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Old July 6th, 2007, 07:09 AM   #1601
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IndyBob View Post
BART may be automated, but it is heavy-rail. Steel wheels on steel rail.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bay_Area_Rapid_Transit

AGT (Automated Guide Technology) examples are the Clarian People Mover, Las Vegas Monorail, Seattle Monorail, Disney, airports, etc. Overwhelmingly very short, point-to-point connections.
I'm sorry, I misunderstood you. I thought you were simply talking about systems that are automated.
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Old July 6th, 2007, 07:16 AM   #1602
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Originally Posted by hoosier View Post
So will we be checking out the Waverley site on the 7th?

Lots of small scale residential development in the DT area. I want some 10+ story towers though!!
It's odd. I was looking at the list of residential development on indydt.com and it struck me that there has really been no single major residential development downtown, in terms of height or even a hefty number of units (such as over 300). There are a few developments, such as 3Mass or the Villagio, that are around 10 storeys, but they still contain roughly 60 units.

It means that the MSA development will most likely be the first massive purely residential downtown development.
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Old July 6th, 2007, 07:39 AM   #1603
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Has anyone discussed this project in the Holy Cross Neighborhood?

Highland Stacks:
http://www.highlandstacks.com/
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Old July 6th, 2007, 03:12 PM   #1604
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as for the canal resistance,
you live in downtown, any avaliable land will be developed, unless its a park, dont count on it being there forever.
These people are going to have to get over it, or they can pack their bags and move to the suburbs.
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Old July 6th, 2007, 03:14 PM   #1605
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thehoss257 View Post
Has anyone discussed this project in the Holy Cross Neighborhood?

Highland Stacks:
http://www.highlandstacks.com/
WTF? Tin walls? What is this, a pull barn inspired design? This thing is hidiouse!
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Old July 6th, 2007, 04:36 PM   #1606
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thehoss257 View Post
Has anyone discussed this project in the Holy Cross Neighborhood?

Highland Stacks:
http://www.highlandstacks.com/
I wasn't aware of it. Thanks for the link.

I like it. But I would, I'm a modernist. :-)

Highland Stacks:




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Old July 6th, 2007, 04:51 PM   #1607
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Editorial from July 6, 2007 Indianapolis Star:

Don't be left at the station when train rolls into future

Our position: Indiana needs to seize the regional high-speed rail opportunity.

At first blush it sounds extravagant, even prohibitive, the notion of laying 319 miles of high-speed rail through Indiana at a cost of $1 million per mile.

But that estimate by state government of the price tag for a Cincinnati-Indy-Chicago corridor must be put in perspective. Compared to a couple of other big 3's -- the $3.8 billion received for the Indiana Toll Road lease and the $3 billion to be paid out for the southern extension of I-69 -- the investment in mass transit as an alleviator of highway congestion looks like a bargain. Plus, as with highways, there is financial help to be had from Washington.

Indiana must get aboard if federal legislation to create a Midwest rapid rail system is to meet with the success it deserves. Unanimously approved by the Senate Commerce Committee in April, the bill may be voted on by the full Senate later this month. It is uncertain at this point how much the nine affected states will be asked to kick in, but President Bush has proposed $100 million in grants to them.

The truly steep incline facing this little-engine-that-could is not price so much as priorities. A 110-mile-an-hour train that could take business commuters, shoppers and tourists from the Ohio River to the Loop in four hours is a solid bet to attract a sizeable customer base, notwithstanding the cultural bias toward the automobile that so many elected officials cite for demurring from mass transit. Surveys by the Indiana High Speed Rail Association, which has been pushing for a Midwest network more than a decade, substantiate this prospect, as do the experiences of St. Louis, Portland and other metro areas similar in size and density to Indianapolis.

If some trains run far from filled, the same can be said of stretches of Indiana's interstate highways. If subsidies are an issue, they're a much larger issue with asphalt than rail. If overall economic benefit is considered, the savings in fuel, travel time and air quality should carry the day.

And finally, if the state is to leave mass transit out as a beneficiary of Major Moves, as it did, then isn't public apathy toward rail and bus a self-fulfilling prophecy?

What Indiana and its neighbors need to do is not just embrace the interurban connector but to tie it in to diversified transit systems -- car, bus and rail -- within the cities and suburbs. Infrastructure costs here will be even greater per mile, of course; but federal funds could shoulder much of the load. And, given fuel costs, pollution sanctions and growth trends, paving our way to adequate mobility is clearly a fonder fantasy than taking a fast train to see the White Sox.
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Old July 6th, 2007, 05:57 PM   #1608
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Glad to see the star take a position on mass transit. Let hope they continue to show such support in the future.
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Old July 6th, 2007, 06:04 PM   #1609
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Clark Khalo will oppose anything!
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Old July 6th, 2007, 06:57 PM   #1610
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I don't see how a high speed rail line gets built for anything near $1 million per mile.
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Old July 6th, 2007, 06:58 PM   #1611
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I'm about ready to start opposing things too. Just got my property tax bill yesterday with a 60% increase over last year. I'm all for progress downtown in in the outlying areas but not when big businesses are getting tax abatements and we are paying for it. Yes the value of my downtown condo has been reassessed higher, but I find it hard to believe that with the glut of new condos being built downtown that I'd be able to get top dollar for my place. A couple of years ago when they did all the re-evaluations my taxes went up. We were told older homes would most likely go up, newer homes would probably go down. My condo was built in 2000... so fairly new. My taxes went up. And now again 60% more on top. I wonder if these tax bills are gonna seal Petersons re-election fate. People of Indiana dont like taxes. SORRY! Just venting.
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Old July 6th, 2007, 08:45 PM   #1612
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The prop taxes on my parent's 1890 irvington home incresed by 100%. It's out of control.

I really like the Highland Stacks project, thanks for the post.

and.. I would love to see high-speed rail. I've taken the Amtrack to Chicago and I really like going to the city and not worrying about a car and parking, etc, and the train has outlets for computers etc... but 5 hours from indianapolis to chicago really IS a long trip.
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Last edited by billionbucks; July 6th, 2007 at 08:51 PM.
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Old July 6th, 2007, 11:19 PM   #1613
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OK...we need final deatils for tomorrow:

What is the place and time????
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Old July 6th, 2007, 11:31 PM   #1614
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I'll be downtown for the USS Indianapolis Survivors parade at 11:30. You guys have a great time. Take pics too. Love to see what you all look like.

3Mass update. Groundbreaking has been delayed due to issues with the city. All the t's are crossed and the i's dotted. Spoke with a person with Keystone Construction and they said they have to agreed to pay $70 per meter per day for the spaces on New York and Mass Ave that will be blocked off. That would equal $45 for parking income and $25 for the anticipated parking tickets for each space. He told me they are 1.8 million over budget from the delay. They hope to start digging the hole next week.
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Old July 6th, 2007, 11:40 PM   #1615
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Official Logistics:

Skyscrapercity.com Forum Indianapolis Meet-Up
Saturday, July 7, 2007 @ 10:00am EDT
East Side of the Soldiers and Sailors Monument

You won't be able to miss me because I'm planning to wear my brown and white spectators. (So I hope we don't tramp through too much dust).
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Old July 7th, 2007, 12:06 AM   #1616
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arenn View Post
By the way, for anyone who thinks Chicago's transit system is all that, check out this article:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...l=chi-news-hed

The CTA has long been one of the operationally most pathetic transit systems in the US.
Sure the CTA has its problems but I spend enough time up in Chicago (I'm here now and was here when this happened) to believe that the system is all that, plus a bag of chips. That some whiney asses got inconvenienced for a little over an hour while the system was trying to handle a rush of 1,000,000+ people trying to get out of downtown does nothing to change my opinion. The system did exactly what it was supposed to do when it sensed a potentially serious safety problem. Sure the CTA workers could have done a better job of communicating, but frankly, I'm disappointed in (some) Chicagoans for being such a bunch of whiners. (Perhaps they would have all been happier sitting in their cars in traffic for hours instead?)
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Old July 7th, 2007, 12:35 AM   #1617
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cityfan View Post
That is weird. It must be incorrect, because the whole project is supposed to be appartments.
No kidding.

From here :

Quote:
J.C. Hart Company's newest community creation, The Waverley at 151, is now underway at the NEQ of Georgia and South East Streets. Plans call for 164 urban apartments and 1-3 adjacent retail structures of 1,800-2,000 sq. ft. in size each, and all on less than five acres. The retail component of The Waverley at 151 will be known as The Waverley Commons.
(bolding mine)

Based on what I've seen of the constuction so far, there's no way that they're building $700k - $900k condos on that site.

Edited to Add: The Star has corrected the story and no longer talks about condos being part of the development.
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Old July 7th, 2007, 12:38 AM   #1618
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Chris

Deleted Double Post

Last edited by kangaroo1; July 7th, 2007 at 12:39 AM. Reason: Double-Post
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Old July 7th, 2007, 12:38 AM   #1619
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Chris

Quote:
Originally Posted by Indywatch View Post
I'm about ready to start opposing things too. Just got my property tax bill yesterday with a 60% increase over last year. I'm all for progress downtown in in the outlying areas but not when big businesses are getting tax abatements and we are paying for it. Yes the value of my downtown condo has been reassessed higher, but I find it hard to believe that with the glut of new condos being built downtown that I'd be able to get top dollar for my place. A couple of years ago when they did all the re-evaluations my taxes went up. We were told older homes would most likely go up, newer homes would probably go down. My condo was built in 2000... so fairly new. My taxes went up. And now again 60% more on top. I wonder if these tax bills are gonna seal Petersons re-election fate. People of Indiana dont like taxes. SORRY! Just venting.
On average about 50% of your tax bill goes to the school district, which in your case is IPS and is controlled by an independent elected school board. IPS has a much higher tax rate than many other districts. While tax abatements can erode the school tax base and the general tax base, they certainly don't account for the majority of the whopping property tax increase.

In part, IPS does (and all of Center Township) does have to struggle with a tax base hurt by a large number of properties being tax-exempt--e.g. IUPUI, all the state owned government buildings, federal buildings, etc. However, the real problem is that IPS simply has a disporportionate number of high-cost students--that is students who are either learning disabled or require bilingual education (federal and state rules require school districts to incur the expense to accomodate learning disabled and bilingual students). IPS also has a huge number of old buildings which need a lot of maintenance--and many simply need to be replaced.

In other school districts (such as Hamilton Southeastern, etc), property taxes are increasing because of soaring enrollment and lavish building projects. While Marion County was hit very hard with property tax increases--people outside Indianapolis aren't aware (or overlook) that individuals in counties across the state are seeing WHOPPING property tax increases and are just as angry.

Aside from the school district taxes, Marion County (and other counties) are saddled with very large expenses for state-mandated child welfare programs.

This is not the entire picture about property taxes, but it explains a nice chunk of why property taxes are soaring.

The state needs to assume the cost of both public education and child welfare programs. The state should moderately increase state income taxes to raise the funds to assume these expenses. This would result in everyone across the state seeing their property tax bills go down by about 50% or more. Graduated income taxes are a more fair method of taxation because they tax people on their ability to pay and tax people on actual wealth, not imputed wealth. Many people, especially the elderly, purchased their homes years ago, and could not afford to buy their houses now and they simply do not have the funds to pay high propery taxes. If taxes go up too high, then the only option for many people is to sell their house. Also, the supposed "market valuation" for property tax assessment often doesn't actually reflect true fair market price. Moreover, it is based on the assumption that you can quickly convert a house to cash; and furthermore, it does not take into consideration the depressing effect on the housing market of many people selling to escape higher property taxes.

I truly believe this is a situation the General Assembly needs to fix--in a special session this year. I am pretty sure the Governor will call one. The Legislature really blew it big time by not taking concrete steps to alleviate the income tax burden.

Last edited by kangaroo1; July 7th, 2007 at 12:41 AM. Reason: Fixed typo
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Old July 7th, 2007, 03:31 AM   #1620
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kangaroo1 View Post
On average about 50% of your tax bill goes to the school district, which in your case is IPS and is controlled by an independent elected school board. IPS has a much higher tax rate than many other districts. While tax abatements can erode the school tax base and the general tax base, they certainly don't account for the majority of the whopping property tax increase.

In part, IPS does (and all of Center Township) does have to struggle with a tax base hurt by a large number of properties being tax-exempt--e.g. IUPUI, all the state owned government buildings, federal buildings, etc. However, the real problem is that IPS simply has a disporportionate number of high-cost students--that is students who are either learning disabled or require bilingual education (federal and state rules require school districts to incur the expense to accomodate learning disabled and bilingual students). IPS also has a huge number of old buildings which need a lot of maintenance--and many simply need to be replaced.

In other school districts (such as Hamilton Southeastern, etc), property taxes are increasing because of soaring enrollment and lavish building projects. While Marion County was hit very hard with property tax increases--people outside Indianapolis aren't aware (or overlook) that individuals in counties across the state are seeing WHOPPING property tax increases and are just as angry.

Aside from the school district taxes, Marion County (and other counties) are saddled with very large expenses for state-mandated child welfare programs.

This is not the entire picture about property taxes, but it explains a nice chunk of why property taxes are soaring.

The state needs to assume the cost of both public education and child welfare programs. The state should moderately increase state income taxes to raise the funds to assume these expenses. This would result in everyone across the state seeing their property tax bills go down by about 50% or more. Graduated income taxes are a more fair method of taxation because they tax people on their ability to pay and tax people on actual wealth, not imputed wealth. Many people, especially the elderly, purchased their homes years ago, and could not afford to buy their houses now and they simply do not have the funds to pay high propery taxes. If taxes go up too high, then the only option for many people is to sell their house. Also, the supposed "market valuation" for property tax assessment often doesn't actually reflect true fair market price. Moreover, it is based on the assumption that you can quickly convert a house to cash; and furthermore, it does not take into consideration the depressing effect on the housing market of many people selling to escape higher property taxes.

I truly believe this is a situation the General Assembly needs to fix--in a special session this year. I am pretty sure the Governor will call one. The Legislature really blew it big time by not taking concrete steps to alleviate the income tax burden.
Damn, the State legislature should just have you go down to the statehouse and fix the problem . That was a great and insightful post. I agree with you 100%.
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