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Old April 30th, 2017, 11:55 PM   #661
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Land deal for major TV & film hub



CAPITAL & CENTRIC has completed its acquisition of the former Littlewoods building and agreed a 250 year lease with Liverpool City Council to deliver a major hub for film, television and other creative industries.

The building was constructed during 1938 in an art deco style and was used to process the betting slips from the Football Pools – which was run by the Sir John Moores, with his brother Cecil, the owners of Littlewoods.

The buildings further importance is highlighted by the contribution made to the war effort when its vast internal spaces were enlisted in the national interest during WWII. At the outbreak of the war the building’s mighty printing presses were used to print some 17 million National Registration forms in just three days.

The floors of Halifax Bombers were assembled at the building as well as barrage balloons. Its design was such that it became the nerve centre of MC5, the government agency that intercepted and censored mail to break enemy codes. Bomb shelters in the basement areas of the building still contain artwork and graffiti on the walls dating from the 1941 Wartime Blitz.

The new land deal also includes an adjacent six acre development site on Edge Lane.

Tim Heatley of CAPITAL & CENTRIC said: “This acquisition marks an important milestone for us, it is the result of more than five years hard work and the next step in realising our vision for this high profile site.

“Liverpool City Council and the Homes & Communities agency have been very supportive of our plans for this iconic building, which forms an important gateway to the city. We’re excited at the opportunity to restore the Littlewoods Buildings and give it an exciting new lease of life that will put it on a national stage and finally give it the recognition that it deserves.

“Last year we completed the speculative redevelopment of the neighbouring Bunker building, which is now fully let. Bunker has successfully attracted a mix of media and tech companies that will inspire the future of our Littlewoods scheme and we can’t wait to get started.

“Our vision for the site is to see it not just become the heart of Liverpool’s vibrant film and media industry, but a draw to companies in this sector both nationally and internationally. We aren’t looking for companies interested solely in co-location, but in collaboration, to be a part of a hub that can fully capitalise on Liverpool’s world-class offer as a filming location.

“We are in the last throws of finalising the legal agreements with the Liverpool City Region Combined Authority for gap funding to secure the long-term future of this iconic structure. We already have a significant amount of occupier interest which is testament to the standing of the building, given we haven’t yet commenced any marketing activity.”

The next phase of development represents a £35m investment from CAPITAL & CENTRIC, the project once complete will create in excess of 350 new jobs.

Councillor Malcolm Kennedy, the Liverpool City Council Cabinet Member for Regeneration said: “We’re delighted that CAPITAL & CENTRIC have now completed the acquisition of the Littlewoods site. We are well aware of their excellent track record in delivering innovative buildings and I’m sure they will handle this vital piece of regeneration with sensitivity and great imagination.

“The digital and creative industries are a multi-billion pound growth opportunity for the Liverpool City Region over the next decade and this development represents a unique opportunity to further accelerate this sector. The City Council fully support the plans that CAPITAL & CENTRIC have drawn up and look forward to working closely with them as the scheme is delivered.”
http://www.liverpoolexpress.co.uk/la...r-tv-film-hub/
This is a vital development. I will be great to see this huge building back in use!
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Old May 2nd, 2017, 10:33 PM   #662
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Ropemaker’s Place, Renshaw street, Liverpool. 74 apartments. Legacie developments

http://www.ropemaker-place.co.uk/
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Old May 2nd, 2017, 10:34 PM   #663
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Someone please offer the Greek a place to trade from in return for their site......
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Old May 3rd, 2017, 02:12 PM   #664
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Finally!
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Old June 29th, 2017, 04:00 PM   #665
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Old June 29th, 2017, 04:01 PM   #666
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Updated Liverpool Waters imagery, plus a few other projects coming along nicely...





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Old June 29th, 2017, 07:11 PM   #667
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Nice!
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Old June 30th, 2017, 02:37 PM   #668
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Looks incredibly bland in my opinion. The Liverpool riverfront is already divided with all the quality stuff to the south (the three graces, the Museum of Liverpool, Albert Dock, the cathedral etc) and the north being dominated by post-war boxes and modern plastic. Without quality materials and proper master planning this new high-rise area will look like a cheap office park.
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Old June 30th, 2017, 11:00 PM   #669
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Looks incredibly bland in my opinion. The Liverpool riverfront is already divided with all the quality stuff to the south (the three graces, the Museum of Liverpool, Albert Dock, the cathedral etc) and the north being dominated by post-war boxes and modern plastic. Without quality materials and proper master planning this new high-rise area will look like a cheap office park.
The north of the city centre is the original industrial and dock related areas of the city and is today very much still fulfilling that role despite central Liverpool spreading further in that direction. With the exception of some lost traditional warehouses this area has always been largely a trading, maritime and industrial district. The Liverpool waters visual is indicative and will be constructed over a time period in which architectural trends and styles will change therefore the end result will be very different and economy depending much better.
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Old June 30th, 2017, 11:50 PM   #670
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Originally Posted by Mr Bricks View Post
Looks incredibly bland in my opinion. The Liverpool riverfront is already divided with all the quality stuff to the south (the three graces, the Museum of Liverpool, Albert Dock, the cathedral etc) and the north being dominated by post-war boxes and modern plastic. Without quality materials and proper master planning this new high-rise area will look like a cheap office park.
theyre almost all massing indications, to illustrate the master plan...

these towers have detailed planning permission, as just a small flavour for you:

Infinity:



Lexington:



Ovatus 1 and 2:



Plaza 1821:



Hive City Docks:





many more projects with quality design in mind are proposed throughout the city.
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Old July 1st, 2017, 01:20 AM   #671
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I love many of the proposals coming out of Liverpool at the minute. Especially the talls, not to compare to any other cities. But much more appealing and better quality than any other major cities developments, in my opinion.

But that's the problem, these are proposals. In other major cities they are under construction developments.


I am waiting for pilling rigs in the ground and cores to be rising. C'mon L'pool get these under construction and get moving on to newer, bigger and better schemes. Upwards and onwards
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Old July 1st, 2017, 10:42 AM   #672
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I love many of the proposals coming out of Liverpool at the minute. Especially the talls, not to compare to any other cities. But much more appealing and better quality than any other major cities developments, in my opinion.

But that's the problem, these are proposals. In other major cities they are under construction developments.


I am waiting for pilling rigs in the ground and cores to be rising. C'mon L'pool get these under construction and get moving on to newer, bigger and better schemes. Upwards and onwards
That's kind of half true. There are a lot of schemes coming out of the ground and other cities in the U.K. have had there fair share of stalled or slow projects.

We might take a little longer in some cases in Liverpool to push towers out of the ground but as you say we do things a little better in terms of the aesthetics and form so perhaps city's such as Leeds and Manchester and so on could do with taking a leaf out of Liverpool's book on this one
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Old July 1st, 2017, 12:46 PM   #673
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The north of the city centre is the original industrial and dock related areas of the city and is today very much still fulfilling that role despite central Liverpool spreading further in that direction. With the exception of some lost traditional warehouses this area has always been largely a trading, maritime and industrial district. The Liverpool waters visual is indicative and will be constructed over a time period in which architectural trends and styles will change therefore the end result will be very different and economy depending much better.
Indeed it is indicative, however, it isn't really inspiring anyone is it? There are some amazing modern brick buildings going up in places such as London and Hamburg that would fit this area perfectly. Why not line the docks and riverside with warehouse type buildings of brick, stone or even wood? Would fit in better with both the history of the place and the three graces next door. I'm just worried Liverpool's unique skyline will be invaded by a mass of cheap plastic blocks.

Some inspiration:

Bibby's Warehouse completed in 1917 demolished in the 1980s (!).


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Old July 1st, 2017, 03:16 PM   #674
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Great stuff going on in Liverpool. Love the Liverpool waters imagery.
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Old July 1st, 2017, 04:03 PM   #675
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Indeed it is indicative, however, it isn't really inspiring anyone is it? There are some amazing modern brick buildings going up in places such as London and Hamburg that would fit this area perfectly. Why not line the docks and riverside with warehouse type buildings of brick, stone or even wood? Would fit in better with both the history of the place and the three graces next door. I'm just worried Liverpool's unique skyline will be invaded by a mass of cheap plastic blocks.

Some inspiration:

Bibby's Warehouse completed in 1917 demolished in the 1980s (!).

The Bibby warehouse was a sad loss, particularly given it has been replaced by a toys r us and Costco. But again, the visuals constantly change for Liverpool waters and are indicative of the scale more than anything else. Personally that angle of shot for the visualisation doesn't do the the composition of the proposals any justice but I do agree that we must strive for each individual building to be as impactful and skyline enhancing as possible given their setting.

The only issue I fear is in this endeavour, exacerbated by the heritage debate is that too much scrutiny will create more reasons to slow the city's development down so there has to be a balance. We cannot see more generations of Liverpool's youth for example have to leave for opportunity elsewhere as development of the economy and the built environment as a vehicle for that moves painfully slow to appease those who value a vista or a view far more than that of the needs of a major, functional and growing city.

Another issue is transport for these schemes. If this was London there would be no questions asked extension of the underground to connect this area - Liverpool is fortunate to have a metro yet there is no indictation of any clear strategy to plug Liverpool waters and the many large scale schemes emerging around it into the local and national rail network.
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Old July 1st, 2017, 04:54 PM   #676
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I see your point about the city needing investment, however, the planning mistakes of the post-war decades must not be repeated either. These arguments are not mutually exclusive. Furthermore it is far easier to attract people and investment to a city that prides itself in its heritage combining it with modern quality designs. The recent newbuilds in the area haven't really done that. This might of course change with these new developments.

Regarding transport, a tram network would probably work quite well, or better still a reconstructed overhead railway.
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Old July 1st, 2017, 07:22 PM   #677
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I see your point about the city needing investment, however, the planning mistakes of the post-war decades must not be repeated either. These arguments are not mutually exclusive. Furthermore it is far easier to attract people and investment to a city that prides itself in its heritage combining it with modern quality designs. The recent newbuilds in the area haven't really done that. This might of course change with these new developments.

Regarding transport, a tram network would probably work quite well, or better still a reconstructed overhead railway.
I think we need something more far reaching and ambitious than trams given the issues with the last attempt at their return to the city, not to mention the fact we have the asset of an underground and metro in the city that needs completing and expanding.

I don't think everything Liverpool has built in the last decade has been bad at all given the economic conditions and a lot has been filling in gaps in the city fabric. The last decade has been a period lacking some serious landmark and considered buildings though and there are too few architects and developers dominating the scene.

The heritage angle to date however has done little to attract investment and I would challenge anyone to give solid examples of how having WHS in Liverpool has done anything except hold back, delay and derail development with unworkable and illogical demands and conditions that keep derelict swathes of the waterfront just that, derelict...and all in the name of some strange notion of what makes a space historic.

Any future cityscape needs a 70/30 split in my view for heritage and modern design as sadly those who advocate heritage never usually present any alternative scheme when a project is put forward for a site and simply just reject or protest every scheme that them deem too tall or not styled in a fashion of architecture that only those with rose tinted glasses would appreciate.
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Old July 2nd, 2017, 11:21 AM   #678
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In terms of capacity a subway naturally makes more sense but trams are cheaper - having both would of course be ideal. I am not familiar with what has been proposed and rejected in Liverpool lately but I'm aware of how frustrating it is to watch nimbys and short sighted people shoot down proper developments in one's home town. I still believe that Liverpool with its unique waterfront and rich history needs to create something special when the old docks are being redeveloped - a Liverpool vernacular. This has been achieved in places like Germany and the Netherlands with great success, using local styles and materials. The old warehouses in Liverpool could serve as inspiration for architects and town planners to build new buildings in a warehouse-style.
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Old July 2nd, 2017, 05:56 PM   #679
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In terms of capacity a subway naturally makes more sense but trams are cheaper - having both would of course be ideal. I am not familiar with what has been proposed and rejected in Liverpool lately but I'm aware of how frustrating it is to watch nimbys and short sighted people shoot down proper developments in one's home town. I still believe that Liverpool with its unique waterfront and rich history needs to create something special when the old docks are being redeveloped - a Liverpool vernacular. This has been achieved in places like Germany and the Netherlands with great success, using local styles and materials. The old warehouses in Liverpool could serve as inspiration for architects and town planners to build new buildings in a warehouse-style.
I don't disagree. Liverpool could do a lot to take inspiration from Hamburg and so on but for me the city's waterfront is vast and begging for something world class which is of scale and quality so we can only hope that as the city continues to grow and move forward, which is is indisputably, then we will hopefully see a momentum that drives up the standard of development even further. Liverpool Waters has already seen some ambitious schemes spring up around it so this is entirely feasible.

I'm a big fan of particularly dutch architecture but Liverpool has often been referred to as the New York of Europe and for me we really need to live up to that tagline and brush nimbyism aside for great quality, large scale architecture both residential and more importantly commercial/office space and above all invest in the transport links to support them.
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Old August 9th, 2017, 12:30 PM   #680
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All approved yesterday by Liverpool City Council

https://www.placenorthwest.co.uk/new...ters-approved/

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