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Old May 1st, 2009, 08:12 PM   #181
hkskyline
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Source : http://www.pbase.com/ipenning/japan_shinkansen





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Old May 6th, 2009, 04:49 PM   #182
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Making of the bullet train
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Japanese TV program of the high speed test train "Fastech" (Eng dub)
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Old May 9th, 2009, 04:49 AM   #183
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The 'old' shinkansen 300 still looks good nowadays.
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Old September 16th, 2009, 08:59 AM   #184
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Bullet train operator eyes foreign destinations
13 September 2009
Financial Times

It is the archetypal image of how modern Japan has fused technical excellence with respect for tradition: a Shinkansen - or bullet - train speeds at 300kph (186mph) past Mount Fuji, whose snow-capped beauty has been celebrated over centuries in woodcut prints.

However, if JR Central, operator of the Tokaido high-speed line that passes Mount Fuji, succeeds in exporting the technology worldwide, Shinkansen trains may become just as much a symbol of California or Abu Dhabi as they are of Japan.

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JR Central's efforts promise to sharpen already intense competition for the mainly European providers of trains and other equipment to the growing number of countries developing high-speed passenger rail systems.

Ironically, the export drive also comes as JR Central's focus at home turns to developing a different technology - based on maglev trains lifted by magnetic force above the track - for its home market.

Both the export drive and introduction of the new, more energy-hungry technology will need to overcome formidable hurdles.

The challenges reflect the unusual history of Japan's pioneering high-speed rail network. Because the country's traditional rail track was narrower than the 1,435mm international standard, it was unsuitable for the new trains' speeds. The country instead built a dedicated standard-gauge high-speed network segregated from the rest of the network, with high bridges and wide tunnels. Anyone travelling to a city off the Shinkansen network has to change trains, but the carriages are some of the world's widest and the system is unencumbered by slow-moving freight or commuter trains.

Since the chances of a crash with another train or obstacle are minimal, Shinkansen trains can dispense with the heavy strengthening structures found in most rail vehicle bodies. That and the need for only minimal suspension on the well-constructed track have made Shinkansen trains consistently lighter and more energy-efficient than most fast trains.

Any country wanting to take JR Central's advice on building a high-speed rail system will need a system very like Japan's to benefit safely from the technology's advantages, however.

"As far as safety is concerned, you have to have a dedicated high-speed track and complete management of the system," said Tsutomu Morimura, director-general of JR Central's general technology division.

Lord Adonis, UK transport secretary, last week ruled out such a system for Britain's future high-speed lines. It was important that cities not immediately on the first high-speed lines continued to enjoy direct services using both new routes and existing track, he said. Similar objections elsewhere in Europe are likely to keep the continent's €1.5bn-a-year ($2.2bn) high-speed market a bastion of the big three international trainmakers - France's Alstom, Germany's Siemens and Canada's Bombardier.

The technology could interest places with minimal existing passenger networks. Taiwan and one line in mainland China have already bought elements of the Shinkansen system. Networks planned for parts of the USA, particularly California, and some Arab countries could follow suit.

The Shinkansen, though, is no longer the brightest star in Japanese rail's firmament. A magnetic levitation train powered by super-conducting magnets set a world rail speed record of 581kph at JR Central's Yamanashi test track in 2003 and the company wants to build a Maglev line 340km from Tokyo to Nagoya, part-way along its ageing Tokyo to Osaka line. The journey will be shortened from one hour 40 minutes to 40 minutes.

Whether that system can produce the reliability and efficiency of the Shinkansen may determine whether it might become a candidate for export.
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Old September 16th, 2009, 02:44 PM   #185
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The main reason why the Shinkansen uses many bridges lies in the terrain and the extensive land use of Japan. A big part of the country is covered by mountains, the Shinkansen doesn't go round them but uses tunnels to go trough them. The mountains are not the reason why the Shinkansen is build on bridges. But because of the mountains every single bit of land that is flat is used for agriculture or has been turned into an urban area. This means that the land prices are high and that there are many local roads and railroads that should be crossed by the Shinkansen.

Building the lines high means less impact on the ground. It uses less valuable land and there's no need to build new costly costly tunnels and bridges over under the line for the local infrastructure.

Another reason just as important why the Shinkansen is completely grade-spearated - or, let's say why TGV and ICE aren't - is that Japan needed to build the Shinkansen network from scratch because it's standard gauge (and the rest of the Japanese rail lines are narrow gauge). So, if you build a new line dedicated for high-speed trains it absolutely makes sense to build it grade-separated.
By contrast, in Germany and France both conventional and high-speed trains use the same gauge. So it's absolutely reasonable to let them use the elder lines to provide the services in much larger regions. In large parts of Germany building dedicated high-speed lines just parallel to the existing rails wouldn't make sense anyway (due to the lower density of population, the design of the German rail network and the lower passerger numbers on single lines mainly).
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Old September 16th, 2009, 10:59 PM   #186
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The question was not why the Shinkansen system is completely grade-separated, but more about how it was built. All dedicated high speed lines in Europ and Japan are completely grade-separated without any exceptions. The difference is that in Europe you don't see high viaducts that continue for kilometers long high above cities, villages and rice fields like the Shinkansen in Japan.

Btw, the Shinkansen network is not completely grade separated. On two lines the Shinkansen shares the tracks with conventional trains, the Akita Shinkansen/Tazawako Line and the Yamagata Shinkansen/Ou Main Line. There are even level crossings and parts of the line are just single track.
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Old September 17th, 2009, 02:05 PM   #187
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But the Yamagata and Akita Shinkansen aren't really true high speed lines anyway, they are just normal lines that happened to have Shinkansen train service. Those stretches, of the Tohoky Shinkansen line, have a 130 km/h speed limit on them as most other JR limited express lines in Japan, so you can't classify them as high speed lines, in the same sense as the other Shinkansen Lines.
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Old September 17th, 2009, 05:39 PM   #188
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Is everybody just reading half posts and not the discussion or the questions asked before?
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Old September 21st, 2009, 10:05 PM   #189
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Old September 24th, 2009, 10:59 PM   #190
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Shes 27, she looks like 17 and driving trains 270km/h
I just wonder is she pointing finger and talking in normal work also?
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Old September 24th, 2009, 11:57 PM   #191
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...so cool!
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Old September 25th, 2009, 07:07 PM   #192
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I think most Japanese trains are fitted with a black box, so they have to yell out the speed boards, the restricted speeds and so forth...
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Old September 25th, 2009, 08:58 PM   #193
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really love the Shinkansen 500-serie design
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Old September 25th, 2009, 10:11 PM   #194
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I think most Japanese trains are fitted with a black box, so they have to yell out the speed boards, the restricted speeds and so forth...
It might also be a way to make sure that drivers stay alert and don't fall asleep. IIRC, train drivers in Japan are required to salute passing trains for that reason.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 03:32 AM   #195
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I think most Japanese trains are fitted with a black box, so they have to yell out the speed boards, the restricted speeds and so forth...
It's called "Yubi sashi kakunin" meaning pointing finger confirmation. It's like a mental checklist so the driver does everything by the book.
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Old September 26th, 2009, 07:50 PM   #196
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great videos. tnx for sharing
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Old September 27th, 2009, 03:01 PM   #197
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It's called "Yubi sashi kakunin" meaning pointing finger confirmation. It's like a mental checklist so the driver does everything by the book.
and it is done every day in normal service? WOW i know Japanese are diffrent from us Europeans but it seems like from another planet, i can't imagine anyone here doing same thing. We have checklists but in daily routine they often are done inside ones head without loud speaking not to mention pointing your finger.
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Old September 27th, 2009, 09:48 PM   #198
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Everyday and on every train.

I also read a Dutch train forum and every now and then Japan comes up in the discussions. It's always brought up by railway enthusiast and not by the train drivers that also post there. They always get a bit angry when the comparison is made between Holland and Japan, especially when the topic is punctuality. The train drivers know that they have to completely change the way they work if they want to achieve the same punctuality as in Japan. And that probably includes something like the Yubisashi kakunin. But the work ethics are just too different to run the Dutch Railways like the Japanese. So we have to be put up with train delays because the train driver didn't want to leave before finishing his coffee in the canteen.
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Old September 28th, 2009, 03:26 AM   #199
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Originally Posted by perdurabo View Post
and it is done every day in normal service? WOW i know Japanese are diffrent from us Europeans but it seems like from another planet, i can't imagine anyone here doing same thing. We have checklists but in daily routine they often are done inside ones head without loud speaking not to mention pointing your finger.
Actually I have heard that this was picked up first at safety is absolute priority facilities like nuclear reactor facilities, rocket launch mission control, and so on.
Safety of train operation is also vital so it is only natural that it is practiced on trains as well.
By the way, it is useful at home and office like locking up, since you'll automatically realize if you had missed something during final inspection.
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Old September 28th, 2009, 12:58 PM   #200
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Actually I have heard that this was picked up first at safety is absolute priority facilities like nuclear reactor facilities, rocket launch mission control, and so on.
Precisely, it's also done by flight crews on airplanes (pre-flight checks- confirmations done by voice). Why shouldn't drivers of trains do the same?- after all they are responsible for the safety of similar numbers of passengers as pilots of commercial airliners are.
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