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Old April 13th, 2013, 03:54 AM   #621
Bannor
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This might have been posted before, but its quite good:

http://youtu.be/VZjYL847KnI
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Old April 13th, 2013, 05:49 AM   #622
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Although only in Japanese, I believe this vid provides better information about the Japanese Shinkansen system as a whole.

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Old April 13th, 2013, 10:23 AM   #623
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamuraiBlue View Post
Although only in Japanese, I believe this vid provides better information about the Japanese Shinkansen system as a whole.

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Old April 13th, 2013, 04:09 PM   #624
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Quote:
Although only in Japanese, I believe this vid provides better information about the Japanese Shinkansen system as a whole.
That's a good one, produced by TV Asahi (curiously the one uploaded was broadcast on their Hokkaido affiliate, HTB), though a bit outdated now politically, the Florida HSR proposal was still in play before Rick Scott deep-sixed it, and Maehara was still transport minister, lol. It indeed gives a good overall picture of the shinkansen system, especially interesting are the segments on catenary/track maintenance and the safety drill/simulation at the CTC center.

The program asks if the strict operating practices of the shinkansen can be duplicated in the US, given the differences in culture (as embodied in practices such as yubisashi kukunin). The JR Central officials responds in the affirmative, saying that the practices are firmly based on objective data and the knowhow of professionals, and thus can be understood in other cultural contexts.
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Old April 13th, 2013, 04:14 PM   #625
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How are Shinkansen operating practices different from other well established high speed rail systems (TGV, ICE, AVE etc.)?
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Old April 13th, 2013, 07:54 PM   #626
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
How are Shinkansen operating practices different from other well established high speed rail systems (TGV, ICE, AVE etc.)?
I'm not familiar with the European systems enough to make a definitive comparison, though the program above refers to the Japanese emphasis on punctuality, which is a function of a number of factors on various levels, such as:
1. completely segregated HSR lines, with no grade crossings anywhere, with no sharing of city and terminal trackage with conventional lines
2. fixed length trainsets (as much as possible), with trains stopping at exact spots clearly marked for passengers, to reduce dwell time
3. adherence to a 15 second interval timetable (similar tolerances are followed on SBB I have read)- trains more than 60 seconds off schedule are considered "late", not "on time if within 5 minutes of published schedule" as is the practice on some railways.
4. high availability of trainsets due to a precise maintenance regimen- a while back the head of SNCF made a comment that shinkansen trainsets have a lower failure rate per tens of thousands of km compared with TGV trainsets
5. an awareness of adhering to the timetable on all staff levels, from drivers keeping synchronized pocket watches to train cleaning staff cleaning carriages in short order.

Other points:
-quick turnarounds at terminal stations (increased trainset utilization and less trackage needed)
-emphasis on high average speed, not high top speed

More about conventional railways than high speed ones, but this document may be interesting:
http://it13rail.ch/downloads/present..._Hofstra_K.pdf
as well as this:
http://signalling.wordpress.com/2011...gnals-are-key/
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Old April 13th, 2013, 08:13 PM   #627
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
I'm not familiar with the European systems enough to make a definitive comparison, though the program above refers to the Japanese emphasis on punctuality, which is a function of a number of factors on various levels, such as:
1. completely segregated HSR lines, with no grade crossings anywhere, with no sharing of city and terminal trackage with conventional lines
2. fixed length trainsets (as much as possible), with trains stopping at exact spots clearly marked for passengers, to reduce dwell time
3. adherence to a 15 second interval timetable (similar tolerances are followed on SBB I have read)- trains more than 60 seconds off schedule are considered "late", not "on time if within 5 minutes of published schedule" as is the practice on some railways.
4. high availability of trainsets due to a precise maintenance regimen- a while back the head of SNCF made a comment that shinkansen trainsets have a lower failure rate per tens of thousands of km compared with TGV trainsets
5. an awareness of adhering to the timetable on all staff levels, from drivers keeping synchronized pocket watches to train cleaning staff cleaning carriages in short order.

Other points:
-quick turnarounds at terminal stations (increased trainset utilization and less trackage needed)
-emphasis on high average speed, not high top speed

More about conventional railways than high speed ones, but this document may be interesting:
http://it13rail.ch/downloads/present..._Hofstra_K.pdf
as well as this:
http://signalling.wordpress.com/2011...gnals-are-key/
There is a slightly different mindset in Europe. Just as in Japan dedicated lines are always grade segregated and usually exclusively for high speed passenger rail (some segments allow freight), but it is considered an asset to be able to run high speed trains also on conventional rail. Costs are reduces and more destinations could be reached that way. The closest system to Japan in this aspect is probably Spain - they are forced into more segregation by choosing to build HSR on a different gauge than the local network.

HSR in Europe is quite punctual particularly when compared with local systems, but I don't think any network here can claim Japanese level of punctuality. SBB might be the most punctual system in Europe (no high speed train here, though) - they even apologise if the train is 2 min late which other Europeans find funny

I can't really comment about train lengths or corporate cultures....
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Old April 13th, 2013, 09:49 PM   #628
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
The closest system to Japan in this aspect is probably Spain - they are forced into more segregation by choosing to build HSR on a different gauge than the local network.
Also Japan HSL are completely segregated because of a different gauge (to be honest beside variable gauge trains in Spain there is a 22 km double gauge line with mixed HS and normal traffic).
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Old April 13th, 2013, 10:18 PM   #629
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
Also Japan HSL are completely segregated because of a different gauge (to be honest beside variable gauge trains in Spain there is a 22 km double gauge line with mixed HS and normal traffic).
You mean the one to Huesca? It's used by just one HS train a day so I think we can ignore it for all practical purposes...
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Old April 13th, 2013, 10:19 PM   #630
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
More about conventional railways than high speed ones, but this document may be interesting:
http://it13rail.ch/downloads/present..._Hofstra_K.pdf
On page 4 the two Shinkansen lines are shown as not connected in Tokyo station. Is that true? Why? Different frequency of the overhead line (50/60 Hz)?Are they connected in another point?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
You mean the one to Huesca? It's used by just one HS train a day so I think we can ignore it for all practical purposes...
I thought there were also some Avant (another type of HST) services.
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Old April 13th, 2013, 10:39 PM   #631
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
I thought there were also some Avant (another type of HST) services.
I re-checked for some random date later this month and there are 2 AVE's and 6 Regional/Intercity per day. Still not a serious traffic.
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Old April 14th, 2013, 11:51 AM   #632
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
On page 4 the two Shinkansen lines are shown as not connected in Tokyo station. Is that true? Why? Different frequency of the overhead line (50/60 Hz)?Are they connected in another point?
Yes it's true, the Tohoku and Tokaido Shinkansen are not connected. There is no other connection between the East and the West lines, but depending of how the future Hokuriku Shinkansen will be connected to Osaka then there might be a connection in the future.
The difference in power is one reason, not many Shinkansen trains are able to run on both grids, there are about 30 trains that have this feature (if my calculations are correct), and most of them are running on the Nagano Shinkansen, since that line is part 60 Hz and part 50 Hz. All the new E/W7 trains will also be dual frequency to be able to run on the extension of the Nagano Shinkansen, the Hokuriku Shinkansen.
Also another big reason is that the Tokaido Shinkansen is filled to the bursting point as it is, and they don't have space for more trains from the Tohoku Shinkansen. Aslo JR Central is adamant to only run 16 car trains with 1323 seats to make it easy for them if they need to change trains, etc. on the Tokaido Shinkansen, where as JR East run many different types of trains on the Tohoku Shinkansen because they run many types of services and also have several branches when going north.
What you need to remember is that most passengers are going to or from Tokyo not through, so having a connection makes it easier for each company to run as many trains as possible for a better service, and also it's not that hard to change between the lines anyway so it won't take much time for those that want to go through the city.
It would be possible to connect them, it might happen when the Chuo Shinkansen is fully built since it will free up capacity on the Tokaido Shinkansen which would make it possible to have a more flexible train schedules.
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Old April 14th, 2013, 01:32 PM   #633
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Thank you.

But I'm amazed that there is not even a service link. I know that the two Shinkansen lines are operated by two different companies, but in Europe usually even metro/subway lines are usually linked to main rail networks, even if vehicles are exchanged rarely.
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Old April 14th, 2013, 04:00 PM   #634
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
More about conventional railways than high speed ones, but this document may be interesting:
http://it13rail.ch/downloads/present..._Hofstra_K.pdf

I've seen parts of this presentation before and there are several points I have a problem with:
  • I don't think it's fair to compare Tokyo with Utrecht CS. If you compare the track layout of Kyoto without the Shinkansen tracks (as seen here on Wikipedia) with Utrecht CS, you will see they make a much better comparison.
  • A few pages later, if you would have taken the Japanese train drivers view 50 meters more to the right (where there is an entire station) you would have had a similar view.
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Old April 14th, 2013, 08:30 PM   #635
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Beside that, Tokyo is a terminus for most lines while Utrecht is a junction of 6 lines.
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Old April 14th, 2013, 09:42 PM   #636
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SamuraiBlue View Post
Although only in Japanese, I believe this vid provides better information about the Japanese Shinkansen system as a whole.

Can't be compared really.... Your video is pure propaganda in its form, and completely gibberish for someone not understanding japanese.

While the BBC documentary goes in dept on the technology and principples used.

So the videos are radically different...
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Old April 16th, 2013, 08:51 PM   #637
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Toyota Bōshoku secures order for E7 / W7 GranClass seats

Official press release:
www.toyota-boshoku.com/common/jp/pdf/130416.pdf

They normally manufacture seats for automobiles, but their first contract for railcars will be for the E7 / W7 series trains on the Hokuriku Shinkansen, being developed jointly by JR East and JR West. They will provide seats for the GranClass car.

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Old April 17th, 2013, 08:52 PM   #638
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東海道新幹線、12年度6%増 輸送実績
http://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXNAS...10C13A4TJ1000/

JR Central announced financial performance results for FY2012 on 2013.04.17. Annual ridership on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen showed a 6% year-over-year increase, marking the third straight year of consecutive growth after rebounding from the effects of the Great East Japan Earthquake in FY2011 thanks to growing tourist numbers, such as from the Tōkyō Sky Tree. Business passengers also showed stable growth, increasing 1% for the first half of April.
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Old April 17th, 2013, 08:52 PM   #639
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自動改札や可動柵設置 北陸新幹線金沢駅
http://www.toyama.hokkoku.co.jp/subp...0130417105.htm

On 2013.04.16, the JRTT revealed details of the new Kanazawa Station on the Hokuriku Shinkansen, set to be completed in 2014.09. Specifically, the station will be four tracks (no surprise here), and the station building will be a three-story structure.

The 1,700 sq m first floor will house the station offices, ticketing hall, and multi-purpose room (for nursing, etc.); the current staffed ticket counter (Midori no Madoguchi) will be relocated adjacent to the faregate array. The 1,400 sq m second floor will house the waiting room, fully accessible restrooms, and the transfer gates to zairaisen trains. The third floor will be the platform level. Platforms will be 312 m long (i.e., 12 carlengths) and reach 9 m in width at the widest point.
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Old April 17th, 2013, 08:53 PM   #640
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Hokkaidō Prefecture produced a promo video for the Hokkaidō Shinkansen. Will definitely make getting to Hokkaidō by train much easier… The limited expresses aren’t bad, but they are still slower, and you have to transfer at least once at Shin-Aomori, sometimes a second time at Hakodate just to get to Sapporo.

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