daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Railways

Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old May 1st, 2007, 08:48 PM   #1
phubben
Is it a bee?
 
phubben's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hopefully Berlin (ASAP)
Posts: 390
Likes (Received): 1

MISC | Commuter vs Regional Rail

I'm not trying to know if you you think commuter is better than regional rail but what the diffence is between these 2 types of train sets.
phubben no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old May 1st, 2007, 09:12 PM   #2
Frog
SSC addict
 
Frog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 422
Likes (Received): 3

I think it probably depends on country, here in UK commuter is usually more than 2 coaches long, usually electric (overhead or third rail)

This is a commuter train that I normally see. But as with most things there are some exceptions, I have seen 2 coach commuter trains and there are diesel commuter trains on some unelectrified lines.
Regional trains here are usually 2 coaches and mostly diesel

There are probably some exceptions but i'd be surprised if there were electric regional trains as electrification is fairly poor in this country. Anyway for me that is generally the difference between commuter and regional trains, i'd be interested to see what its like in other countries
Frog no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 1st, 2007, 09:20 PM   #3
Minato ku
Moderator
 
Minato ku's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Paris, Montrouge
Posts: 16,746

In France

The Commuter rails is the suburban trains
It link the residencial districts at the CBD. It run only inside one the metropolitan area.

A commuter train in Paris


Regional rail link cities or towns of the same region, it can link sereval metropolitan area but in the same region
Exemple a regional train link Lyon at Grenoble, It is two differant metroplitan area but in the same region : Rhone Alpes.

A regional train in France


A Commuter train is a regional train
but not all the regional train are commuter rail.

I prefer the commuter train in Japan

JR Chuo Sobu line

Tokyu Den-en-toshi


In Germany It is
S Bahn for commuter train and R Bahn for Regional train.
__________________
すみません !
J’aime Paris et je veux des tours !
Minato ku no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 1st, 2007, 09:38 PM   #4
newyorkrunaway1
Skyscraper Guru
 
newyorkrunaway1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 835
Likes (Received): 8

this is a very simply put explanation, there is more to it than this, but gives you the general idea.

commuter rail and regional rail are very similar. commuter rail however has more stops closer together, and travels less distance.

regional rail has fewer stops, and travels much greater distances.
newyorkrunaway1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 1st, 2007, 10:18 PM   #5
Trainman Dave
systems rule!
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 499
Likes (Received): 17

Quote:
Originally Posted by newyorkrunaway1 View Post
this is a very simply put explanation, there is more to it than this, but gives you the general idea.

commuter rail and regional rail are very similar. commuter rail however has more stops closer together, and travels less distance.

regional rail has fewer stops, and travels much greater distances.
These considerations lead to significant design differences:

Commuter Rail is designed for short journeys with wide doors to reduce the time need to load and unload at each station. In turn this often reduces the number of rows of seats.

Regional Rail tends to cover longer journeys and will maximise the number seats and reduce the size of the doors.

Of course there is a wide range of variations between these extremes but it will very interesting to observe the design decisions made for the new Thameslink trains in London which will have to serve both markets!
Trainman Dave no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 1st, 2007, 11:58 PM   #6
phubben
Is it a bee?
 
phubben's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hopefully Berlin (ASAP)
Posts: 390
Likes (Received): 1

Thanks! I think a combination of all your infos might make a good definition!

Although I'm not sure a commuter rail "has" to run within a metropolitan area's limits, of course it applies to Paris since its whole region is consdered a metropolitan area.
I was more interested by the differences between the train sets and I'm satisfied with what you explained...
but still I'm quite sure that the latest Intercity/Regional train sets I've seen around Lille (like the oe minato ku put in his post) do have wide doors!
phubben no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 2nd, 2007, 01:01 PM   #7
forrestcat
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Adelaide--Multiculturalization Capital
Posts: 1,837
Likes (Received): 7

Quote:
Originally Posted by minato ku View Post

I prefer the commuter train in Japan

JR Chuo Sobu line

Tokyu Den-en-toshi

I see narrow gauge commuter trains .Nice!!!
__________________
VISIT MALAYSIA 2007
MULTICULTURALIZATION CAPITAL-KUALA LUMPUR
http://www.tourism.gov.my/
forrestcat no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 2nd, 2007, 03:04 PM   #8
phubben
Is it a bee?
 
phubben's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hopefully Berlin (ASAP)
Posts: 390
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by forrestcat
I see narrow gauge commuter trains .Nice!!!
That's right, I didn't notice! I thought only a few tram networks had narrow jauge!
phubben no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 2nd, 2007, 03:39 PM   #9
Augusto
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: PAR THR KL SIN
Posts: 393
Likes (Received): 47

Quote:
Originally Posted by phubben View Post
That's right, I didn't notice! I thought only a few tram networks had narrow jauge!
The Kuala Lumpur KTM Kommuter network is narrow gauge too. So is the Metro in Gauteng (Johannesburg/Pretoria). There are some narrow gauge networks in Europe (Barcelona, Bern,..)
Augusto no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 2nd, 2007, 04:43 PM   #10
forrestcat
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Adelaide--Multiculturalization Capital
Posts: 1,837
Likes (Received): 7

KTM Komuter on narrow gauge tracks.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nazrey View Post

81 Class, Jenbacher, Austria
by TS. Bok


Quote:
Originally Posted by nazrey View Post

83 Class - Hyundai, South Korea
by haxa

KTM Komuter connects KL with its outer suburbs or satellite cities. There are three cities and a large town connected by KTM Komuter, Kuala Lumpur, Petaling Jaya,Shah Alam and Seremban(large town) ,the,farthest station,about 50km from Kuala Lumpur).

So from what I gather in this thread, does the KTM Komuter qualify both as a regional and commuter service. .
__________________
VISIT MALAYSIA 2007
MULTICULTURALIZATION CAPITAL-KUALA LUMPUR
http://www.tourism.gov.my/

Last edited by forrestcat; May 2nd, 2007 at 05:06 PM.
forrestcat no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 2nd, 2007, 05:40 PM   #11
Minato ku
Moderator
 
Minato ku's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Paris, Montrouge
Posts: 16,746

Quote:
Originally Posted by phubben View Post
That's right, I didn't notice! I thought only a few tram networks had narrow jauge!
All the trains in Japan have a narrow gauge exept the Shinkansen (High speed trains), Tokyo Metro Ginza line and Tokyo metro Marunouchi line.
__________________
すみません !
J’aime Paris et je veux des tours !
Minato ku no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 2nd, 2007, 07:33 PM   #12
Unsing
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Tokyo
Posts: 279
Likes (Received): 10

In Japan, the most obvious difference is the arrangement of the seats.
Commuter rail is designed to have more capacity and be easier for passengers to get on and off.

Commuter rail


Regional rail
Unsing no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 2nd, 2007, 08:46 PM   #13
phubben
Is it a bee?
 
phubben's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Hopefully Berlin (ASAP)
Posts: 390
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by Unsing View Post
In Japan, the most obvious difference is the arrangement of the seats.
Commuter rail is designed to have more capacity and be easier for passengers to get on and off.

Commuter rail


Regional rail
By the look of it Paris' RER is a regional rail network even though it goes less far (is 'less far' correct) than the suburban rail networks!...

I'm getting confused...
phubben no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2007, 02:59 AM   #14
forrestcat
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Adelaide--Multiculturalization Capital
Posts: 1,837
Likes (Received): 7

KTM Komuter also have 2 seating configuration.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nazrey View Post


EMU03 - Interior (New)
Photos by kelvinkhew of Ktmrailwayfan.com

This seating arrangement is typical of the class 81. Typically used for long haul journeys such as to Seremban. There no seats facing the side of the train or facing backward to prevent motion sickness among the passengers during the lengthy journey.


Quote:
Originally Posted by nazrey View Post
KTM Komuter Class 83 EMU

interior


The other seating configuration resembles the ones in LRTs with fewer seats but could carry more people between shorter distances.

I believe that's the difference between regional and commuter trains as Unsing said.I get it.This makes sense.
__________________
VISIT MALAYSIA 2007
MULTICULTURALIZATION CAPITAL-KUALA LUMPUR
http://www.tourism.gov.my/
forrestcat no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2007, 10:47 AM   #15
invincible
Lurker
 
invincible's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 3,804
Likes (Received): 523

Commuter rail is any service that can reach the city in a reasonable time (~1 hour) for people to commute to daily.

Over here, that would be all suburban lines and about half of the state's regional rail network.
invincible no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 11th, 2007, 09:17 AM   #16
spindoctor
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: bangkok
Posts: 12
Likes (Received): 0

This is SPRINTER of THAILAND. class 158.
spindoctor no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 14th, 2007, 10:42 PM   #17
Rohne
Schwarzkutte
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Franconofurd
Posts: 830
Likes (Received): 361

In Germany

Our Commuter Rail is called S-Bahn.

S-Bahn-Systems can be found in:
Berlin, Dresden, Hamburg, Hannover, Leipzig, Magdeburg, Munich, Nuremberg, Frankfurt, Mannheim, Cologne, Ruhr-Area, Rostock and Stuttgart.
All trains are electric (except one line in Rostock). While the systems in Dresden, Leipzig, Magdeburg, Nuremberg, Cologne/Ruhr-Area and Rostock mostly use push-pull trains (Dresden, Leipzig, Magdeburg and Rostock double-decker), the other systems are only operated by mulitple units. But the future looks like that all systems will use MUs earlier or later.
When the trains can use their own tracks platform heights are 960 mm, else 760 mm. Newer trains normally look like this one:

S-Bahn Berlin:


Regional trains can be found all over Germany.
There is the Regionalbahn (R-Bahn/RB), which stops at every station. When reaching an area served by the S-Bahn, RB trains only stop at the most important stations.
StadtExpress (SE) is nearly the same, but they are mainly used to connect cities while RB trains are only used to link the countryside.
Fastest regional trains are Regionalexpress (RE) which often run on the same lines like RB trains, but only stop at most important stations and can reach speeds up to 200kph.
Regional trains are mostly locomotive-hauled trains (RE mostly double-decker), but there are also many multiple units in use.

Rohne no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 15th, 2007, 08:42 PM   #18
Yardmaster
Registered Melbourne
 
Yardmaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Melbourne
Posts: 4,152
Likes (Received): 198

The word "commuting" is of American origin, although derived from Latin roots. A Google/Wikipedia search turned up an appropriate definition, especially for "commuter rail" ... it means rail transport for which you can get from home to work or wherever and back in a day.

We called it the suburban system ... you can comfortably get home and back on much of the regional system here too (with time to earn a living and pay for your fares in between).

So is it time or distance? Or just rolling-stock which makes the difference? Or is it just a matter of definition?
Yardmaster no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 15th, 2007, 10:44 PM   #19
Trainman Dave
systems rule!
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 499
Likes (Received): 17

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yardmaster View Post
The word "commuting" is of American origin, although derived from Latin roots. A Google/Wikipedia search turned up an appropriate definition, especially for "commuter rail" ... it means rail transport for which you can get from home to work or wherever and back in a day.

We called it the suburban system ... you can comfortably get home and back on much of the regional system here too (with time to earn a living and pay for your fares in between).

So is it time or distance? Or just rolling-stock which makes the difference? Or is it just a matter of definition?
The problem here is that each country has its own defintions which reflect their specific regulations.

In the US, Commuter rail is distiguished from both "light rail systems" and "heavy rail metros" because Commuter rail shares the railway tracks with freight trains. This brings into play a completely new set of regulations for the design and operation of the trains and they use much heavier and stronger carriages on Commuter Rail systems.

"light rail systems" and "heavy rail metros" are completely segregated from the freight trains and conform to different regulations.
__________________
The "rest of the story" is buried in the details

Last edited by Trainman Dave; June 16th, 2007 at 01:14 AM.
Trainman Dave no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 15th, 2007, 10:50 PM   #20
Trainman Dave
systems rule!
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 499
Likes (Received): 17

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trainman Dave View Post
The problem here is that each country has its own defintions which reflect their specific regulations.

In the US, Commuter rail is distiguished from both "light rail systems" and "heavy rail metros" because Commuter rail shares the railway tracks with freight trains. This brings into play a completely new set of regulations for the design and operation of the trains and they use much heavier and stronger carriages on Commuter Rail systems.

"light rail systems" and "heavy rail metros" are completely segrated from the freight trains and conform to different regulations.
There is another important difference in the US. Commuter Rail is distinguished from Intercity rail service in that it authorized and supported by the States and it does not have to be operated by Amtrak. On the other hand all inter city trains by Federal Law must be operated by Amtrak.
__________________
The "rest of the story" is buried in the details
Trainman Dave no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:25 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium