higher education for students both here and overseas.

Well-known academic, Prof. Gunapala Nanyakkara who has taken over the responsibility of resurrecting Ceylinco Sussex College, yet another multi-billion rupee enterprise of the troubled Ceylinco Group, said that he has already sought the approval of the University Grants Commission to set up this university to save a large sum of foreign exchange which is being spent by a hundreds of Sri Lankan parents for highest studies of their children.

Janaka Ratnayake

He added that Sri Lanka could also earn much needed foreign exchange from overseas students who would be enrolled to this international university. Students of Ceylinco Sussex College will get an opportunity to enter this university as its first batch, he said. The name of the institution has also been changed to Sussex College.

The Merchant Bank of Sri Lanka (MBSL)(subsidiary BOC) has appointed Prof. Nanyakkara as the CEO of Sussex College after taking over of the management of the crisis -ridden network with 20 schools countrywide. Chairman MBSL Janaka Ratnayake said that his institution's intervention is a far reaching decision, since closure of the Sussex College would have social political and financial implications on the country's economy. Over 5,000 students are studying at these schools for local examinations in the English Medium.

Approximately 60% of the assets of the Sussex College are financed by The Finance Company while the balance of its assets are funded by bank loans, private individual investments and Profit Sharing Company Ltd, another failed Ceylinco entity. The total assets of Sussex College are valued at Rs.1 billion.

The network will be upgraded through new initiatives and strategies of diversification and expansion in the near future, Mr Ratnayake said.

ST
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Last edited by saraprobe; September 20th, 2009 at 02:35 AM.
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