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Old April 28th, 2007, 07:48 PM   #181
KM1410
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Originally Posted by CorrND View Post
Tough to really comment on that Indiana Ave development without hearing much in the way of details, but I'm glad it's going to include condos. However, they're planning another drive-through bank in downtown?! What's wrong with these people?
If its a drive-thru like the one in the zipper building, then it won't be terrible, but I also don't understand why drive-thrus keep getting approved in the mile square. Aren't there any sort of design guidelines for downtown?
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Old April 28th, 2007, 07:55 PM   #182
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another drive thru?! The zipper building one goes well with downtown, but how do we know we will be as lucky? Hopefully this building is either actually old looking with stone, or something cutting edge, but I assume we will probably either get a brick infill structure, or a glass cube.
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Old April 28th, 2007, 08:11 PM   #183
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Drive-thrus, campuses, and standalones have no place in the core of a major city.

The only drive-thru fast food that I know of in Chicago's entire core is a McDonalds on N. Clark and Ohio Streets--but at least that one was tastefully done.

Last edited by NaptownBoy; April 29th, 2007 at 09:09 AM.
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Old April 29th, 2007, 08:07 PM   #184
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Summer ground-breaking targeted for ‘500 Walnut’

A summer ground-breaking is expected for the Walnut, the nine-unit condominium project approved in April by the Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission.

The three-story project will be built on the now-vacant northeast corner of East and Walnut streets.

A more exact timetable can be set once the revised architectural plans are completed, said Bill Carlstedt, principal with Citimark Management Co.

He explained that project architect Mark Beebe, of James T. Kienle & Associates, is reworking the floor plans for new configuration after the project was downsized from 12 units to nine in response to neighborhood opposition.

Carlstedt describes the project as “a luxury garden-style condominium development with secure underground parking.” The project is also distinguished by the fact that there is direct elevator access into each of the nine units, with no hallways.

Each unit will also feature a wood-burning fireplace and exterior porch. Secure underground parking will feature two spaces for each unit.


The nine-unit condominium project known as 500 Walnut will stand at the northeast corner of East and Walnut streets. The luxury development features underground parking and irect elevator service into each residence.

500 Walnut gets nod from IHPC
Plans for the luxury “500 Walnut” project at the northeast corner of Walnut and East streets has been approved by the Indianapolis Historic Preservation Commission.

The project – a scaled-down version of plans presented at the IHPC’s February meeting – features nine condominiums with two enclosed parking spaces per unit.

The project, by Citimark Management Co., was approved at the IHPC’s April 4 hearing, with support from the Chatham Arch Neighborhood Association.

Commissioners especially noted the fact that the redesign resulted in the building being set back an additional six feet, as well as an improved parking ratio. In the previous design, there were 12 units and 20 parking spaces, less than two per unit.

The proposal, however, was still not without its critics. Chatham Arch resident Clayton Miller renewed his opposition based on the structure’s size in relationship with the lot.

“The building ignores the two historic structures that are immediately adjacent,” Miller said. He asked the commission to consider that the condo structure is not sensitive to the residential nature of the neighborhood, but is instead more consistent to the Massachusetts Avenue commercial district to the south.

Miller challenged IHPC staff’s position that the project was located on a “large site,” where larger structures are allowed. He said the site actually better fits into the “isolated lot” category, where guidelines are more stringent about the “context” of the surrounding structures.

The concerns of neighboring property owner Wayne Radford were also discussed, although Radford could not attend the April 4 hearing. Radford’s prime concern was that the large structure would cast too great a shadow on the historic house, but commissioners were satisfied by an architect’s “shadow study” which indicated that the new structure would cast less shadow on Radford’s house than Radford’s house casts on its neighbor to the north.

George Geib and Susan Williams, commissioners who voiced concerns over the project at the Feb. 7 meeting, said the changes satisfied their worries. Both voted for the project.

The approval included several variances for setback, floor area ratio, open space ratio, minimum livability space ratio and minimum major livability space ratio. The structure will feature a 31-foot, 5-inch setback from East Street and an 11-foot setback from Walnut Street. The north setback is one-foot to an open staircase and five feet to the building; the east setback is five feet.

Speaking for the Chatham Arch Neighborhood Association, Mark Porteous said the Urban Design Committee endorsed the project by an 8-1 vote, while the vote of the general membership was 37-4 with two absentions.

IHPC President James Kienle recused himself from the hearing because his firm is serving as architect for the project. Mark Beebe is the project architect.

http://brookspublications.com/files/500_WALNUT.pdf
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Old April 29th, 2007, 08:46 PM   #185
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That looks pretty neat; thanks for posting.

Attractive design, multiple stories, underground parking. I'm impressed.
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Old April 29th, 2007, 09:47 PM   #186
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arenn View Post
Pratically every fully pedestrianized street in the US has been viewed as a failure. The aforementioned 4th Street Live project is the remains of a 70's pedestrian mall that was viewed as a complete failure in Louisville. They took their formerly main shopping street and closed it to traffic, but it was a disaster. The project that installed 4th Street Live opened up quite a bit of the street back to traffic. The only reason that there is a section still closed is that the city had built a shopping mall called the Galleria right in the middle of the street that couldn't easily be demolished.

Similarly, Chicago turned State St. into a pedestrian mall and transitway in the 1970's - another total failure that had to be redone at great expense.

Closing the Circle to traffic, except on select occasions, is a really, really bad idea.
3rd Street Promenade in Santa Monica, CA is successful today, but it wasn't always the case. There were many years where the businesses that lined the corridor struggled financially. Over the last few years, the tenant mix has changed dramatically, shifting from small, independently-owned shops to upscale national chain retail stores. I think a major reason for the success today is due to the large number of tourists that visit the area. It has basically become a tourist destination for people visiting Los Angeles.

On this same note - a recommended reading for anyone interested in urban planning is "The Death and Life of Great American Cities" by Jane Jacobs (aka the bible of urban planning). The author presents some pretty interesting considerations regarding the connection between vehicular traffic and the pedestrian.
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Old April 30th, 2007, 12:07 AM   #187
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Good news on that residential project.

As far as pedestrian streets are concerned, 16th Street in Denver and Fremont Street in Las Vegas are both pretty successful.

The key is to have a good pedestrian oriented downtown to begin with.
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Old April 30th, 2007, 12:35 AM   #188
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great project, the residential boom continues in downtown.
For pedestrian life, I heard that elemination of curbs really helps, and using the sort of concrete things they have on the circle. Greenery really helps, and bricking of streets.
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Old April 30th, 2007, 04:07 PM   #189
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That's a nice residential project at Walnut Street, but I am SO SICK of Nimby's complaining about the massing of every project in the City's core. ITS A FREAKING DOWNTOWN!!! If you want to live in a medium-density area, I suggest Irvington or Cumberland. Otheriwse, shut-up!
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Old April 30th, 2007, 04:43 PM   #190
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Couple updates around downtown from this weekend:

1. Fairbanks Hall is going up fast! They're already to 4+ stories. Out of curiosity, does anybody know what factors are taken into account to decide when to use concrete vs. steel frame construction? The IU Health Information and Translational Sciences Building (formerly Medical Information Science Building) is basically the same height and used concrete while Fairbanks is steel frame. Is it just $$?

2. After looking in the windows, Buggs Temple is still quite a ways off from being opened.

3. The Cultural Trail is already rolling, with the east lane of Alabama completely shut down. Can't wait until we see some finished sections. . .
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Old April 30th, 2007, 08:47 PM   #191
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Well my hope is this sexy summer we can see the groundbreaking of some MUCH anticipated projects! i.e. the JWub Plaza, Penn Tower, that Canal Development etc. etc. etc...
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Old April 30th, 2007, 09:02 PM   #192
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Well my hope is this sexy summer we can see the groundbreaking of some MUCH anticipated projects! i.e. the JWub Plaza, Penn Tower, that Canal Development etc. etc. etc...
That would be nice. I plan on regularly going downtown this summer and monitoring the progress of these projects.
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Old May 1st, 2007, 04:39 AM   #193
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Summer City Road Projects

From the IndyStar:

New Downtown interstate ramps and a widening of Georgetown Road are among the summer street projects announced by the city today.

This year’s summer construction season plan even has its own name – “The Road Home.” There’s even a website with all the details: www.indygov.org/TheRoadHome/.

“Construction season is just underway in Marion County and the city is excited about many of this summer’s projects, including the removal of the Market Street ramp to improving the safety of several intersections,” Kumar Menon, director of the Department of Public Works, said in a news release.

At the top of the list is the plan to widen Georgetown Road from Lafayette Road to 56th Street to four lanes. Storm sewers, curbs and a sidewalk are also in the plan.

Other projects this summer, from the city’s news release:

- Market Street Ramp Project: Bidding is this summer and construction begins in the fall. Includes construction of new from I-65/I-70 to Washington Street and the demolition of the Market Street on-ramp – dubbed the “ski ramp.” Should be complete in the fall of 2008.

- 10th Street and Shadeland Avenue: Northbound Shadeland will be widened south of the intersection to include a dedicated right-turn lane onto 10th Street,” the city news release said. “The south side of 10th Street just east of the intersection will be widened to add a new right turn lane onto Shadeland Avenue. The traffic signal will also be upgraded to new energy efficient L.E.D. lights. Construction is expected to begin in the fall of 2007 and finish in the spring of 2008.

- The Dean Road Bridge over Howland Ditch just north of 75th Street will be replaced.

- Michigan Street, Morris Street, Holt Road & Kentucky Avenue Signal System: Upgrading traffic signals on the Southwest side.

- South Emerson Avenue, between Churchman Avenue to Raymond Street. Will extend the useful service life of the existing pavement, rehabilitate the bridge over Lick Creek and provide for improved drainage along South Emerson.

- Michigan Road and 86th Street Safety Improvements: “There are several specific safety improvements that will be made to the intersection, including the elimination of a median opening on the west side of the intersection as well as six driveways near the intersection. To help increase visibility, the pavement will be re-striped and the signs relocated. Plus, right turn arrow signal phases will be added along with advanced pedestrian crossing signs. Construction began in April 2007 and is estimated to be complete in summer 2007.”

- Indianapolis Cultural Trail: “A world-class urban bike and pedestrian path that connects neighborhoods, Cultural Districts and entertainment amenities, and serves as the downtown hub for the entire central Indiana greenway system. The five downtown cultural districts connected by the Indianapolis Cultural Trail include Fountain Square, Indiana Avenue, Mass Ave, The Canal & White River State Park, and the Wholesale District. The Cultural Trail will also connect with the Monon Trail, allowing visitors easy access to Broad Ripple Village from downtown. Construction on the east corridor is underway; the project is expected to be complete in late 2009.”
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Old May 1st, 2007, 07:13 AM   #194
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Cameras...

Ok, is anyone else annoyed by the ugly surveillance cameras that the city is installing downtown? I'm fine with cameras, however, is it really necessary to have blue flashing lights, antennas, cables, and transformer boxes. Seriously, could these things be any more conspicuous? Are we trying to make our downtown look like a police state?

If we were serious about fighting crime, we would install inconspicuous cameras and then actually catch criminals and prosecute aggressive panhandlers. My guess is that these ridiculous cameras will only move criminal activity to the next block without a camera.

Have you guys seen these things?

Any thoughts?
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Old May 1st, 2007, 10:19 AM   #195
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thehoss257 View Post
Ok, is anyone else annoyed by the ugly surveillance cameras that the city is installing downtown? I'm fine with cameras, however, is it really necessary to have blue flashing lights, antennas, cables, and transformer boxes. Seriously, could these things be any more conspicuous? Are we trying to make our downtown look like a police state?

If we were serious about fighting crime, we would install inconspicuous cameras and then actually catch criminals and prosecute aggressive panhandlers. My guess is that these ridiculous cameras will only move criminal activity to the next block without a camera.

Have you guys seen these things?

Any thoughts?
The only one I know of is on Michigan Street and they've been effective in catching crimes. Where else are they?
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Old May 1st, 2007, 01:54 PM   #196
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500 Walnut was originally a 16 unit proposal, I believe. It should come as no surprise that street life is absent in so much of downtown when it ends up getting built out at lower densities than some newer developments in Carmel.
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Old May 1st, 2007, 01:54 PM   #197
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The only one I know of is on Michigan Street and they've been effective in catching crimes. Where else are they?
There is one at Penn and Maryland and I know I've seen more.
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Old May 1st, 2007, 04:37 PM   #198
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American Lung Association Rates Indy as one of the Dirtiest Cities

The IndyStar had an article today about the fact that the American Lung Association ranked Indianapolis in the Top 10 in cities with the worst air quality. This can't be good for marketing or development.

Indy needs to start a massive tree planting campaign, which is what Atlanta did in the early 1990s.

This problem won't go away on its own.
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Old May 1st, 2007, 05:04 PM   #199
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosier View Post
The IndyStar had an article today about the fact that the American Lung Association ranked Indianapolis in the Top 10 in cities with the worst air quality. This can't be good for marketing or development.

Indy needs to start a massive tree planting campaign, which is what Atlanta did in the early 1990s.

This problem won't go away on its own.
Trees would help, although Indy strikes me as a forested city already. Stricter auto emission controls would definitely help; smaller yards (mowers) and stricter controls on coal fired plants would also help. The only way we are going to get a handle on the environmental problems, in the end, is not "doing more for" the environment, but "doing less" - driving less, mowing less, consuming less.
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Old May 1st, 2007, 05:13 PM   #200
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thehoss257 View Post
Ok, is anyone else annoyed by the ugly surveillance cameras that the city is installing downtown? I'm fine with cameras, however, is it really necessary to have blue flashing lights, antennas, cables, and transformer boxes. Seriously, could these things be any more conspicuous? Are we trying to make our downtown look like a police state?

If we were serious about fighting crime, we would install inconspicuous cameras and then actually catch criminals and prosecute aggressive panhandlers. My guess is that these ridiculous cameras will only move criminal activity to the next block without a camera.

Have you guys seen these things?

Any thoughts?
I was in Chicago and Evanston a couple weeks ago and I saw a few of those cameras as well. The only one I've seen around here is at Michigan and Rural (probably the same one billionbucks mentioned) and it looks exactly the same as the ones in Chicago. That doesn't mean they're not an eyesore, but at least we're not alone in having them.

I haven't seen the one you mentioned at Penn and Maryland, but maybe that was a reaction to the abduction and rape a couple months ago? I can't remember exactly where that happened, but I think it was around there. I gotta think that the city would generally really like to keep these out of the core. That one was probably an exception to make people feel safer. An inconspicuous camera wouldn't make people feel safer.
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