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Old June 2nd, 2016, 12:02 PM   #4081
keber
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You mean this?

Austrian police cars, presumably their first arrival into their checkpoint. This was probably the first instance that police from western country had border checkpoint in communist land.

Last edited by keber; June 2nd, 2016 at 12:38 PM.
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Old June 2nd, 2016, 01:09 PM   #4082
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And BG = Bundesgendarmerie
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Old June 2nd, 2016, 01:32 PM   #4083
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Thanks mates for explanation.

I really thought it was the Yugoslav police with the registration of Belgrade
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Old June 2nd, 2016, 01:42 PM   #4084
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SRC_100 View Post
What`s about those police cars with BG (Beograd/Belgrade) license plates?
I knew someone would ask that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by keber View Post
Austrian police cars, presumably their first arrival into their checkpoint. This was probably the first instance that police from western country had border checkpoint in communist land.
AFAIK, Slovenia wasn't communist/socialist any more (at least it changed its name in 1990 from Socialist Republic of Slovenia into Republic of Slovenia).
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Old June 2nd, 2016, 03:07 PM   #4085
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SRC_100 View Post

Thanks mates for explanation.

I really thought it was the Yugoslav police with the registration of Belgrade
I though the same.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
I knew someone would ask that.

AFAIK, Slovenia wasn't communist/socialist any more (at least it changed its name in 1990 from Socialist Republic of Slovenia into Republic of Slovenia).
Yes, in mid-1991 communism was already dead all over Europe.
That was almost 2 years after the opening of the Austro-Hungarian border, that was the first step of the fall of communism. Germany had been already re-united, Warsaw Pact countries had already held their first multi-party elections, even Soviet Union was already pursuing a pro-West policy, and will have become Russian Federation only six months later.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.

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Old June 2nd, 2016, 08:38 PM   #4086
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Yes, in mid-1991 communism was already dead all over Europe.
Well, I'm not sure about the rest of Yugoslavia.
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Old June 2nd, 2016, 10:50 PM   #4087
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Even today black&white satellite imagery is common. Google Earth has tons of it (usually not in the default imagery though).
That is a whole different reason than shortage of panchromatic films, though. DigitalGlobe satellites are all capable of taking colour images (or better said they have more spectral bands which you can then combine into a colour imagery) however the panchromatic band has better resolution, therefore Google gives you more detailed sattelite imagery in black and white. Another reason might also be that Google saved money on buying "more bands" and rather bought only one panchromatic.
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Old June 3rd, 2016, 10:59 AM   #4088
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Verso View Post
AFAIK, Slovenia wasn't communist/socialist any more (at least it changed its name in 1990 from Socialist Republic of Slovenia into Republic of Slovenia).
That is true, however the tunnel and border crossing were both planned and built back in an era of communist Yugoslavia so it was meant that western country will have border checkpoint in communist country.
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Old June 3rd, 2016, 11:54 AM   #4089
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That is true, however the tunnel and border crossing were both planned and built back in an era of communist Yugoslavia so it was meant that western country will have border checkpoint in communist country.
Was there a single joint border control station between Austria and Yugoslavia, like today on non-Schengen inter-EU borders (SLO-HR, H-RO, GR-BG)?
Tecnically, both countries were neutral back then, as neither Austria or Yugoslavia were part of NATO or Warsaw Pact, although one had a market economy and a democratic system, while the other had a planned economy and a single-party system.
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In real life, electronic toll collection was first introduced in Bergen, Norway in 1986, and well into the 21th century many countries still struggle to implement it.
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Old June 3rd, 2016, 01:47 PM   #4090
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Was there a single joint border control station between Austria and Yugoslavia, like today on non-Schengen inter-EU borders (SLO-HR, H-RO, GR-BG)?
Tecnically, both countries were neutral back then, as neither Austria or Yugoslavia were part of NATO or Warsaw Pact, although one had a market economy and a democratic system, while the other had a planned economy and a single-party system.
The whole thing was made because of the lack of space on the Austrian side were there were SLO + A controls for entering SLO and so they agreed for vice versa in Slovenia.
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Old June 3rd, 2016, 01:58 PM   #4091
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Was there a single joint border control station between Austria and Yugoslavia, like today on non-Schengen inter-EU borders (SLO-HR, H-RO, GR-BG)?
No, there were two separate controls one after another.

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The whole thing was made because of the lack of space on the Austrian side were there were SLO + A controls for entering SLO and so they agreed for vice versa in Slovenia.
What lack of space? It was done so because they didn't want traffic jams to extend into the tunnel (but the same wasn't done by the Loibl Tunnel).
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Old June 3rd, 2016, 03:05 PM   #4092
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Austrian side is pretty steep, they had to carve a lot, but I guess you are right.

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Old June 3rd, 2016, 03:36 PM   #4093
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Verso is right, it was for safety reasons. At time of the opening this tunnel was considered for one of the safest one tube tunnels in the world if not the safest.
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Old June 3rd, 2016, 07:29 PM   #4094
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Is because of very strict privacy laws?
basemap.at has high-quality images of complete Austria:

basemap.at/application/index.html#{%22center%22:[1585862.9124038909,6035224.110369858],%22zoom%22:15,%22rotation%22:0,%22layers%22:%2200010000000%22}


Bing too.
So it's just a Google problem...
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Old June 3rd, 2016, 07:35 PM   #4095
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Quote:
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No, there were two separate controls one after another.

What lack of space? It was done so because they didn't want traffic jams to extend into the tunnel (but the same wasn't done by the Loibl Tunnel).
not for lack of space, but an other easy reason

first you have to pass the border control, only if yes you was allowed to use the tunnel
- no traffic jams in the tunnel caused from controls because the controls are already done
- no one has to go back through the very long tunnel if not allowed to enter the other country
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Old June 3rd, 2016, 07:38 PM   #4096
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And you didn't have to pay for the tunnel if you weren't allowed to cross the border.
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Old June 5th, 2016, 02:07 PM   #4097
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I took a few pictures from the extension of the "A5 Nordautobahn" towards the Czech border, see the ASFINAG page http://www.asfinag.at/unterwegs/baup...ei-drasenhofen for project details (in German)

The pictures are already a couple of weeks old, but maybe still interesting.

At the end of the current motorway at Schrick, traffic is diverted to the newly constructed national road "B7"; the old alignment will be used for one of the motorway carriageways, the new road is narrower, as it will only carry limited amounts of traffic. Map location: http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=15/48.5206/16.6301




A few new bridges were constructed on the new B7, on the old B7 there was a continous damn.


On the right hand is the old B7, surface is being removed




Approaching the new exit Wilfersdorf Süd (Map: http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=15/48.5613/16.6327), under the bridge you can see the new motorway alignment. At this exit, there is also a connection to the new Mistelbach bypass (B40/B46 in http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=14/48.5609/16.5796), which was opened end of last year, with a small section (L3168) opened just last month.




On the bridge over the future motorway; where we currently have the traffic lights, the final plan is to have roundabouts, even though that seems a bit narrow..



We are returning to the old B7, on the right hand side a part of the old road that was demolished already, this will not be used for the new motorway.


Driving in the opposite direction, before the Wilfersdorf Süd exit - the old road continued to the left, we turn right on the new alignment:





New motorway on the left hand side:




Merging back to the old B7 close to Schrick




A bit more northern the B7 intersects again with the A5 extension, at the future Wilfersdorf Nord interchange, map at http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=15/48.6038/16.6574:

Driving northwards, the B7 was realigned (maybe just temporarily), to allow for building a birdge over the motorway





Here the new motorway crosses the current B7:


Back to the old alignment:


Driving southbound, to the new alignment; the old surface on the right hand was already partially removed:



Crossing the new motorway:


Back to the old B7 alignment:


If everything goes according to plan, the new motorway will open at the end of 2017, thus around 18 months time remaining.
In 2017, they should also start working a bit more northwards, at the Drasenhofen bypass just south of the border. As a reminder - that bypass will be a single carriageway in the beginning, with an upgrade to full motorway standard planned when/if the Czechs upgrade their connection from Brno to the border.
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Old June 12th, 2016, 02:09 PM   #4098
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On the Austria A8 there are some major works undergoing between exits Ried im Innkreis and Haag. There's a 12 km long construction site, and, as far as I can tell, I think they are widening the motorway to have a full hard shoulder (I remember before the works started that the hard shoulder was very narrow - you could hardly stop a car there without crossing the line). Some pictures taken yesterday:









The motorway traffic has now 4 narrow lanes to drive on (2 + 1+1). The issue is that if you are on one of the "1" lanes you are stuck for the next 12 km behind all other traffic. The speed limit was 80 km/h, but the guy in front of me drove the entire 12 km with 55-60 km/h.
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Old June 12th, 2016, 03:21 PM   #4099
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bogdymol View Post
On the Austria A8 there are some major works undergoing between exits Ried im Innkreis and Haag. There's a 12 km long construction site, and, as far as I can tell, I think they are widening the motorway to have a full hard shoulder (I remember before the works started that the hard shoulder was very narrow - you could hardly stop a car there without crossing the line). Some pictures taken yesterday:

The motorway traffic has now 4 narrow lanes to drive on (2 + 1+1). The issue is that if you are on one of the "1" lanes you are stuck for the next 12 km behind all other traffic. The speed limit was 80 km/h, but the guy in front of me drove the entire 12 km with 55-60 km/h.
your report is complete right, nice pictures, add some information:

first take the right lane, it is not so narrow, trucks driving always 75-80 and you overtake the slow driving cars on the narrow left lane, additional you have a better view on the construction site during driving slow

this is a 2 summer construction site, this year in direction east in a 2+1 - 1 and next year summer than 1 - 1+2 in west direction

(german link - offical project description)
http://www.asfinag.at/unterwegs/baup...E_I8LKwiYWAPVa
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Old June 14th, 2016, 04:31 AM   #4100
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I'm confused



If there is a "NO OVERTAKING" sign, then why does the road have dashed lines or broken lines on it? (which in my understanding means that overtaking is permitted as long as it is done safely)
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