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Old May 12th, 2007, 01:28 AM   #381
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What is that building behind the State Capital? An old Government center or something?
Yeah, its the state gov't center. The building is still there, it was renovated in the early 90s.
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Old May 12th, 2007, 06:51 PM   #382
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Very interesting...no wonder Flaherty didn't submit

Rescue for MSA fell short
Developer was set to take on troubled project last fall, then talks with city fizzled

A high-profile local firm that quietly negotiated last fall to salvage the stalled redevelopment of the Market Square Arena site abandoned its plans when the city decided instead to solicit new proposals early this year.

The firm, Flaherty & Collins Properties, has experience in just the kind of high-rise development Mayor Bart Peterson’s office has sought for the four-acre site. Among its current projects is a 50-story condo tower in downtown Charlotte, N.C.

City officials last year asked for input from a handful of local developers, including Flaherty, after they grew frustrated by a lack of progress on Market Square and began looking for ways to revive the project.

Flaherty, an unsuccessful bidder for the MSA site in February 2003, has shown the wherewithal to develop high-rise projects without presale requirements—a financing hang-up that ultimately sunk the winning bidder’s proposal for a 31-story residential tower.

All of Flaherty & Collins’ discussions with the city and the original development team, Market Square Partners LP, were behind the scenes, so it isn’t clear why negotiations fizzled.

Prominent local developers familiar with the discussions said Flaherty had secured financing and was ready to roll before it learned of the city’s decision. The developers, who spoke to IBJ on condition of anonymity fearing a backlash from the city or Flaherty, said the company felt snubbed after investing time and resources to put its plan together.

With Flaherty on the sidelines, only two development teams submitted bids last month.

Flaherty officials declined to comment for this story. A spokesman for Mayor Peterson, Justin Ohlemiller, confirmed the discussions with Flaherty took place, but he would not elaborate.

“There was progress made,” he acknowledged. “But ultimately, it didn’t yield a project.”

Ohlemiller said Flaherty had sought city incentives—a perk the original developers had not received. He said the introduction of incentives, along with other factors, played into the eventual decision to reopen bidding. The two bidders now vying for the project—development teams known as Market Centre Partners and Market-Ability Partners—also want incentives.

Said Ohlemiller: “It was a negotiation. It didn’t work out. Our focus is on moving forward.”

Seeking help for Smoot

In August 2006, the city announced it was working on a “restructured development plan” for MSA with new developers. At the time, the city said the new developers, which it did not name, would work in partnership with Market Square Partners, a team led by Columbus, Ohiobased Smoot Construction. Smoot officials did not return phone messages seeking comment.

The city gave Smoot multiple chances to remain involved, realizing the substantial investment the company had sunk in the project, including a $1 million nonrefundable deposit and its purchase of a parking garage and a vacant bank building. The city also had hoped to ink a deal that wouldn’t require public subsidies.

“Our goal was to try and make it work with Smoot,” said Jim Garrard, the city’s economic development director. “We wanted to give them every opportunity to make it happen.”

But because Smoot never closed on the MSA site, the city retained ownership, along with the authority to iron out a new development plan and bring other developers on board if necessary, Ohlemiller said.

At least two local developers, Flaherty & Collins and Kosene & Kosene Residential Inc., were asked for ideas on how to salvage the project. City officials confirmed they called on other developers but would not say whom.

Kosene & Kosene Managing Partner Gerry Kosene said his firm’s meeting in the mayor’s offices lasted about 45 minutes.

“They were trying to make it happen, which I thought was smart of them to do,” Kosene said. “They were hitting a headwall, apparently.”

During the meeting, Kosene shared his stance that the project wouldn’t work without a city subsidy. His sense was the city was on a “fishing expedition” to find “a marriage that worked for Smoot.” After the meeting, Kosene didn’t hear another word.

He said he doubts conversations between the city and Flaherty went as far as other developers characterized.

“Why would the city turn that down?” Kosene asked. “I firmly believe that if Flaherty & Collins had the project financed, the city would have found a way to do a deal.”

Experience avoiding presales

Flaherty typically lines up private investors to get around presales requirements on its projects, including the Charlotte condo tower that’s under construction. In that project, the developer got help from longtime backers, including House Investments, an Indianapolis firm that lines up investors for real estate projects.

“We’re big on being able to start construction and then start sales,” principal David Flaherty told IBJ in December. He did not return phone messages for this story.

A director at House Investments, Patrick O’Connor, said Flaherty had been in contact with the firm about financing to revive the MSA project. O’Connor called the company “pretty bankable.”

“They told us they were in talks, but never sent a package,” he said.

The company’s original 2003 proposal called for two identical six-story buildings north and south of Market Street. The $43 million project called for 292 luxury multifamily units, along with ground-floor retail and open space for public gatherings.

In all, six development teams submitted proposals. The winner, chosen in February 2004, was a $140 million project with a 22-story residential tower. It was proposed by Smoot and locally based Shrewsberry & Associates LLC.

The team struggled from the start. The developers eventually retooled the plan, bringing in a Chicago developer and pushing the proposed tower taller. But liens from unpaid bills piled up, and they failed to presell enough units to secure financing.

Both of the current bidders say city incentives are essential to make their projects viable. Neither has revealed how much it’s seeking.

Market Centre Partners, which consists of Kosene, locally based Pedcor Cos. and Smoot, is proposing a $130 million project with a 21-story tower and a 15-story tower.

The other bidder, Market-Ability Partners, includes Mansur Real Estate Services Inc., Lauth, Hearthview Residential Inc. and Venture Real Estate Services. That group’s $150 million plan calls for a 14-story tower and a Target.

Shortly before the latest deadline for bids, Flaherty Vice President for Development Jim Crossin told IBJ the company had no plans to bid again. He said the company didn’t want to compete with potential future partners. •
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Old May 12th, 2007, 07:05 PM   #383
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The Experts are Liking Indy's/Irsays Chances to Host 2011 Bowl

What are the chances?
Super Bowl hinges on whether owners like Irsay or Jones


Bringing a Super Bowl to Indianapolis might have little to do with weather, hotel rooms or posh practice facilities.

The biggest factor is likely to be Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay, and how other National Football League owners feel about him and the contributions he has made to their tightknit club.

Most observers think Dallas and Indianapolis are runaway front-runners to host the 2011 Super Bowl, with Glendale, Ariz., a distant third.

Owners will absolutely want the $25 million lined up by the host city to run the Super Bowl and thousands of top-tier hotel rooms within an easy limo ride of a spiffy stadium, but once league officials assure them those elements are in place, the decision will come down to Irsay vs. Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones.

Jones is no tackling-dummy opponent. Sure, he initially rankled some feathers by brokering his own marketing and sales deals and pushing the envelope to keep more money out of the league till and in his own pocket.

But he also raised the tide for all ships, showing teams how to maximize corporate and fan revenue in ways other owners had never considered. Since becoming an NFL owner in 1989, Jones has amassed considerable political clout, while fielding three Super Bowl champions.

Irsay, 47, has been amassing his lobbying arsenal far longer. Irsay’s dad, Robert, entered the league in 1972, and Jim became a big part of the franchise after it moved to Indianapolis in 1984. He served as general manager and chief operating officer before taking over full ownership in 1997.

While Jones has gained attention with bold moves and a flashy—some say obnoxious—panache, Irsay has been more apt to shun the league’s brightest spotlights, and he rarely makes moves that show up fellow owners.

Irsay serves on the Executive Committee of the league’s Management Council, one of the NFL’s most prestigious working groups. He also serves on the Super Bowl Policy Committee.

Irsay gets high marks from many owners—particularly those in small and midsize markets—for his work on the collective bargaining agreement with players and revenue sharing among owners.

Irsay also has the respect of longtime owners such as the New York Giants’ Mara family, Pittsburgh’s Rooney family and the Halas-McCaskey bunch in Chicago.

“These days, when Jim Irsay talks, people listen,” said Marv Levy, former Buffalo Bills coach and now the team’s vice president of football operations. “He has a strong presence among league owners and executives.”

The value of that can’t be underestimated say those inside the NFL’s inner circle. What isn’t known and is seldom talked about is the intensity of lobbying among owners for the Super Bowl site.

“If you start at the very beginning, it’s about the owner … those relationships first,” said Susan Scherer, who ran Detroit’s 2006 Super Bowl host committee. “There are 32 decision makers.”

Irsay plays down the notion of a personal battle between him and Jones, but makes no bones about his lobbying efforts.

“A lot of these [owners] I’ve known for 35 years, and I have a track record with them,” Irsay said. “Some of these owners are close personal friends, but it goes beyond that. When I’ve supported them, I’ve said, ‘Hey, don’t forget us.’ Now, I’ll be reminding them of that. Sometimes the heart strings come into play, and it can be a very emotional decision.”

Back-room deals?

Irsay and Jones, sources said, have already chatted up every team owner individually to try to sway votes. And it’s likely there will be more arm-twisting before the 2011 Super Bowl site selection vote on May 22 at the owners’ meetings in Nashville, Tenn.

After the city delegations are asked to leave the room, the potential host owners get one last chance to make an impassioned pitch before the other owners.

Team owners are tight-lipped about the matter. Most won’t talk about the subject. Those that will, won’t attach their name to a quote.

“There isn’t an owner in the league who’s about to say publicly they’re for or against Jim Irsay or Jerry Jones,” said one West Coast NFL team owner. “Both men have made their mark on this league. But I have to tell you, if it comes down to a popularity contest, I like Jim Irsay’s chances. But this can get pretty complicated. There’s a lot of ‘I’ll scratch your back you scratch mine,’ mentality here on a number of levels. Back-room deals and under-the-table handshakes? You bet.”

Many owners will voice support to both parties.

“A lot of [owners] will give us encouraging words, but I know that’s not a commitment,” Irsay said. “The stomach will be churning when the secret ballots go into the hat.”

Others on Indianapolis’ and Dallas’ Super Bowl bid teams also will be involved, most notably Indianapolis Motor Speedway President Tony George for Indianapolis and former Cowboys quarterback and Hall of Famer Roger Staubach for Dallas. But the highest-level lobbying is not the sort of task an owner can delegate.

“This is an elite club, and there are a lot of small-group dynamics at play,” said Mark Rosentraub, a sports economist and author of “Major League Losers,” a book about professional sports operations. “Jim and Jerry won’t leave this task to underlings.”

Owners want to assure the Super Bowl maximizes its revenue and benefit to the league, but the decision goes much deeper.

“Some of this comes down to politics. … How much do NFL owners want Jerry Jones to have a Super Bowl? And the same thing with [Jim Irsay]—how much do they feel they owe the Colts owner? That’s the unfortunate part about it. Forget about how well the city would do at hosting the event. It could come down to politics and how the votes line up,” said Lee A. Esckilsen, president of Rhode Island-based Entertainment & Sports Consulting.

The host city’s NFL team gets no extra financial benefit. All ticket, suite, concession and other ancillary revenue goes to the league. But there is real cache among owners for landing such a prized possession, and it also helps them land new publicly financed stadiums, as the Super Bowl is dangled as a carrot before city and state officials.

The payoff to the host city comes in the form of a $300 million economic impact, according to Pricewaterhouse-Coopers, about five times that of an NCAA Final Four.

“We’re a part of the fabric of this community,” Irsay said. “I feel a great obligation to this city and state. We want to see it grow and succeed.”

Birth of a political process

In the league’s first 15 years, there was a short list of Super Bowl sites. Los Angeles, Miami and New Orleans hosted all but one Super Bowl. Houston hosted the other.

But as the game grew in stature and economic impact, more cities clamored for it. During years 16 through 25, four new hosts were introduced. As years passed, cities like Detroit, Minnesota and Atlanta found themselves in the mix.

Then Jacksonville Jaguars owner Wayne Weaver showed it really is about the owner in the prospective host city, when the Florida city became one of the most unlikely Super Bowl hosts in 2005.

Weaver, like Irsay, is well-liked among fellow owners. So when Weaver called his fellow owners to passionately and shamelessly lobby them in 2000, they listened.

“Forget that the market was too small, the downtown lacked a vibrant entertainment district, the airport didn’t have enough flights, and the lack of hotel rooms meant they had to use cruise ships on the St. Johns River as floating hotels,” said Marc Ganis, president of Chicago-based Sportscorp Ltd., which works closely as a consultancy for several NFL teams. “That shows that the owner in the [potential] host city is critically important.”

Others take it a step further.

“If you tell me Jacksonville got the Super Bowl predicated on their bid, I’m telling you you’re nuts,” Jim Steeg, the former longtime NFL senior vice president of special events and Super Bowl caretaker told the St. Petersburg Times. “Wayne Weaver was 95 percent of what it took to get that done.”

The Ford family, owners of the Detroit Lions, were the first to gain backing from the owners for a northern Super Bowl back in 1982, but they also had the Ford Motor Co.—one of the NFL’s largest sponsors and advertisers—behind the effort.

Irsay, of course, doesn’t have that kind of leverage.

NCAA Final Four becomes factor

“The one piece of leverage that Jim Irsay does have is the NCAA,” said Sportscorp.’s Ganis, who has attended every owners’ meeting for a decade.

“A lot of NFL owners want to bring a Final Four to their venue, and getting [NCAA President] Myles Brand or [NCAA Senior Vice President for Basketball and Business Strategies] Greg Shaheen involved could be a very big factor.”

NCAA officials did not return calls seeking comment.

While Indianapolis has proved it can host big sporting events, Ganis said without Irsay, Indianapolis isn’t a part of the 2011 Super Bowl discussion.

“I think Indianapolis is going to surprise some people,” said Eddie White, who, as Reebok’s vice president of team operations, deals with all 32 NFL teams. “With everything I hear, from the national media and team executives, they’re a lot more excited about Indianapolis than cities like Detroit and Jacksonville.

“And I think Jim will be enough to push the effort over the goal line.” •

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Old May 12th, 2007, 07:13 PM   #384
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What Does the NFL "Need?"

Indianapolis’ offer on the table



City boosters have spent months lining up hotel rooms and party venues, drafting plans to handle transportation and traffic, raising awareness along with the $25 million they think it will take to stage the 2011 Super Bowl.

Their goal: to put together a knock’em-dead bid that shows Indianapolis could be home to the greatest spectacle in football. In the end, though, whether the city wins the lucrative event could come down to two things organizers have little control over—weather and NFL politics.

Team owners cast the 32 votes that determine who gets the estimated $250 million boost that comes with hosting the big game and related events. And their decision doesn’t have much to do with hotel rooms and transportation plans.

“In my history, they never really asked many questions about that stuff,” said Jim Steeg, the league’s Super Bowl guru for more than two decades and now the San Diego Chargers’ chief operating officer. “They don’t really understand it. Nor should they.”

That’s the role of the NFL staff, which evaluates the technical aspects of bids and works to make sure the event could be staged in whichever city the owners choose. Three candidates are vying for their vote this year: Indianapolis, Dallas and Glendale, Ariz.

And the warm-weather competition brings the other wild card to the table.

“Indianapolis definitely has the facilities, the capability to host it,” said Robert Tuchman, president of New York City-based hospitality firm TSE Sports & Entertainment. “But it isn’t a destination like Miami, San Diego or New Orleans. Are people going to want to go to Indianapolis in February?”

Organizers of the local bid acknowledge the challenges, but they’re focusing on the factors they can influence. And they are optimistic the experience Indianapolis offers will sway the owners when they vote May 22.

“We have a very compelling story, which we tell well in our bid and our presentation,” said Fred Glass, a partner at Baker & Daniels who is leading the Indianapolis 2011 effort. “All the things we can control are going great.”

Slam dunk?

Specifics of the written bid and 15-minute multimedia extravaganza, to be delivered just before the vote, are being kept under wraps to avoid giving the competition any insight. But there’s little doubt they address a host of NFL requirements—and then some.

A copy of a draft bid prepared by Jacksonville, Fla., in 2000 illustrates the kind of details the league asks potential host cities to provide, from the electrical capacity of the stadium to plans for airport welcome centers.

One item likely is missing from Indianapolis’ bid, though: information on greens fees and other costs at three 18-hole golf courses requested for Super Bowlrelated events.

“We told the NFL they can have full run of all the golf courses in central Indiana,” Glass said, smiling at the thought of such an outing in February.

In all seriousness, the NFL asks for a lot and observers said the requirements are only getting more extensive with time. Socalled “enhancements” offered by past host cities to sweeten the pot are now standard, raising the bar for Indianapolis and others.

When Detroit hosted the game in 2006, for example, it had to secure space for the NFL’s sponsor-laden corporate tailgate party but wasn’t required to foot the bill. Would-be host cities now must agree to cover that expense.

“We provided all the transportation for the teams, the hotels for the teams. Those were enhancements,” said Detroit host committee chief Susan Sherer. “Now, they’re part of a host city’s responsibilities.”

Exactly how Indianapolis responded to such requests remains to be seen; Glass expects the bid to be publicly released after the vote, regardless of the outcome. But observers in Indianapolis and elsewhere agree that the city shouldn’t have much trouble giving the NFL what it wants, one way or another.

“When you look at Indianapolis’ ability to handle the game, from an event-management standpoint, it’s a slam dunk,” said Lee A. Esckilsen, an associate professor at Rhode Island-based Johnson & Wales University’s Center for Sports, Recreation and Event Management. “The other two cities can’t even come close.”

Esckilsen, who received his master’s degree in sports management at Indiana University in 1982, cited the success of the Indianapolis 500 each year and the city’s status as a regular home to the NCAA’s Final Four basketball championship as proof of Indianapolis’ capabilities.

Super Bowl Village

Indeed, the city’s experience with other large events is a distinct advantage when it comes to lining up nuts-and-bolts bid components like hotel rooms.

The NFL’s hotel requirements vary from city to city—the minimum number is equal to 35 percent of the maximum stadium capacity; in Indianapolis’ case, that means identifying 25,500 “quality” rooms within an hour’s drive of the game.

No problem, said Todd Greenwood, a group marketing manager at the Indianapolis Convention & Visitors Association. By 2011, the city will have nearly 7,000 top-tier rooms downtown and 22,455 in the metropolitan area. Factor in nearby locations like Bloomington, Columbus, Lafayette, Muncie and Terre Haute, and the number surpasses 34,000.



“You can be in Lafayette in less than an hour,” Greenwood said. “In Miami [site of the 2007 game], you could drive an hour and only go 14 or 15 miles.”

To be part of the NFL block, hotels had to guarantee availability and allow the league to set room rates, which will include a 10-percent Super Bowl premium, which the hotels will keep, and a 15-percent surcharge shared by the host committee and the NFL.

“Hats off to our state and the way our industry works here,” Greenwood said. “We put the rooms together with only two formal meetings.”

Glass and others point to the large downtown hotel block as an ace in the hole for Indianapolis. If planned hotel construction proceeds as expected, Indianapolis will have more than 4,500 rooms physically connected to the convention center/stadium complex. And the nearby bars, restaurants and even museums should eliminate some potential traffic and transportation challenges.

“This downtown was literally built to host events,” said Glass, also president of the county’s Capital Improvement Board. “Our No. 1 advantage is the vibrancy and urgency that is downtown. … The Mile Square could become Super Bowl Village.”

Indianapolis’ competitors for the 2011 game can’t say the same thing. Both Dallas and Arizona are making regional bids, a necessity since their stadiums aren’t in major cities. The Cowboys’ new stadium is going up 20 miles away in Arlington, Texas. The Cardinals play in Glendale, 10 miles outside Phoenix.

Lucas Oil Stadium’s urban location isn’t its only advantage. Set to open in 2008, the retractable-roof venue still will be one of the league’s newest stadiums when the 2011 game is played.

Because it’s being built to accommodate a multitude of functions, it has amenities the NFL wants, like extra locker rooms and ample event space.

Another plus for Indianapolis is its massive volunteer base that regularly helps with major events like the Final Four. Glass said the host committee likely would need 6,000 to 8,000 volunteers for the Super Bowl.

Bring on the tents

Glass is quick to downplay weather as a factor, pointing out that Indianapolis is used to handling snow or ice—as it did when 5 inches of snow fell the day of the AFC Championship this year. As he and others like to say, at least we know it won’t rain on the field like it did in Miami.

“Let’s put this in context,” he said. “Yes, it’s cold here in February. But it’s not International Falls, Minn. The average high is 39 degrees and we average 6-1/2 days when it is over 50 degrees.”

Even so, the weather does create other challenges. The NFL requires host cities to provide two comparable practice facilities for the Super Bowl teams; because our average temperature is less than 50 degrees, both must be enclosed.

Same goes for the 750,000-square-foot NFL Experience interactive theme park. And the 800,000-square-foot Tailgate Party. And the 150,000-square-foot venue where the commissioner will hold his Friday night party.

City boosters are undeterred.

“We can be creative,” said Indianapolis event planner Maribeth Smith, whose namesake firm has organized some of the city’s largest events. “We could tent Pan Am Plaza, turn the ice skating rinks into event space. We could tent entire streets, tent the Circle. Something this large requires us to think outside of the box, and we can do that.” •
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Old May 12th, 2007, 07:38 PM   #385
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I don't know about the rest of you, but just reading these articles gets me really excited about have the Super Bowl in Indy. It would be HUGE for this city.

I also have dollar signs in my eyes with the idea of renting out my house to out-of-towners!
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Old May 12th, 2007, 09:17 PM   #386
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I don't know about the rest of you, but just reading these articles gets me really excited about have the Super Bowl in Indy. It would be HUGE for this city.

I also have dollar signs in my eyes with the idea of renting out my house to out-of-towners!

sweet idea, I could lay beds in my dining room and charge them $100 each! big money!!!!
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Old May 13th, 2007, 01:07 AM   #387
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That sounds like absolute hell, and no way worth the money. Let a bunch of out of town drunks who don't give a flying **** about you or your property crash in your house... right.. I've got a couple apartments I could possibly see renting out, but not my personal space.
Of course, I would put plastic on the walls and floor(and ceiling) barrackade all my rooms, and put all my things in another room.
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Old May 13th, 2007, 10:02 PM   #388
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That sounds like absolute hell, and no way worth the money. Let a bunch of out of town drunks who don't give a flying **** about you or your property crash in your house... right.. I've got a couple apartments I could possibly see renting out, but not my personal space.
Yeah, you have to wonder if all this superbowl stuff is really just a distraction. It is just a one day event, is it worth all the effort? I'm not opposed to it, and I think It would be a cool thing to see our city in the limelight. I just get a little nervous when our elected officials are more interested in these types of things rather than developing a strong vision for our city's built environment.

Oh well, I don't want us to an argument on the merits of the Superbowl bid. It really isn't an either or thing.
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Old May 13th, 2007, 10:07 PM   #389
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By the way, I just heard that the city is going to put bike lanes on New York and Michigan Streets on the east side. I live on Dearborn Street between Washington and New York on the near east side and would love to see this happen. Do any of you know about this and/or know when it will happen?
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Old May 13th, 2007, 10:16 PM   #390
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By the way, I just heard that the city is going to put bike lanes on New York and Michigan Streets on the east side. I live on Dearborn Street between Washington and New York on the near east side and would love to see this happen. Do any of you know about this and/or know when it will happen?
IIRC, the latest word on the New York/Michigan bike lanes was a slight delay in the start of construction.

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I just get a little nervous when our elected officials are more interested in these types of things rather than developing a strong vision for our city's built environment.
That's a fair concern, but at this point, how involved in the bid are elected officials? I thought a group was incorporated to make the bid and that community business leaders were largely involved.
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Old May 13th, 2007, 10:32 PM   #391
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From Property Lines, Cory Schouten posted:

Cory Says:
May 13th, 2007 at 12:17 pm
Stay tuned. There’s a hearing scheduled this week on JW Marriott.
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Old May 13th, 2007, 11:25 PM   #392
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Sorry if anyone has answered this, but what are they doing with One Indiana Square? I heard they are completely remodeling the outside, making the building look more modernized.
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Old May 13th, 2007, 11:28 PM   #393
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Yeah, you have to wonder if all this superbowl stuff is really just a distraction. It is just a one day event, is it worth all the effort? I'm not opposed to it, and I think It would be a cool thing to see our city in the limelight. I just get a little nervous when our elected officials are more interested in these types of things rather than developing a strong vision for our city's built environment.

Oh well, I don't want us to an argument on the merits of the Superbowl bid. It really isn't an either or thing.
How do you think the government should be more involved in the built environment...?
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Old May 14th, 2007, 12:42 AM   #394
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What kind of hearing? What are the implications of this?
Who knows. I couldn't find any info at indygov.org. I asked on the blog if he knew whether it would be a public hearing.
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Old May 14th, 2007, 04:50 PM   #395
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Unionstation13, CWilson, Moochie, you 3 are downtown a lot. The IBJ real estate beat reporter posted last Friday:

Let me know what you see. Notice a new project or for-sale sign? Leave me a comment, and I’ll try to find out what’s going on. What have you seen lately?

It appears as though he needs a few extra eyes for Indy development. I work downtown so I have the NE part of the business district covered. He just needs to read SSP and SSC's forums.
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Old May 14th, 2007, 04:53 PM   #396
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicagoland312 View Post
Sorry if anyone has answered this, but what are they doing with One Indiana Square? I heard they are completely remodeling the outside, making the building look more modernized.
I started a thread at SSP for this. I happen to work at the Regions Bank Tower. http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/showthread.php?t=128548
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Old May 14th, 2007, 05:55 PM   #397
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Quote:
Originally Posted by billionbucks View Post
How do you think the government should be more involved in the built environment...?
Well, I would love to see our city scrap the current zoning code and replace it with a form based code. The type of code that would make the suburban crap difficult and the walkable, mixed-use stuff easy. We have exactly the opposite with our current zoning code.

Next, the city should get serious on a regional transit system that would use Union Station as the system hub. Overlay districts should be created at each transit stop that would require transit oriented development.

The city should make strategic Infrastructure improvements and then create a bold vision for the type of development that surrounds those improvements. For example, Turn Washington Street into a two-way grand boulevard and encourage and incentivize buildings with street front retail, and massing that is consistent the idea that Washington Street is our Main St.

The city should offer consistent tax incentives to any developer that constructs buildings within the CBD or other overlay districts that are consistent with our previously specified urban design guidelines. We also need to stop pissing off our developers by pitting them against each other and giving some developers millions in tax incentives and other developers nothing.
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Old May 14th, 2007, 05:56 PM   #398
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Sorry for the duplication!

Last edited by thehoss257; May 14th, 2007 at 11:10 PM.
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Old May 14th, 2007, 06:00 PM   #399
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moochie -- here's Cory's response:

Cory Says:
May 14th, 2007 at 8:52 am
CorrND, yes. There’s a public hearing scheduled for 1 p.m. Wednesday on the agreement between the developers and the city.


According to indygov.org, this is the only hearing at 1pm on Wednesday, so this must be it:

Title: MDC Meeting
Date: Wednesday, May 16, 2007

Time: 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.
Calendar: Metropolitan Development Commission
Contact: Bob Merriman

Complete Description:
There will be a Public Hearing for the Metropolitan Development Commission in the Public Assembly Room.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------


2nd Floor of the City-County Building
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200 E. Washington St.
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Old May 14th, 2007, 06:29 PM   #400
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ablerock View Post
I talked to the developer and he's pretty confident of a July groundbreaking. Perhaps one of our government employee friends here can research whether it has been officially approved yet. I haven't seen any official announcements.

It's geared toward students, so the apartments aren't going to be huge... probably in the 500-600 sq ft range. The big question is where parking is going to be. I don't know whether he owns any lots nearby yet.

Speaking of parking lots, the developer also mentioned the Scottish Rite Cathedral was interested in selling him one of their's for development. I'm not sure which one he was talking about, but I'm guessing it's the one facing Meridian. (That will be hot property soon because the Cultural Trail touches it.) That's all he said.

Paramount Towers Site (The Big Pink H )
From what I heard, this development will not have any on-site parking (perhaps a few for staff, etc.). They were looking to lease the Scottish Rite parking lot on Meridian St. From my perspective, this is not good development for downtown. The development should include parking. This makes it almost impossible to retrofit the building later for market-rate housing. The last thing we need downtown is continued parking along Meridian St. The Scottish Rite should sell that parking lot for development - they are probably afraid that any new development might detract from the Cathedral. So the development would have to better than what we have been seeing.

Just back from Cyprus to Heidleberg Germany. Even in the capital of Nicosia, almost every new development has parking included in the building. Cyürus has only 700,000 people - Nicosia area around 300,000. It should be a downtown zoning requirement. Almost everywhere I have been, the parking has been made to fit in with the urban area, not destroy it.
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