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Old July 13th, 2010, 01:40 PM   #2781
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It's shaping up to be Lyulinnic!
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Old July 13th, 2010, 02:14 PM   #2782
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtybinka View Post
I`m not construction expert so I don`t know how many years concrete should survive
Concrete can last very long, as it deteriorates very slowly, allowing concrete roads to be neglected by the government very easily (look at the U.S. for example). Concrete usually lasts at least 20 years without major maintenance, but it is known some concrete roads are still in operation with the original pavement after 50 years.
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Old July 13th, 2010, 06:16 PM   #2783
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Concrete can last very long, as it deteriorates very slowly, allowing concrete roads to be neglected by the government very easily (look at the U.S. for example). Concrete usually lasts at least 20 years without major maintenance, but it is known some concrete roads are still in operation with the original pavement after 50 years.
i think that he asked for pylons, not for pavement
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Old July 14th, 2010, 01:14 AM   #2784
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x-type View Post
i think that he asked for pylons, not for pavement
yes I mean pylons
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Old July 14th, 2010, 01:25 AM   #2785
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It depends on when it was constructed. Longevity has increased considerably in recent decades. Most new concrete pylons (for bridges, overpasses, etc.) usually have a lifespan of at least 100 years. However, structures build in the 1960's and 1970's are often already nearing their lifespan, mostly because of concrete rot (rust in the reinforced concrete).
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Old July 14th, 2010, 09:16 PM   #2786
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Quote:
Bulgaria Signs Trakiya Highway Contract with Greek 'Aktor'

Business | July 14, 2010, Wednesday

The Bulgarian Road Infrastructure Agency is signing Wednesday with the Greek company Aktor the contract for the construction of Lot 3 of the Trakiya highway.

Greece's Aktor placed the lowest price offer of EUR 111.6 M in a tender for the construction of 35.7 kilometers of Bulgaria's Trakiya highway that would link the town of Nova Zagora and the city of Yambol, in southern Bulgaria. 10 other companies submitted bids for Lot 3.

The Greek company announced that they will not use subcontractors and will hire 1 000 new workers for the highway project, of whom up to 90% will be Bulgarian.

The groundbreaking of the road construction is expected for the beginning of August.

“Aktor” is the largest construction company in Greece with over 45% share of the market
So the Trakia Motorway story gets one more huge step close to a happy end. The contract for the last remaining Lot 4(Yambol-Karnobat) will be signed in couple weeks time hopefully.

Currently the works on Lot 2(Stara Zagora - Nova Zagora 32 km.) are on course. There 3 working sites open - at km.210 - 216, km. 232-237 and km. 237 - 242. 2 more should be opened very soon:



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Old July 15th, 2010, 11:17 AM   #2787
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You have really very atractive prices,
Our last tender in Poland - 536 milion EUR for 41 km A4 (Rzeszow-Jaroslaw)
on flat terrain and we have even company from China on the market and even from Skopje Makedonia
and Czech prices are much higher then Polish

PS
I`m in Svaty Vlas for 2 weeks and I`m really very happy then soon Trakiya will be ready ,
What about connection from Sofia to Serbian border ?

Last edited by jtybinka; July 15th, 2010 at 11:26 AM.
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Old July 15th, 2010, 11:24 AM   #2788
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There are several reasons for that.

First, labor cost in Bulgaria is cheaper. There is a significant income difference between Poland and Bulgaria, it wouldn't surprise me if wages are twice as high in Poland. Secondly, the area where the Polish A4 will run through is rather densely populated for a countryside. It will most likely require more expropriations. Third, this particular Bulgarian section does not cross any major waterways, so less bridges are needed, which would significantly lower the construction cost. Polish A4 crosses several smaller and larger rivers coming from the Beskidy mountains.
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Old July 16th, 2010, 11:36 AM   #2789
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
There are several reasons for that.

First, labor cost in Bulgaria is cheaper. There is a significant income difference between Poland and Bulgaria, it wouldn't surprise me if wages are twice as high in Poland. Secondly, the area where the Polish A4 will run through is rather densely populated for a countryside. It will most likely require more expropriations. Third, this particular Bulgarian section does not cross any major waterways, so less bridges are needed, which would significantly lower the construction cost. Polish A4 crosses several smaller and larger rivers coming from the Beskidy mountains.

Well, I`m not sure about labor cost becasue in Romania labor cost in theory should be cheaper as well compared to Poland, but prices per km in Romania are not so much lower.
I`m very surprised becasue in Bulgaria they build significantly cheaper even compared to Romania
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Old July 16th, 2010, 12:54 PM   #2790
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtybinka View Post
Well, I`m not sure about labor cost becasue in Romania labor cost in theory should be cheaper as well compared to Poland, but prices per km in Romania are not so much lower.
I`m very surprised becasue in Bulgaria they build significantly cheaper even compared to Romania
I hope that it's aswell how the quality is like.
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Old July 16th, 2010, 03:50 PM   #2791
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When the tenders are fair, the competition among the companies is big and this lowers the cost/km. And in the crisis, companies will do everything to win such big tenders as this is fresh money in bad times. Also the terrain of the motorway is easy. I also hope that the quality will be good.
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Old July 18th, 2010, 05:44 PM   #2792
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rossiankov View Post
When the tenders are fair, the competition among the companies is big and this lowers the cost/km. And in the crisis, companies will do everything to win such big tenders as this is fresh money in bad times. Also the terrain of the motorway is easy. I also hope that the quality will be good.
Yes, that's true, hopefully the quality will be good.
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Old July 18th, 2010, 11:03 PM   #2793
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
There are several reasons for that.

First, labor cost in Bulgaria is cheaper. There is a significant income difference between Poland and Bulgaria, it wouldn't surprise me if wages are twice as high in Poland. Secondly, the area where the Polish A4 will run through is rather densely populated for a countryside. It will most likely require more expropriations. Third, this particular Bulgarian section does not cross any major waterways, so less bridges are needed, which would significantly lower the construction cost. Polish A4 crosses several smaller and larger rivers coming from the Beskidy mountains.
I don't think labour costs count very much in the cost of a motorway. What matters more is the expropriation costs, relocation of utilities (if needed), art works if needed, terrain, but also the level of competition in tenders.
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Old July 19th, 2010, 12:45 AM   #2794
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If you have 100 people working, 3 shifts per day, 2 years of construction, € 1,000 per month, that'll sum up to € 7.2 million in wages for say a 10 km section. It's probably still 20% of the price per km.
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Old July 19th, 2010, 11:12 AM   #2795
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I think price depends most of all on the difficulty of the required works. For Example Lyulin costs already more than 10 mln. EUR per km. as there are a lot of viaducts. tunnels etc. facilities that are lacking in the Trakia lots projects.


Quote:
Bulgaria Back on the Road
Views on BG | July 19, 2010, Monday

http://novinite.com/view_news.php?id=118250

Andrew MacDowall in Sofia, Business New Europe

After years of hold-ups, Bulgaria's vital motorway construction programme appears to be flowing once again.

Anyone who has travelled on one of Bulgaria's major cross-country roads will be aware of the importance of the country's position on transcontinental transportation and trade routes, as well as the need for the highways themselves to be improved. Trucks from Turkey heading west are ubiquitous, and those from a wide range of farther-flung countries are also common. As the economies of Central and Eastern Europe and the Middle East have experienced rapid growth in recent years, volumes have risen.

However, sweeping six- or four-lane motorways become two-lane affairs with little warning, with major HGV routes passing through the centres of bucolic villages or becoming trapped in suburban bottlenecks. Meanwhile, surfaces are inconsistent - much improved on some stretches, terrible on others. The variance in quality along what are actually single continuous roads is due to the incomplete nature of Bulgaria's infrastructure investment programme, which, for all its high ambitions, has been hamstrung by political disputes, corruption, funding shortages and material price volatility. In January 2008, for example, the EU suspended much-needed payments to the Bulgarian National Road Infrastructure Fund after allegations of graft. The patchy progress in such a vital area is perhaps indicative of Bulgaria's struggle to realise its economic potential.

Nexus

Bulgaria lies on four of the 10 Pan-European transport corridors identified by the EU as crucial transcontinental links needing substantial investment to enhance Europe's transportation infrastructure. While one, along the Danube, is largely a water-borne transit route, the three others are overland routes which cross the country, occasionally intersecting and coinciding.

Corridor IV runs from Central Europe through Romania to Istanbul and Thessaloniki, with the branches dividing at Sofia. Corridor VIII is an east-west route across the Balkans from Constanta on Romania's Black Sea cost to Durres on the Adriatic in Albania. Corridor IX, meanwhile, runs from Helsinki to Alexandropoulos on Greece's Aegean coast, cutting north-south across the heart of Bulgaria from the Danube port of Ruse.

These are far more than just theoretical lines on bureaucrats' maps. They reflect not only the recent growth of inter- and intra-continental trade, with the rise of the Middle East and emerging Europe, but age-old patterns of commerce and natural transport routes; corridor VIII, for example, broadly follows the Roman Via Egnatia. They also follow key proposed energy transit lines; the path of Corridor VIII is similar to that of the Ambo oil pipeline and IV that of the Nabucco gas pipeline. Finally, in a region that has had regular outbreaks of conflict over the past two centuries, the corridors are also strategically important for defence purposes.

The development of major roads is important both for these regional reasons and to stimulate and support Bulgaria's economic growth. Its transportation infrastructure lags behind that of most other EU members, and it has not been able to capitalise on its position as much as it should have done. Now it appears that momentum behind the motorway-building programme is being restored. The centre-right government headed by Boiko Borisov, elected last summer, has pledged to complete the Trakiya, Maritsa and Lyulin motorways by the end of its term in 2013, and make substantial progress on the Struma and Black Sea motorways.

Perhaps the most publicised of Bulgaria's troubled major road projects is the Trakiya Motorway. The route of the motorway runs from Kalotina on the Serbian border to Burgas, the country's second-largest port city, on the Black Sea, passing close to Sofia and Plovdiv, nominally the country's second city (often it is reported as running from Sofia to Burgas, but the Kalotina link will also be important). It is one of the more complete of the motorways, but it was held up in 2005-2006 by a dispute with the Portuguese contractor and has remained unfinished despite this being the main route from the capital to the country's main tourist area. The June tender for the construction of a 47.7-km stretch of the motorway, between Yambol and Karnobat in the east-centre of the route, attracted 13 bids, with Bulgaria's Holding Roads placing the lowest at BGN175m (€89.45). The same month, Greek outfit Aktor was ranked top bidder for the construction of the 35.7-km link between Nova Zagora and Yambol. In February, Unified Highway Trace, another Bulgarian firm, won the tender for a 32-km section between Stara Zagora and Nova Zagora with a BGN137.86m bid. Work is expected to start by August, and once these sections are complete, the main Sofia-Burgas stretch of the Trakiya, following Corridor VIII, will be complete.

The government has also announced that another 31 km of the Maritsa motorway, between Novo Selo and Lyubimets, will be complete by year-end. The Maritsa route runs from an interchange with the Trakiya at the village of Orizovo to the Turkish border at Kapitan Andreevo, where it links to the Turkish Avrupa Otoyolu (Europe Motorway) to Istanbul, making part of Corridor IV. Only 38 km of 117 km has been completed thus far, but Bulgarian Regional Development Minister Rosen Plevneliev has said that a central 67 km stretch from Orizovo to Harmanli will be finished by June 2013, finally linking Istanbul with Sofia and other major Bulgarian cities with an unbroken European-grade motorway.

Plevneliev has also faced down vocal opposition for a substantial cash injection for the Lyulin motorway project, which will link the western outskirts of Sofia to the nascent Struma motorway (Sofia-Greece) near the industrial city of Pernik, bypassing a notorious bottleneck at Vladaya. The project, like the Trakiya, has been hobbled by long and controversial delays, with Turkish contractor Mapa Cengiz demanding a huge price hike from an original bid of €138m to €215m for the 19-km road. A compromise total of €181m was eventually arrived at, with the Bulgarian government agreeing to stump up an additional BGN86m in June. At a time when Bulgaria is paring back its budget and under pressure to make further cuts, this has aroused some controversy, despite the expectation that much of the cost can be met by EU funds. Attempting to cool criticism, Plevneliev has stated that the motorway is "62% ready" – despite only 5 km being fully complete – after significant progress this year, and parliament has set a deadline of May 2011 for completion.

Foot on the pedal

Despite the worsening fiscal situation, with the European Commission demanding that Bulgaria cut its deficit from 3.8% this year to 3% in 2011, some analysts argue that pushing ahead with infrastructure projects should be an absolute priority for the country, as it can help both stimulate growth in the short term and support it in the future. "Targeted investment in infrastructure represents a virtuous form of government stimulus," Paulius Kuncinas, regional editor for Eastern Europe and Asia at publishing and consultancy firm Oxford Business Group, tells bne. "While we are all aware of fiscal constraints facing EU nations, the lack of public investment could undermine a country's competitiveness and growth potential. It is, therefore, encouraging that Bulgaria is trying to balance austerity with selective investment in infrastructure that in fact has an economic multiplier."

But even if the Trakiya, Maritsa, and Lyulin projects are completed on time – and given the past, that should by no means be seen as a certainty – it won't be the end of the story. The Hemus motorway, which should run from Sofia to the growing port of Varna on the Black Sea, and the Struma, are still far from completion. And it appears the government has decided not to prioritise them, at least for the next year, and perhaps for this parliamentary term (though rehabilitation of finished stretches of both is ongoing).

A change of government in 2013 - or even before - could once again hold up progress. But after some difficult years, a concrete commitment to vital road infrastructure is at least an encouraging sign.
And some new photos of Lyulin Motorway Construction by FloatingShift:

Quote:
Originally Posted by FloatingShift View Post

The Junction with Sofia Ring Road








The Diamond before Malo Buchino



And further







Malo Buchino



Before the tunnel at Malo Buchino






The tunnel itself (Pernik-Sofia is finished 50%, while the Sofia-Pernik tube is 2/3 completed)







Further in Pernik direction






The tunnel at the mountain top




Further towards Pernik




























The 3rd and last tunnel







Further






Daskalovo Junction









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Old July 19th, 2010, 02:20 PM   #2796
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This is probably the first optimistic article about the infrastructure of the country that I've read for years. All of them before that were talking about the corruption and failed tenders and how the economy is suffering because of this.

Let's hope that they finish Lyulin in time.
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Old July 19th, 2010, 03:50 PM   #2797
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And some more shots by FloatingShift of the opened a month ago Dragalevci Junction of the Sofia Ring road:
















And one very strange 2 roundabouts project in Veliko Tranovo on the national road Sofia-Varna that is still unfinished but was opened for local traffic yesterday:



photos by Hakkinen, gtsofia.info







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Old July 19th, 2010, 05:11 PM   #2798
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1976: Approximately 300,000 Turkish gastarbeiters return from vacation, causing a 60 kilometer traffic jam before the Yugoslavian border. Waiting times were up to three days.

source
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Old July 26th, 2010, 03:12 PM   #2799
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This looks more like "The Big Excursion" from 1989 as i see a lot of soviet or bulgarian made vehicles on that photo.

Couple of new photos from the starting point of Lot 2(31 km. long) of Trakia motorway near Stara Zagora. They have already cleared 6 km. of the soil bed and are starting pouring the gravel bed of the motorway.










Last edited by Turnovec; July 26th, 2010 at 08:24 PM.
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Old July 27th, 2010, 01:44 PM   #2800
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...photos from the starting point of Lot 2(31 km. long) of Trakia motorway near Stara Zagora. They have already cleared 6 km. of the soil bed and are starting pouring the gravel bed of the motorway.
















Source foto.stroitelstvo.info
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