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Old May 14th, 2013, 09:48 AM   #681
k.k.jetcar
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JR Kyushu could also have asked for N700s with the 800 nose design just to differentiate themselves from JR West. In a few years you will only see N700 variants south of Tokyo (Not that they are bad, but it's to much of a monoculture for me)
Why add to cost for a cosmetic reason, that would have no effect on revenue. Anyway, the N700 nose design is highly efficient, and is designed for the conditions on the line. JR Kyushu just painted the trainsets a different color.

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I wonder if they changed it now that the 500's are limited to 285 km/h in Hikari/Kodama service.
Doubt they would bother to change gearing (more cost) if it was not necessary, especially for trainsets nearing the end of their service life.
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Old May 14th, 2013, 01:24 PM   #682
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It may be just cosmetic, but company identity is also very important. Have you realised that except for the N700, which is now used by 3 companies, and the future E7/W7 I can't think of any other post-JNR model in Japan that is not company exclusive.

Changing gearing may cost more, but a 500 may not be able to reach the travel times of the other trainsets because of it. Especially since the 700 was designed to be quicker to 270 km/h then the 500. On the other hand: The 500 replaced the 300 which was even slower.
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Old May 15th, 2013, 11:10 AM   #683
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Originally Posted by M-NL View Post
In fact given that the 700T does 300 km/h there is no reason why the 800 couldn't also. JR Kyushu could also have asked for N700s with the 800 nose design just to differentiate themselves from JR West. In a few years you will only see N700 variants south of Tokyo (Not that they are bad, but it's to much of a monoculture for me)
700T bogies are based off the 500系 rather than 700系 to ensure 300+ km/h operating speeds. The record for THSR is 315 km/h, although the system is future-proofed for speeds of 350 km/h.

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Thing is the difference between service speed and design speed. The 500 series might have a higher top speed then the N700, but accelerates slower because of it's taller gearing. I wonder if they changed it now that the 500's are limited to 285 km/h in Hikari/Kodama service.
Ah, thanks for making that clear. That was what I was wondering--so they traded the taller gearing for faster acceleration. Just wondering; is it possible to have multiple gears for trains (kind of like a bicycle)? :P
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Old May 15th, 2013, 01:51 PM   #684
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Yes, that exists. The DB V90 and the SNCF BB 8500/17000/25500 all have this feature, but can only be switched while stationary. Also more modern diesel hydraulic trains with Voith transmissions have multi stage torque converters, effectively creating multiple gears. In the past a lot of trains with clutch and gearbox drive have existed.
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Old May 15th, 2013, 02:47 PM   #685
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Yes, that exists. The DB V90 and the SNCF BB 8500/17000/25500 all have this feature, but can only be switched while stationary. Also more modern diesel hydraulic trains with Voith transmissions have multi stage torque converters, effectively creating multiple gears. In the past a lot of trains with clutch and gearbox drive have existed.
Is this... in any way possible for electric bullet trains? :P
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Old May 15th, 2013, 06:07 PM   #686
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Possible? Yes.
Would they do it? Most likely no.

It's too complex work well in the real world, it would require a lot more maintenance than what is necessary today. Also trains like the N700 works very well without it, and still have superb performance. Like it can easily do 330 km/h and accelerates faster than any other HSR train, it can even accelerate at the same rate as a Transrapid train all the way up to 270 km/h.
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Old May 16th, 2013, 08:43 AM   #687
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Exactly. The problem used to be the power switching technology. Resistor control DC and 25kV AC) or transformer stepping (15kV AC) power control was slow reacting and because of the steps it wasn't easy to go to the traction limits. Nowadays with the 3-phase IGBT control that problem doesn't exist anymore.

But one thing remains interesting there: A TGV has only 8 out of 26 axles driven, an ICE2 8 out of 32, an ICE3 16 out of 32 axles. The Shinkansens are a different story: the usual layout is all axles driven except for the end cars. That means less power per driving axle and potentially less traction problems. Several bogies may fail before the train needs to be taken out of service. Downside: it's more expensive to manufacture. But given that a 16 car 700 series costs 4 billion yen (about 30 million euro) a Shinkansen set is still much cheaper then an 8 car TGV POS at around 35 million euros (taken from the Fyra tender). The extra cost of the TGV probably goes into the multi system setup and the fact it needs several ATC systems. The Shinkansen N700 is 25 kV 60 Hz and DS-ATC only.
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Old May 16th, 2013, 01:29 PM   #688
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pics taken by me 2 wks ago



Shinjuku to Hakone "Romancecar"





Ueno-Narita skyliner

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Old May 23rd, 2013, 06:00 AM   #689
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Speaking of the Shinkansen, when I rode the train between Tokyo and Kyoto in 1985, the train had a dedicated car that served food--and I think some trains were equipped with full dining cars. Did they drop this because once the faster 300, 500 and 700 Series trainsets arrived, the faster transit speed eliminating the need for a dedicated food service car? (I remember back then, a one-way trip on the Hikari train from Tokyo to Hakata took nearly seven hours! Today, the N700 trainsets can travel the same distance on the Nozomi train in just under five hours.)
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Old May 23rd, 2013, 01:34 PM   #690
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Originally Posted by sacto7654 View Post
Speaking of the Shinkansen, when I rode the train between Tokyo and Kyoto in 1985, the train had a dedicated car that served food--and I think some trains were equipped with full dining cars. Did they drop this because once the faster 300, 500 and 700 Series trainsets arrived, the faster transit speed eliminating the need for a dedicated food service car? (I remember back then, a one-way trip on the Hikari train from Tokyo to Hakata took nearly seven hours! Today, the N700 trainsets can travel the same distance on the Nozomi train in just under five hours.)
Basically it's due to economic efficiency for EACH companies. Remember the Tokyo-Hakata route is shared by two operators. They gain more revenue by selling seats not meals. There were not many variety in the menu and was not worth the price compared to the bento boxes you can pick-up at the station.
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Old May 23rd, 2013, 07:33 PM   #691
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As far as I remember they sell pretty good bentos on-board, too!
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Old May 24th, 2013, 03:01 AM   #692
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Basically it's due to economic efficiency for EACH companies. Remember the Tokyo-Hakata route is shared by two operators. They gain more revenue by selling seats not meals. There were not many variety in the menu and was not worth the price compared to the bento boxes you can pick-up at the station.
True. According to my brother, he remembers on a recent trip to Japan riding the Nozomi train from Tokyo to Kyoto and said their are Ekiben vendors all over Tokyo Station and Kyoto Station--including the kiosks on the train platforms!
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Old May 24th, 2013, 03:43 AM   #693
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re. on board meal service...
Leaving aside the economic/cost factors and the speed-up effects on services, (and SamuraiBlue alluded to this), the meal selection just wasn't attractive to customers anymore. The original dining car service on Japanese government railways exclusively served Western style food in an age when the general public rarely (if ever) ate things like spaghetti or steak or hamburger. For the most part into the JNR age the dining car service menus stuck to this Western menu policy, with a few exceptions. Starting in the high growth-era post war, Western cuisine became more common, and by the 1970's and 80's, widespread enough that you could get what the dining cars offered at the corner kissaten or shokudo, even in the lowliest country town. Heck, in the 1970's people were eating at KFC and McDonalds, so eating in a dining car wasn't a novelty, at least menu-wise.

Last edited by k.k.jetcar; May 24th, 2013 at 05:47 AM.
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Old May 25th, 2013, 10:49 AM   #694
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Old May 31st, 2013, 10:25 AM   #695
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Anything news and update for E7/W7 Shinkansen, dual gauge train, and the hokkaido shinkansen what are the latest development about this 3 things?
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Old May 31st, 2013, 11:41 AM   #696
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Anything news and update for E7/W7 Shinkansen, dual gauge train, and the hokkaido shinkansen what are the latest development about this 3 things?
E7/W7- a naming contest will be held this coming month. The winning entry will be announced sometime this autumn or later.

Hokkaido Shinkansen- there was a ceremony on the 29th of this month marking the beginning of construction of the new Kikonai Shinkansen Station.
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Old June 1st, 2013, 07:05 AM   #697
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It'll be very interesting to see what will be the name of the limited express and all-stops trains that will run on the Hokuriku Shinkansen line when it opens in March 2015. More importantly, will the E7/W7's be used exclusively on limited express service and the all-stops service use modified E2 trainsets.
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Old June 1st, 2013, 10:16 AM   #698
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I'm pretty sure that on the last update on E7/W7 that was posted here, was that the older E2 would only go as far as to Nagano in the beginning. So it would be safe to bet that, initially at least, all the services beyond Nagano would be E7/W7.
It may end up something like what JR-East have on Tohoku Shinkansen.
Where the Asama will be all-stop to Nagano only, then one of the new services will be limited stop to Nagano and then all stop from there on and then lastly a limited stop for the whole route.
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Old June 6th, 2013, 12:47 AM   #699
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There was an unusual sight a few days ago, with an E6 Super Komachi being hauled by freight locomotive on narrow-gauge (1,067 mm) zairaisen track from Kawasaki’s Hyōgo Plant in Kōbe City to its final destination at a JR East railyard in Akita City. Most Shinkansen cars are delivered by boat and trailer, but since JR East’s mini-Shinkansen have the loading gauge of narrow-gauge zairaisen, they can be placed on narrow-gauge bogies for delivery via rail.

This particular delivery took three days from 2013.05.31 to 2013.06.02. Some videos:

From KHI to Hyōgo Station:



On the Tōkaidō Main Line in the JR West and JR Central service areas:



In the Kantō area:

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Old June 6th, 2013, 12:49 AM   #700
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Shinkansen viaduct track-laying begins in Hokkaidō
北海道新幹線:レール敷設工事始まる 北斗市

http://mainichi.jp/area/hokkaido/new...10003000c.html

The first track laying in Hokkaidō on viaducts for the Hokkaidō Shinkansen began on 2013.05.17 in Hokuto City. Track laying inside tunnels is already complete, so the sections in question cover about 37 km (excluding tunnels) between the Ōyachi area (near Kikonai Station) and the interim terminus at Shin-Hakodate.

A ceremony was held at the east end of the 530 m Mantarō Tunnel (万太郎トンネル) between Shin-Hakodate and Kikonai, with the first two 250 m long segments of Shinkansen track being placed.

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