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Old March 28th, 2008, 10:54 PM   #101
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, wonderful render...can't wait until it is UC!
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Old March 30th, 2008, 02:47 PM   #102
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Wow. That's the first render ever where they actually have Pakistani people in them!

oh yeah and cool design!
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Old March 30th, 2008, 02:54 PM   #103
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Just to let everyone know that second design is actually another project within Karachi called the Karachi Port Tower.

This is the KPT Tower Complex.

Yes confusing, and whoever named it should be slapped until the end of times, however I'll rejoice since two big ones are going up in Karachi (well I hope).

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Old March 30th, 2008, 07:14 PM   #104
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^its just Port Tower and not Karachi Port Tower
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Old April 15th, 2008, 01:29 PM   #105
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Karachi Cracker

Published: 02 April 2008 10:23 Last Updated: 03 April 2008 15:54



In Karachi, Pakistan's second city, a tall building is characterised as anything over 10 storeys. The loftiest have reached 20. So it is no overstatement to say that the 78 storey Karachi Port Tower, construction of which is scheduled to start this year, will transform the city's skyline.

Compared to the Burj Dubai, which will be the world's tallest building at 146 or more storeys, 78 storeys doesn't sound so remarkable. But Karachi Port Tower will be the tallest building on the Indian subcontinent.

Building on this scale in Pakistan is a one-off and poses some interesting challenges. Nobody in the country has ever carried out a site investigation for a building of this size before. Exceptionally deep and large foundations are required but local batching plants are not equipped to produce concrete in the volumes and strength required. The specialist falsework, formwork, cranage and concrete pumping equipment needed for ultra-high buildings does not yet exist in Pakistan.

"Construction will require international know-how, but with local knowledge. Three joint ventures of foreign main contractors with local firms have been shortlisted," reveals Mott MacDonald director Steve Gregson, who is leading structural, facade, mechanical and electrical, and fire engineering. "But whichever of the three is selected, they will be heavily reliant on local subcontractors."

Throughout the design process a close eye has been kept on buildability and making the structure suitable for local conditions and skills.

Client Karachi Port Trust is the port authority and operator and is also a major property and infrastructure owner. It is undertaking the project on a speculative basis. In addition to office space it also wants housing, a hotel and a conference centre, and it specified "something iconic". Mott MacDonald and architect Aedas won the design competition last year, and are taking the design to "detailed concept" stage.

Offices will occupy ground level up to floor 58, a hotel will take up floors 59 to 76 and the top two floors will be apartments and leisure facilities. The contractor will be appointed to deliver the £200M-plus scheme under a FIDIC design and build contract.

Steel construction is rare in Pakistan, so Karachi Port Tower will be built from concrete.

It will consist of a cylindrical core ringed by columns at the building's perimeter. Structurally, square cores are stiffer, Gregson notes. The cylinder was specified for architectural reasons and to achieve spatial efficiency within the tower's circular footprint. But lack of stiffness has been more than made up for by increasing the core's diameter to 31.5m and tying in the ring of perimeter columns.

The core size and other aspects of the structural design were dictated by the post-9/11 rethink of fire evacuation from tall buildings, driven by Mott MacDonald's fire specialists. "You used to be told 'if there's a fire, evacuate using the stairs'," says Justin Garman, one of
Mott MacDonald's fire engineers. "But the World Trade Center disaster showed that stair capacity wasn't enough, and that some people were physically incapable of descending tens of storeys by stair.

"So now, for very tall buildings, lifts are being looked on as integral to the fire evacuation strategy." Lift capacity has been designed for an office population density of one person per 11m2, so there will be a lot of them.

Karachi Port Tower will be equipped with a combination of express and local lifts. High-speed lifts, moving people over large numbers of floors, will be double deckers. Passengers will then catch local lifts from transition zones to their destined floor.

Over the height of the tower there will be three transition zones. Structurally these are very different to the tower's typical open plan floors. Floor slabs throughout the tower will be 260mm thick post-tensioned concrete, stiffened by a 400mm deep edge beam. Columns will be tied into the circular ring by an 850mm-deep downstand.

But the two-storey transition zones will be of far heavier construction, with thicker floor slabs and heavily reinforced concrete outrigger shear walls running from the core to the building's perimeter columns. Each zone will house a technical floor dedicated to building services, and a fire-proofed refuge. It is to these refuges that people will be led if fire breaks out. They will then be speeded to ground level in express lifts.

The transition zone shear walls play an important role in linking the core and columns. Gregson says that at the lowest of the technical floors the stiffening effect of the outrigger walls is minimal. "When we modelled the structure we found we don't need outrigger walls there, so we've omitted them and gained a fairly significant cost saving."

Design has had to deal with the age-old problem of differential axial shortening between core and columns under dead load. This occurs when a structural member is squashed by the weight of the structure above. The taller the column, the greater the degree of potential shortening.

Sized purely for structural efficiency, columns would have shortened by more than 75mm, Gregson notes. "You can allow for a degree of axial shortening by introducing a slight camber into the floor slab. That camber comes down as you build the structure up, and the floor ends up level." But a greater than 75mm correction was at the edge of technical feasibility.

Columns have therefore been sized to reduce stress and shortening. In plan they are elongated triangles with rounded corners, measuring 2m wide by 3m deep. Column sizes diminish as they rise up the building – first in width, then in depth.

Mega columns are required over the height of the tower's hotel atrium, slicing through the topmost 25 storeys. "Five columns are left free-standing by the atrium," Gregson says. Perimeter beams every five floors provide lateral restraint – columns follow the cigar-like profile of the tower's facade, so are subject to considerable outward force. Otherwise, the columns are structurally independent.

Gregson says that lower down the tower, axial shortening could have been reduced by specifying very high-strength concrete. "But we want to keep the concrete mix within the realms of what is feasible in Pakistan." Achieving C100 would require the use of exotic additives and very precise mix control. C65 concrete will be easier to batch and more forgiving in construction.

Concessions to the local construction market have also been made in the arrangement of columns and in the tower's foundations. Karachi Port Tower's facade is dominated by a spiral that twists through 180o over its height. "We initially looked at following the spiral with the columns, so they would have been raking," recalls Gregson. However, "to make them work it would have required very heavy reinforcement and precise steel fixing. Because there's no precedent for a building of this height in Pakistan, we felt it sensible not to add avoidable complexity."

Though columns are oriented to the curvature of the facade, an alternative way of expressing the spiral was found, says Gregson. "The spiral is achieved by cantilevering the floorplate by just over 3m on opposing sides of the tower. As you go up the tower, the cantilever moves around a few degrees."

the bigger picture
Karachi is 200km from the nearest seismic fault line and is generally regarded as at low to medium risk from earthquakes Đ UBC seismic zone 2B. But, because nothing even a fifth as tall as Karachi Port Tower has been attempted in Pakistan before, Mott MacDonald decided to reassess the seismic risk.

"Our specialist geotechnical engineers have just completed the analysis and concluded that for the purpose of this project Karachi should be treated as seismic zone 3," says Mott MacDonald director Steve Gregson. "Complying with structural requirements for zone 2 is easier.
Taking it up to zone 3 introduces some major structural issues."

And "sloshing" tuned mass dampers will be installed on the tower's roof. These will consist of water tanks connected by large-diameter pipes with tuned baffles.

Quake engineering
Karachi Port Tower forms the focal point in a scheme involving construction of a conference centre and five residential towers.

 Underlying the complex will be a double-storey, 2,000-space subterranean car park.

 The only vehicles seen above ground on site will be the Port Trust's fleet of electrically powered service trucks.

 Power cuts are commonplace in Karachi. To prevent the tower being plunged into darkness, it is being equipped with twin 132kV power supplies - in Karachi the high voltage supplies are less affected by cuts than low voltage lines. In case of blackout, the complex also has its own generating plant.

 Karachi Port Tower will have its own water and waste water treatment plants.

Focal point: Karachi Port tower is part of a larger scheme




Source: New Civil Engineer (NCE)
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Old April 15th, 2008, 01:32 PM   #106
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anyone who has the slightest idea of what they talked about in the above article care to translate it into layman's term
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Old April 15th, 2008, 01:51 PM   #107
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Barker Mohandas LLC are have done the Elevator/Lift Concept Design Study for KPT Tower
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Old April 16th, 2008, 12:09 AM   #108
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Quote:
Originally Posted by musiddiqui View Post
Published: 02 April 2008 10:23 Last Updated: 03 April 2008 15:54



In Karachi, Pakistan's second city, a tall building is characterised as anything over 10 storeys. The loftiest have reached 20. So it is no overstatement to say that the 78 storey Karachi Port Tower, construction of which is scheduled to start this year, will transform the city's skyline.
Pakistan's second city???????
which1 is the first.....?
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Old April 16th, 2008, 03:34 AM   #109
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Dumb journalist i guess.

But those renders are freaking amazing!! They should be starting the construction very soon i presume.
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Old April 21st, 2008, 01:56 PM   #110
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I found these images while surfing the net. don't know how old are these but the owner of these images mentioned that this is kpt tower site. can anybody confirm?














I think they are doing some initial research work? soil testing, may be. just a layman guess
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Old April 21st, 2008, 01:59 PM   #111
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arslanalf View Post
Pakistan's second city???????
which1 is the first.....?
duh ... obviously the capital (islamabad, for you dumbasses) is the first city ...
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Old April 21st, 2008, 02:00 PM   #112
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Old April 21st, 2008, 04:54 PM   #113
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yes this is the KPT Tower site

Last edited by musiddiqui; April 21st, 2008 at 05:28 PM.
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Old April 22nd, 2008, 10:45 PM   #114
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probably soil testing and reclamation work...
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Old April 23rd, 2008, 11:34 PM   #115
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kbboy View Post
probably soil testing and reclamation work...
I think it is probably just soil testing because they had reclaimed land a long time ago, didn't they?

But its a good sign that at least some work is being done.
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Old April 24th, 2008, 05:06 PM   #116
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they reclaimed land a long time ago but they need to realign the land
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Old April 24th, 2008, 07:22 PM   #117
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how far this complex will be from the actule dowtown of karachi?

could someone post a picture of the CDb of Karachi ?

thanks guys

this project is absolutely great !!!!

What about the waterfront project any updates ? i m not sure if the project will bbe located in Karachi or Lahore ....
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Old May 15th, 2008, 03:12 PM   #118
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got a few more details, there was more on the site but that stuff has already been posted a billion times before so just posting stuff that we dont already know

KPT Tower Project details:

The total site area of the development is 77,090sq m. Building heights are as follows:
- Tallest tower: 331.8m (~1088.6 ft) (to the top floor), 352m (~1154.9 ft) to the building crown
- Residential towers: ascending heights of 84m (~275.6 ft), 102m (~334.6 ft), 118m (~387.1 ft) and 134m (~439.6 ft)
- Conference and residential building: 35m (~114.8 ft)
- Hotel Atrium: 85m (~278.9 ft)

Echoing the design of the largest tower, the four adjacent towers of varying height are arranged around a freshwater lake, which extends the quality and reflections of the waterside context back across the site and stretches above the 2000-plus space car park concealed below. Its distinctive serpentine form meets the seafront alongside the restaurant, and the 1,200-seat convention centre and exhibition hall.

At the heart of the scheme, a soaring glazed canopy reaches over water-cascaded steps, revealing dramatic views to the rich mix of uses and world class public spaces. The tallest glass tower at the centre of the development takes its form from stacked and twisted conic strips, which create a shape of repetitive panels. The 105-degree twisting curves divide the form into four petals, and the stacked tower culminates with two off-set petals continuing through the twist above the last floor plate. This defines the crown of the building.

Solar shades, modern services, and wind capture technology will contribute to the building’s energy efficiency and long-term sustainability. The asymmetric sun shades or blades and glass fritting respond directly to the local sun path to minimise heat gain whilst maximising glass clarity and views.

Aedas Director, David Kingdom – Project Director for KPT Tower




Source: e-architect
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Old July 18th, 2008, 09:03 AM   #119
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Karachi rising

by ArabianBusiness.com staff writer on Wednesday, 16 July 2008

Sketch of the proposed tower.


Sketch illustrating windflow around the tower.


Transparent render of the tower.


A cross-section of the KPT tower.


Early sketch of the tower and its surroundings.


Site plan for the KPT tower.


Pakistan's biggest building will help the nation announce its arrival on the global stage.

In the Middle East, it's easy to get blasé about ‘iconic' buildings, which seem to spring up on a weekly basis. Other regions don't necessarily have the same economic power, the same business cache, or frankly, the same media coverage as the Gulf.

So when one of these other regions begins construction of a building that's nearly double the height of its current tallest, it's worth sitting up and taking notice of a genuine icon.

The busy port of Karachi, Pakistan, is home to around 17 million people and-because of population and myriad socio-political factors-is one of the more challenging places in the world to create a world-class design. Aedas' Karachi Port Trust (KPT) Tower Development is taking on those challenges, and may even help boost Pakistan's position on a world stage.

At 80 storeys high, the tower is a first for Pakistan, which has never built anything over 25 storeys. Aedas was selected via competition, largely because of their previous expertise in similar projects.

"We had to put forward a proposal of how we'd handle it and examples of previous designs, so the competition was in terms of the quality of the way we'd handle the project and execute it," explains David Kingdom, project director at Aedas.

Pakistan suffers from its share of both political and environmental instability, which means a project the size of the KPT Tower must be designed particularly sensitively in order to cope with the extremes to which both man and meteorology subject it.

"The biggest problem in Karachi during monsoons is that it gets flooded. Their drainage infrastructure can't cope with it," explains Kingdom.

Given that the building makes use of underground parking, it is particularly important for the project to have a sound strategy for preventing floodwater from entering the car parks. "You need a bundled perimeter and over the threshold runways you have these rising dams that block the entranceway," says Kingdom.

Other problems include the very real threat of an attack by any one of Pakistan's myriad militant groups. As the biggest building in the country, the KPT Tower could be considered a potential target during periods of social unrest.

With 12,000 people using the building on a daily basis and with most of them arriving and leaving during morning and evening peak hours, complex computer simulations had to be conducted to find out how best to monitor such vast numbers of people without causing delays.

To that end, the building will have 14 exits to cope with the potential numbers of people. "We simulated it about six times before we got it right. We had to enlarge the lobby area significantly to ensure that at peak rush hour, people weren't queuing outside," says Kingdom.

The building is to be constructed from reinforced concrete, which will undoubtedly provide challenges in and of itself. "I've never built anything this high in concrete," says Kingdom, who explains that getting an acceptable quality of concrete in Pakistan has traditionally been a problem as well. Concrete, after all, provides the building with a degree of fire-proofing-a vital component in a post-9/11 world and in a country familiar with both social and political conflict.

Adding to the challenges of building KPT Tower is its location on an active seismic zone. Because of the height of the building, a tune mass damper is required to keep the tower stable. "You need to put a pendulum arrangement on the upper floor of a building, which can be done with a mechanical weight, or as we're doing it, with a whole floor of water..." says Kingdom.

"[The water] is pumped from one side to another to compensate for the swaying of the building." The water floor also adds another component of fire safety to the building. "That tank is also used to pressurise the sprinkler system," explains Kingdom.

Efficient design

In keeping with the growing worldwide trend for sustainability, KPT Tower will also include a number of design features aimed at reducing energy use. However, Kingdom points out that a sustainable building is desirable in Pakistan from more than just a practical level. "The country is starved of energy supplies," he says. "Fortunately, the government is extremely conscious that natural resources are limited and [sustainability] has to happen."

As a result, the design of the building is based on information gained from a very intensive process of energy-saving simulation. "We have an advanced modelling group in our London office, which did some very complex simulations to look at the whole sun-path geometry of 365 days of the year, every hour of the day," explains Kingdom.

The results of the simulations mean that the building can have a completely shaded external envelope, which dramatically reduces the cooling load on the building.

The solar shading is provided by large cantilevered solar shades, some of which extend as much as five metres from the façade. Full solar shading also means that more glass can be used in the building's façade, which assists in the tower's durability.

"One of the design challenges within Karachi is that it's a marine atmosphere, which is very aggressive in terms of corrosion but there is also a high level of pollutants due to the traffic of 17 million people," explains Kingdom.

The shading also means that low-E glass can be used on most of the elevations.

Cooling for the building will be partially provided by the significant wind load from the Indian Ocean. "The vortices around the building have a continual circulation of moving air that keeps the surface glass temperature quite low," explains Kingdom. Plans also exist for a 40-metre wind turbine on the roof, although at this stage in the design, this feature is purely speculative pending an economic analysis.

The building's sustainability is further augmented through its water preservation and recycling systems.

Rainwater collection tanks are a standard feature in Pakistan and, according to Kingdom, grey water will be used for toilets and irrigation. "The outfall would also be recyclable for drinking, but we won't be doing that because of the psychological issues related to that," explains Kingdom.

The level of sustainability for KPT Tower will be evaluated by the UK's Building Research Establishment's Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM), with an aim for a rating of ‘Excellent'.

Danton Phillips, the commercial director for Aedas on the project, has indicated that US LEED and Abu Dhabi Estidama accreditation could also be considered since the building is intended to appeal to the global market.

Local knowledge

An important aim of the project is for KPT Tower to act as a springboard for future architectural development in Pakistan. ‘Knowledge transfer' has proved a particularly important part of the design process, and as a result, the Aedas design team worked very closely with local partner Ali Arshad Associates-soon to be Aedas Karachi-in order to create a design appropriate to the cultural context.

"We could have come in as an arrogant set of architects from outside, but instead we took them gently step by step," says Kingdom. Aedas also involved three eminent Pakistani architects, Tariq Hasan, Habib Fida Ali and Surti & Partners, to participate in design workshops. "That created a lot of cultural support because there were things there that we might have done wrong and not understood the culture quite right," says Kingdom.

Although the building has been designed and modelled through computer simulation, local architecture still played a vital role. According to Kingdom, the crown of the building is inspired by Islamic architecture.

The height of the building has meant adopting architectural protection strategies that have been used in other markets but are somewhat unusual in Pakistan. For example, every 18 floors, there is what Kingdom describes as a reinforced concrete ‘Catherine wheel', which provides a shelter point during a phased evacuation.

Those leaving the building can corral at these refuges before using a lift to escape the building if necessary. All of the lifts are contained in a thick high-density fire-resistant concrete core.

The extraordinary nature of this element meant Aedas faced some unforeseen challenges when dealing with the Karachi fire authorities. "The fire chief's first reaction to the building was that he doesn't have a fire tender with a ladder big enough," says Kingdom.

However, Aedas worked closely with the fire authorities to advance their abilities to deal with fires in tall buildings by explaining the design principles and evacuation policies.

That collaborative safety effort is consistent with the Aedas team's approach to the entire project. "[KPT Tower] is seen as a symbol that this country is coming together. [The Pakistani authorities] are extremely proud to be able to this," says Kingdom.

"During the process, we made a lot of friends with people like the governor, the lord mayor, the head of the building control authority and the fire authority," adds Kingdom. "We feel we've helped them grow and I know I've made some good friends who'll certainly assist us in mapping the way forward in the future."




Source: arabian Business
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Old August 25th, 2008, 03:33 PM   #120
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The KPT Tower and the Port Tower are two confusing projects.
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