daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments

General Urban Developments Discussions of projects shorter than 100m/300ft. Also, please post all other threads not specified in other Development News subforums here.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old December 3rd, 2016, 06:25 PM   #401
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

Give heritage building revitalisation projects the time and support they need
The struggle between commercial viability and preserving history is a difficult one for the government and its partners, but one that can be won with the right environment
December 1, 2016
South China Morning Post Excerpt

Officially, Hong Kong has only a little over 1,440 heritage buildings and historic monuments left. This is a sad reality for an international city with an East-meets-West history of more than a century. It is important that concerted efforts be made not just to preserve them, but also put them to good public use whenever possible.

Credit goes to the government for offering some old premises a new lease of life under the Revitalising Historic Buildings Through Partnership scheme. So far, eight of the 15 projects approved are already operating, costing taxpayers HK$1.7 billion.

Inevitably, there are challenges to overcome. The remote location of some sites makes public access and enjoyment difficult. The rules attached to the use of public funds means operations are also constrained. Not all projects can, therefore, ultimately become self-financing. As confirmed by the development chief, more than one operatoris seeking help from the government. In the case of the Fong Yuen Study Hall in Ma Wan, the village school-turned-Chinese culture centre is reportedly considering giving up the site due to low attendance.

The situation speaks volumes for the difficulties in heritage conservation. The government and project operators often find themselves struggling between commercial viability and preserving history. This is understandable in a city where money always comes first. The use of taxpayers’ money makes sustainability and accountability vitally important. That explains why revitalised projects are required to be up and running on their own after two years of government subsidies.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

kunming tiger liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old December 10th, 2016, 05:21 AM   #402
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

Long, tedious process ahead to save historical State Theatre, Hong Kong heritage chief says
Building, which opened in 1952 as Empire Theatre, was recently rated Grade 1 historic structure by Antiquities Advisory Board
December 9, 2016
South China Morning Post Excerpt







The process of negotiation to preserve the State Theatre will be long and tedious despite its new status as a Grade 1 historic building, according to the city’s heritage chief.

Antiquities Advisory Board chairman Andrew Lam Siu-lo was commenting on the 64-year-old structure located in the heart of North Point after members of the board voted by a large margin to make it the 163rd Grade 1 building on Thursday.

“The next phase will be negotiations between the government and owners plus stakeholders associated with the site. Whether it will be cash or swap of property elsewhere, public resources are involved. It is a decision that is beyond our board,” Lam said during a radio programme.

Grade 1 structures are those deemed by the board to be of “outstanding merit, which every effort should be made to preserve if possible”.

Called the Empire Theatre when it opened in 1952 and renamed the State Theatre in 1959, the building was a cultural hub managed by the late impresario Harry Odell, who brought in a league of top classical stars including violinist Isaac Stern, cellist Pierre Fournier and composer Benjamin Britten.

The 1,400-seat hall, which is now a snooker parlour, is one of the city’s last post-war stand-alone theatre structures.

Lam said the challenging aspect of negotiations to preserve the theatre was that the site had numerous small owners – as many as hundreds.

More : http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/e...storical-state
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

2mchris liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 10th, 2017, 06:10 PM   #403
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

Hong Kong’s faded Empire Theatre back in the spotlight with vote to give it historic status
Heritage experts say the 64-year-old building in North Point should be protected, but does it still have a role to play in a city hungry for land?
January 10, 2017
South China Morning Post Excerpt

A dark corridor meanders through a lane of tailor and shoe shops. Occasionally a dog barks or a cat meows. Who would imagine this was once the carpeted stairway leading to a glamorous theatre where world-class artists performed for high society?

“It was the best in Hong Kong at the time. Stylish inner design, comfortable seats, just sheer top-class enjoyment to be in there,” recalled cultural impresario Darwin Chen Tat-man of the Empire Theatre when it opened in 1952.

Renamed the State Theatre in 1959, the 1,400-seat venue, with its large dress circle and underground car park in the heart of North Point, was virtually the city’s cultural hub in its early years, bringing in a league of top international musicians that put post-war Hong Kong on the world map of classical music.

With the opening of the City Hall in 1962, its role was eclipsed and focused primarily on the cinema business for which it was built. With Hong Kong’s economic take-off in the 1970s, the rising affluent middle-class gradually turned to other forms of entertainment that marked the demise of many post-war cinemas and theatres, including the famous Lee Theatre in Causeway Bay, which gave way to redevelopment.

After a fire in 1995, the State Theatre closed on February 28, 1997, and in 1999 it suffered the indignity of being turned into a snooker parlour.

The original furnishings such as seats and lighting have long gone, but the building’s structure, including the auditorium, has remained intact. Small vendors and businesses now occupy the shopping arcade. It was a sleeping hub until the Antiquities Advisory Board voted last month by a large margin to propose it as a grade one historic building.

More : http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/e...back-spotlight
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 16th, 2017, 04:55 PM   #404
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

The Standard Excerpt
Police station's renewal as Green Hub lauded
Jan. 16, 2017











陳茂波網誌

Hong Kong is on a par with international standards when it comes to revitalization, Secretary for Development Paul Chan Mo-po said, following Unesco earlier awarding the old Tai Po Police Station an honorable mention in the 2016 Asia-Pacific Awards for Cultural Heritage Conservation.

"In Hong Kong, every foot of land is worth an inch of gold," Chan wrote in his blog. "It hasn't been an easy task balancing between development and preservation of historical buildings, especially given the heated debates over heritage conservation in society."

Built in 1899 as the first permanent police station in the New Territories, the former Tai Po Police Station was where the flag-raising ceremony took place marking the official British takeover of the New Territories. It was used as the police headquarters of the New Territories until 1949 and by different sections of the police force until it was closed in 1987.

The single-story colonial-style complex situated on a small hill at Wan Tau Kok was transformed in 2010 into the "Green Hub for Sustainable Development" by Kadoorie Farm and Botanic Garden under the government's second batch of Revitalizing Historic Buildings Through Partnership Scheme as a grade I historical structure and started operations in August 2015.

The Green Hub, which includes a guesthouse, a canteen which serves locally sourced vegetarian dishes and provides heritage tours and low-carbon living programs, was described as an "oasis" by the Unesco jury. The site received more than 50,000 visitors in the first year.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

2mchris liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old January 30th, 2017, 04:48 AM   #405
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

Quote:
Originally Posted by hkskyline View Post
Hong Kong’s faded Empire Theatre back in the spotlight with vote to give it historic status
Heritage experts say the 64-year-old building in North Point should be protected, but does it still have a role to play in a city hungry for land?
January 10, 2017
South China Morning Post Excerpt

A dark corridor meanders through a lane of tailor and shoe shops. Occasionally a dog barks or a cat meows. Who would imagine this was once the carpeted stairway leading to a glamorous theatre where world-class artists performed for high society?

“It was the best in Hong Kong at the time. Stylish inner design, comfortable seats, just sheer top-class enjoyment to be in there,” recalled cultural impresario Darwin Chen Tat-man of the Empire Theatre when it opened in 1952.

Renamed the State Theatre in 1959, the 1,400-seat venue, with its large dress circle and underground car park in the heart of North Point, was virtually the city’s cultural hub in its early years, bringing in a league of top international musicians that put post-war Hong Kong on the world map of classical music.

'Hanging trusses' of State Theatre, Hong Kong by thecobwebbedcrucible, on Flickr


'Hanging trusses' of State Theatre, Hong Kong by thecobwebbedcrucible, on Flickr


Mesmerising - State Theatre, Hong Kong by thecobwebbedcrucible, on Flickr
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

2mchris liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 14th, 2017, 01:54 PM   #406
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

South China Morning Post Excerpt
Hong Kong’s historic old Bank of China building set for new life as private bank headquarters
February 14, 2017


another night ... by hugo poon, on Flickr

Bank of China (Hong Kong) will convert its current historical old Bank of China building in Central into regional headquarters for its private banking unit as it expand services to capture the business of the growing number of mainland millionaires.

The private banking centre’s renovation, to be carried out in June, was designed by architect Sandi Pei Li Chung, the youngest son of I.M Pei, the architect behind the new Bank of China Tower in Garden Road, which began construction in 1985.

“The Pei family has a long history with Bank of China. My grandfather Pei Tsu-yee was the general manager of Bank of China Hong Kong branch and he worked on the top floor of the building, which is now the China Club,” Sandi Pei said on Monday. “My father used to collect his pocket money [from his father] in the lobby at the branch of the old Bank of China building.

“Now I am responsible for the renovation of the heritage building which has extended the long history of the bank with my family,” he said.

The old Bank of China building was constructed in 1951, serving as the major office of the bank until it moved to the new tower that was completed in 1990. The old building was still used as a bank branch, little-known to the public. More high profile was the bank’s tenant located on the 13th and 15 floors – China Club – which drew frequent visitors for lunches or dinners.

Pei said the old building’s lack of appeal to the public was because it was a stone building with small windows and a dark lobby.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

8166UY liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 20th, 2017, 06:58 PM   #407
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

Light and night-Hong Kong by Andyleung A1, on Flickr
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old February 23rd, 2017, 05:26 PM   #408
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

The architect family behind Hong Kong’s Bank of China Tower
February 21, 2017
South China Morning Post Excerpt

The iconic Bank of China Tower on Garden Road in Central is one of Hong Kong’s landmark buildings – a “masterpiece” designed by well known architect I.M. Pei.

Pei’s son Sandi Pei Li-Chung, 67, who followed in his father’s footsteps to become an architect in New York, spent eight years helping his father design for the 70-storey tower which, when completed in 1990, was the tallest building in Hong Kong.

The Pei family has a strong relationship with Bank of China. Sandi Pei’s grandfather, Pei Tsu-yee, was the first general manager to head the Hong Kong office of Bank of China before world war two.

Sandi Pei is the third of four children by I.M Pei, who will turn 100 year this year – the same age as Bank of China in Hong Kong. Sandi and his second eldest brother Didi Pei Chien-chung, both followed their father to become architects, with the two brothers having set up Pei Partnership Architects 25 years ago.

Sandi Pei has visited Hong Kong many times during the past year to work on the design for the refurbishment of the old Bank of China building in Queen’s Road, which will turn part of the historical building into a private banking regional headquarters, set to open in June this year.

In an interview with the South China Morning Post, Sandi Pei talked about his father, his vision of what makes a good architect, and the feng shui behind the design of the Bank of China Tower.

http://www.scmp.com/property/hong-ko...nk-china-tower
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 11th, 2017, 12:42 PM   #409
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

Windows ripped out of Hong Kong’s historic Red House despite ongoing preservation talks
Lawmaker calls it a ‘slap in the face’ of development officials and heritage advisers who have been monitoring the building
March 9, 2017
South China Morning Post Excerpt



Any moves to demolish a historic building, believed to be linked to Dr Sun Yat-sen, the founding father of modern China, have been hit by a government order.

The Development Bureau said it would declare the grade one Red House in Tuen Mun a “proposed monument” after parts of its *window frames were torn down on Wednesday.

According to the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance, the bureau may make such a declaration if a building is under the threat of demolition or renovation works that may affect its heritage value. No work may be carried out at the premises for a year.

“The government is highly concerned about the recent works carried out in and around the Red House. With the support of the Antiquities Advisory Board, the government will gazette its decision to declare the Red House a proposed monument as soon as possible, so that it can obtain *immediate legal protection,” a bureau spokesman said.

The declaration was unanimously supported by board members yesterday. “The actions of the owner have clearly crossed the line,” board chairman Andrew Lam Siu-lo said.

The work was carried out *despite ongoing discussions *between the government and the representatives of the owner over preservation proposals for the two-storey structure.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

Last edited by hkskyline; March 11th, 2017 at 12:50 PM.
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old March 24th, 2017, 06:29 PM   #410
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

Proactive approach needed to fix ‘Red House’ issue
March 21, 2017
South China Morning Post Excerpt

There has been much in the media recently regarding the Red House, a Grade 1 villa located on farmland in Pak Kok near Tuen Mun. Ownership changed hands in November last year at HK$5 million and concerns regarding demolition were first expressed last month when some tenancies were terminated and damage inflicted to parts of the surrounding walls (not included in the grading). Since then further damage has been done to the house itself resulting in the government taking action to declare it a “proposed monument”.

Many believe the house served as a base for republican revolutionaries who overthrew the Qing dynasty in 1911 including Sun Yat-sen, the founding father of modern China. Others have doubts about the linkage with Sun himself as there appears to be no real certainty as to the date of construction of the house itself; however this does not change the fact that Red House is a Grade 1 heritage building and only adds to the challenges faced in conserving the city’s built heritage. I will come back to Red House later but believe there is first a need to explain the context within which decisions regarding built heritage conservation in Hong Kong are considered.

The Antiquities & Monuments Ordinance has been in effect since 1976, a time when economic growth and expansion were the drivers of the day and most, although not all, of the community supported such policies with the result that issues like heritage conservation, adequate open space, the environment and similar issues were not considered to be as important as building more infrastructure, more housing, more offices and bigger shopping centres.

In fact the ordinance almost seems to have been written with a view to limiting what might be regarded as worthy of conservation with only a narrow definition of built heritage – historic or architectural significance. In addition, the Antiquities Advisory Board (AAB) is just that – it has no executive powers and is reliant on others within government to implement its recommendations. Various heritage policy consultations and engagements have taken place over the years but unfortunately review and upgrade of the ordinance have always been regarded as an unnecessary outcome.

There are also issues with the current grading system in that even a Grade 1 building is not fully protected against demolition or inappropriate alteration which reduces or destroys its heritage value. Only declared monuments cannot be demolished under the law (there were 114 of these as at May 2016) and Grade 1 (which at December 2016 comprised some 172 buildings) is currently only regarded as a “pool” of possible future monuments.

Under the current policy introduced in 2007 “due regard should be given to development needs in the public interest, respect for private property rights, budgetary considerations” among other factors with the Secretary for Development acting as the Antiquities Authority (solely but with the assistance of the Commissioner for Heritage); however the Antiquities & Monuments Office (AMO) remains under the Home Affairs Bureau.

More : http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/e...ll-become-very
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 2nd, 2017, 05:58 AM   #411
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

Cheer for former Central Market as nominal fee agreed for troubled revitalisation project
Architect says decision should overcome final hurdle of land premium
March 29, 2017
South China Morning Post Excerpt


more birds... (ii) by hugo poon, on Flickr

A nominal fee has been agreed on the site of the former Central Market in what is believed to be the final hurdle before the Urban *Renewal Authority begins the troubled revitalisation project.

The announcement on Wednesday came after lengthy negotiations between the URA, a statutory body, and the government over land premium, which could have made the project financially unviable after an original design was scrapped due to its high cost.

Urban Renewal Authority pledges to consider preserving remains of 100-year-old buildings site

The URA welcomed the decision and said work would start in the third quarter of the year with a target completion date of 2021, nearly 20 years after the building was vacated in 2003.

First proposed in 2009, the stalled project received the green light again after the Chief Executive in Council awarded the site in the heart of Central to the URA in a 21-year private treaty.

A nominal land premium will now be charged, contrary to *earlier reports that the sum would be decided at the market rate.

A recent survey by real estate firm CBRE put Central district as the most expensive office market in the world, at an average of HK$171 per sq ft a month.

A high development cost would have gone against the aim to provide affordable dining and entertainment options instead of a luxury shopping mall – a pledge made by chief executive-elect Carrie Lam Cheng Yuet-ngor *during her tenure as development minister in 2009.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 22nd, 2017, 03:28 PM   #412
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

Hong Kong Economic Journal Excerpt
May 22, 2017
URA to preserve the old Wing Woo Grocery building in Central



The Urban Renewal Authority (URA) is said to have decided to preserve the entire historical building on 120 Wellington Street in Central, bowing to the demands of conservation activists.

By opting to preserve the entire building, the agency is breaking with its normal practice of retaining only the street-facing facades of heritage properties that are sought to be redeveloped, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reports.

The paper cited sources from the URA as saying that the cost of preservation will be steep, and that the proposal would mean that at least 4,000 square feet of commercial space worth hundreds of millions of dollars is being sacrificed.

The building has a site area of 350 square meters and the plot ratio for non-residential land use is seven.

The ground floor of the building was home to the famous Wing Woo Grocery, which had operated for more than 80 years until its closure in 2009, while the second and third floors were for residential purposes.

The building, which came up in 1879 was purchased by the Urban Renewal Authority in 2008.

As the agency mulled redevelopment plans for old properties in the area, Wing Woo Grocery shut shop in early 2009, leaving the building vacant since.

Following the latest news, Wing Woo’s erstwhile owner, a person surnamed Kwan, said he is very pleased with the URA’s decision to preserve the building.

The building has been an important landmark in the neighborhood for decades and has been a symbol of the local community, he said.

Now living in a subsidized Home Ownership Scheme flat in Chai Wai, Kwan still revisits the historic building twice a week.

As one of the last traditional grocery shops in Central, Wing Woo had gained fame and the store even used to attract the odd foreign tourist.

A representative of a group that had lobbied to preserve the old building has lauded URA’s decision.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

el palmesano liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 26th, 2017, 03:00 AM   #413
Mexicola
Registered User
 
Mexicola's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Norrköping
Posts: 99
Likes (Received): 3

Thanks for all the great articles!
Mexicola no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old June 10th, 2017, 05:29 PM   #414
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

Prayers answered at historic temples and church
June 8, 2017
South China Morning Post Excerpt


(on.cc 資料圖片/古諮會文件)

Hong Kong’s Antiquities Advisory Board has agreed to declare three Grade One historic buildings as monuments for permanent protection.

The three buildings are 82-year-old Buddhist temple Tung Lin Kok Yuen in Happy Valley, 86-year-old Kowloon Union Church in Yau Ma Tei, and 318-year-old Yeung Hau Temple in Tai O.

At a meeting on Thursday, the board also agreed to recommend a three-storey building with over 130 years of history in Central as a Grade One historic building, meaning “every effort should be made to preserve [the building] if possible”.

“The Antiquities and Monuments Office considers that with the significant heritage value ... the three historic buildings have reached the ‘high threshold’ to be declared as monuments,” the office said in a statement. “Consent ... has been obtained from the respective owners.”

Office executive secretary Susanna Siu Lai-kuen said the three buildings were all privately owned, but the office would oversee the buildings’ conservation and maintenance after the declaration. The owners would need to obtain a permit from the office if they wanted to initiate any maintenance or renovation works, she said.

Built in 1935, Tung Lin Kok Yuen was founded by Lady Clara Hotung and her husband, prominent businessman Sir Robert Hotung. Its temple was designed by Fung Tsun, an architect trained in Hong Kong and London. It features Western engineering and Chinese designs such as flying eaves, brackets and glazed tile roofs.

Kowloon Union Church was built by the London Missionary Society and officially opened in 1931 by then governor Sir William Peel. During its occupation of the city, the Japanese army converted the church into a horse stable. It reopened for public worship in 1947.

The church is Gothic in style with a pitched Chinese-tiled roof, red brick walls and contrasting grey granite steps.

Yeung Hau Temple is thought to have been built in 1699 or earlier and is now the oldest temple in Tai O. Ceramic figurines depicting Chinese folk stories can be found on the roof’s ridge. There are also a pair of historic couplets from 1877 as well as a plaque from 1881 hanging inside the temple, which are unique artefacts in Hong Kong.

More : http://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/e...declares-three
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

2mchris liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old October 29th, 2017, 04:03 PM   #415
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

Oct. 26, 2017
Hong Kong Economic Journal Excerpt
Historic building Hung Lau expected to stay intact



An old building famous for its alleged links with Dr. Sun Yat-sen, the founding father of modern China, is expected to remain intact, easing concern Hong Kong may lose another monument of great historic value.

In documents submitted Wednesday to the Legislative Council, the Development Bureau said it has been in discussions with the new owner of Hung Lau, which means Red House, about keeping it as a preservation-cum-development project, the Hong Kong Economic Journal reports.

The bureau said that the owner is applying for government funding for the conservation of the property.

The maximum funding amount is HK$2 million if the application is approved. Ownership of the building cannot be transferred for 10 years and it has to be open to the public, according to the bureau.

Hung Lau is adjacent to Zhongshan Park in Tuen Mun. The building is known for its questionable links to Dr. Sun Yat-sen and his comrades who allegedly drew up plans to overthrow the Qing dynasty and establish the Republic of China in 1912.

However, the bureau said it cannot confirm any direct relationship between Sun and the alleged plot.

Also, it said it cannot confirm if the building was constructed in the early 20th century or if it is the original building.

Hung Lau has a Grade I historic building rating from the government.

Earlier reports said the building’s new owner planned to tear it down for redevelopment. In March, then Secretary for Development Eric Ma Siu-cheung declared the building as a proposed monument so that the government can have time to discuss with the owner about keeping it intact.
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

2mchris liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old November 27th, 2017, 02:54 PM   #416
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

Three historic buildings declared monuments
Government Press Release Excerpt
October 13, 2017







The Government today (October 13) announced that the Antiquities Authority (i.e. the Secretary for Development) has declared Tung Lin Kok Yuen in Happy Valley, Kowloon Union Church in Yau Ma Tei and the Yeung Hau Temple in Tai O as monuments under the Antiquities and Monuments Ordinance. The notice of the declaration was gazetted today.

Completed in 1935, Tung Lin Kok Yuen is a Buddhist temple founded by Lady Clara Ho Tung, a Buddhist, and her husband Sir Robert Ho Tung as a permanent institution to preach Buddhism and promote education. When the building was first opened, it housed Po Kok Free School and Po Kok Buddhist Institute, which were two educational institutions for women founded in Hong Kong by Lady Clara in the early 1930s. Since its establishment, Tung Lin Kok Yuen has played a significant religious and educational role in the Chinese community for its strong association with the early development of female education, and the development and teaching of modern Chinese Buddhism.

Tung Lin Kok Yuen was designed by Fung Tsun, an architect trained in Hong Kong and London, with the help of Shi Ai Ting who provided extensive advice for details which embody the Buddhist doctrine. Tung Lin Kok Yuen adopted Western structural forms, combined with traditional Chinese designs, details and decorations, such as flying eaves, brackets and glazed tile roofs. Internal decorative features, including aisle railings and wall and ceiling mouldings, are also in strong Chinese colours and design. With its arrowhead-shaped building plan, Tung Kin Kok Yuen's appearance resembles a giant ship, symbolising one of Mahayana Buddhism's concepts of ferrying all beings to the "other shore", or in other words enlightenment itself. The building follows the traditional Chinese layout for a Buddhist monastery design, with halls in designated sequence.

Kowloon Union Church was built by the London Missionary Society with financial support from Sir Paul Chater. The foundation stone was laid on May 27, 1930, by the then Colonial Secretary, W T Southorn, and the church was officially opened on April 10, 1931, by the then Governor Sir William Peel. During the Japanese occupation, the church ceased to function and the building was converted into a horse stable by the Japanese army and suffered severe looting and damage. The church was opened again for public worship with a rededication service held on October 19, 1947, and continues to serve the community to this day.

The church possesses Perpendicular Gothic architectural features, with a pitched Chinese-tiled roof, red load-bearing brick walls and contrasting grey granite steps and window surrounds. A semicircular apse and an attached three-storey battlemented tower were built at the two ends of the church respectively. The windows of the church are set in decorative granite framing in the form of trefoil-headed tracery. The elegant double hammer-beam timber roof trusses with carved granite corbel supports are a rare and dominant feature of the spacious interior of the main hall of the church.

The Yeung Hau Temple was probably built in 1699 or earlier with reference to the oldest relic at the temple, an iron bell cast in the 38th year of Kangxi's reign (1699) of the Qing dynasty dedicated to the deity of Hau Wong. The temple is one of the oldest temples in Tai O and has long been patronised not only by fishing folk and fisheries merchants in Tai O, but also by merchants from the neighbouring places and the Qing soldiers along the coast. The temple is also popular for its strong association with the Tai O dragon boat water parade, which is a traditional festive event with a history of over 100 years and was inscribed onto the third national list of intangible cultural heritage of China in 2011.

The temple compound consists of the main temple building and side halls constructed of grey brick, granite and timber. The main temple building is a Qing vernacular two-hall, three-bay building, with a courtyard covered with a pavilion in between the two halls. The recessed façade is supported by granite columns. Exquisite historic Shiwan ceramic figurines portraying Chinese folk stories can also be found on the roof ridge of the entrance hall and the two parapet walls of the covered courtyard.

More : http://www.info.gov.hk/gia/general/2...7101200791.htm
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!

el palmesano, 8166UY liked this post
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 12th, 2017, 09:22 PM   #417
hkskyline
Hong Kong
 
hkskyline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 86,491
Likes (Received): 17799

How urban renewal cost Hong Kong historic business districts and handed developers big profits
Wedding Card Street, Cloth Street, Bird Street, home to thriving decades-old businesses dear to Hongkongers’ hearts, were flattened to make way for Lee Tung Avenue, The Center and Langham Place. Traders reflect on their loss
December 11, 2017
South China Morning Post Excerpt

Hong Kong’s urban history may be relatively short, but the city has been developed and redeveloped so many times it already has the layers of a much older metropolis. Next time you walk through a glitzy shopping centre or the lobby of a high-end office tower, you may well be treading on the ruins of a completely different neighbourhood.

Take Lee Tung Avenue for example. The pseudo-colonial buildings that line this leafy shopping and entertainment promenade in Wan Chai are home to imported Japanese brands like Omotesando Koffee and trendy bars like the burlesque-inspired Ophelia.

Until 10 years ago, however, it was the site of what was known as Wedding Card Street because of the many wedding card printers with shops there. Lee Tung Street was razed in December 2007 by the Urban Renewal Authority (URA) despite widespread opposition.

That controversy is still fresh in the minds of many Hongkongers, but others have faded from public memory. In Central, office tower The Center was sold in October for HK$40.2 billion (US$5.1 billion) – believed to be the highest price ever fetched by a single office tower anywhere in the world.

It was a huge windfall for its owner, CK Asset Holdings, whose chairman is Li Ka-shing, Asia’s richest man. But not much was said about how The Center was conceived or the businesses flattened to make way for the officer tower, which was completed in 1998.

Travel back a few decades and you would have found a thriving, century-old fabric market on the land where The Center now stands.

“Going through Cloth Street was like going through a souk,” recalls art critic and urban planning activist John Batten. “There were no cars and the traders put their swatches of cloth outside, and they had a canopy over the street to protect it from the weather.”

More : http://www.scmp.com/lifestyle/travel...toric-business
__________________
Hong Kong Photo Gallery - Click Here for the Hong Kong Galleries

World Photo Gallery - | St. Petersburg, Russia | Pyongyang | Tokyo | Istanbul | Dubai | Shanghai | Mumbai | Bangkok | Sydney

New York, London, Prague, Iceland, Rocky Mountains, Angkor Wat, Sri Lanka, Poland, Myanmar, and much more!
hkskyline no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
hong kong

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 11:23 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu