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Old November 4th, 2013, 08:59 PM   #881
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A series of news reports from the Toyama area following the delivery of the first E7 series to JR East’s main Shinkansen facility in Rifu (Sendai). The front looks a bit like the 500 series.

KNB



FNN



Tulip TV



BBT

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Old November 4th, 2013, 09:01 PM   #882
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N700A unit F1 on the traverser at JR West’s Shinkansen facility in Hakata. This is the first N700A unit for JR West.

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Old November 5th, 2013, 12:59 PM   #883
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On the topic of punctuality (as the Shinkansen probably holds the world record in this), do HSR train drivers overspeed at times to make up for lost time? And if they do, how much of a margin do they have?
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Old November 5th, 2013, 08:38 PM   #884
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Turkey hopes to entice Japanese involvement in HSR plans
トルコ運輸相、高速鉄道整備で日本の参加促す

http://www.nikkei.com/article/DGXNAS...21C13A0FF1000/

In an interview with the Nikkei Shimbun, Turkish Minister of Transport Binali Yıldırım said he hopes to attract Japanese participation in the country’s high-speed rail plans. Turkey is currently constructing high-speed lines between Ankara and Instanbul and between Ankara and İzmir in western Turkey. A line between Ankara and Konya in central Turkey is already in service, and the eventual vision is to connect Turkey’s 15 largest cities, housing about half of the country’s population, with a high-speed network.

===

Marmaray Tunnel opening:



Taisei Corporation CM on the project:

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Old November 6th, 2013, 08:32 AM   #885
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Swordsman View Post
On the topic of punctuality (as the Shinkansen probably holds the world record in this), do HSR train drivers overspeed at times to make up for lost time?
No, they can't because the ATC would not allow them. The timetable is probably calculated for a slightly slower speed then they actually run (say 295 km/h instead of the 300 kmh/h allowed) to create a small buffer. However, knowing the Japanese they are trying to find a way to even reduce those bufers.
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Old November 6th, 2013, 09:29 AM   #886
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Yamagata Prefecture restarts lobbying efforts for Ōu, Uetsu Shinkansen
フル規格新幹線へ再始動 山形県、県民運動に着手

http://www.kahoku.co.jp/news/2013/10/20131028t51028.htm

Efforts in Yamagata Prefecture to realize the planned Ōu and Uetsu Shinkansen, full-standard Shinkansen lines between Fukushima and Akita (270 km) and between Toyama and Aomori (560 km) have restarted, 40 years after their inclusion in the 1973 Shinkansen master plan. There has been no real progress since the lines were first proposed, but the importance of a transport corridor along the Sea of Japan coast is getting some new thought following the Great East Japan Earthquake. With efforts to speed up the Tōhoku Shinkansen currently underway, Yamagata is concerned that it will be relegated to obscurity due to its remote location. Lobbying efforts by the Prefectural Government were suspended in 2005, but were restarted last year.

The Fukushima – Yamagata section of the planned line opened in 1992 with “mini” Shinkansen technology, but the suspension of Tōhoku Shinkansen services for a month and a half following the 2011 earthquake has confirmed, at least for supporters, the need for an alternative transport corridor along the Sea of Japan coast. The seven lines approved before adoption of the 1973 master plan—Tōkaidō, San’yō, Tōhoku, Jōetsu, Hokkaidō, Hokuriku, and Kyūshū—have already been completed or are under construction. The 1973 plan later added more lines, including the Ōu, Uetsu, Cross-Chugoku, Shikoku, and East Kyūshū routes. With work set to begin in FY2014 on the Chūō Shinkansen in preparation for a 2027 opening, the Prefectural Government believes the time is right to restart grassroots efforts for the Ōu and Uetsu Shinkansen.

In particular, the Prefectural Government is concerned that travel times to Yamagata are not competitive, with the fastest services between Yamagata and Shinjō (approx. 421 km) taking 3h 11m, longer than the 2h 59m fastest time for the 714 km between Tōkyō and Shin-Aomori. Introduction of the E6 onto the Akita Shinkansen, JR East’s other “mini” Shinkansen, has also reduced travel times between Tōkyō and Akita (approx. 663 km) to 3h 45 m.

===

I’m extremely doubtful we’ll ever see these built… Putting some new E6s on the Yamagata Shinkansen seems like a much more realistic improvement.

Yamagata Shinkansen clips:


Is this a high speed train with a road crossing? I thought Shinkansen were all grade separated.
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Old November 6th, 2013, 11:26 AM   #887
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Mini Shinkansen, where normal lines have been converted to standard gauge and the trains are limited to 130 km/hr. They run at 300ish up to Morioka and then split off onto the normal lines
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Old November 11th, 2013, 08:40 PM   #888
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E6:
Source: kimuchi583, on Flickr

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Old November 11th, 2013, 08:42 PM   #889
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image hosted on flickr


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Old November 12th, 2013, 06:55 AM   #890
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
A news feature on the N700A:


I must be spending too much time on the net, cause i seem to find this still picture rather mirth inducing...is that a train in your pocket...
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Old November 12th, 2013, 08:03 PM   #891
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Issue No. 44 (Summer 2013) of the JR East Technical Review has an interesting article on the ongoing research into wayside noise mitigation (地上側環境対策) as part of the future speed upgrade of the Tōhoku Shinkansen from the current 320 km/h to 360 km/h:
http://www.jreast.co.jp/development/...h-44-73-76.pdf

As stated before, 360 km/h is the long-term goal for the line, which will make rail more competitive on the longer-distance markets captured with the Hokkaidō Shinkansen. Development of the Fastech prototype unit was part of the initial research efforts, the fruits of which have already been incorporated into the E5 series, the new workhorse of the Tōhoku Shinkansen. However, they determined that an initial phased speed-up to 300 km/h and then 320 km/h was best, so they have yet to accomplish their full vision to operate revenue trains at 360 km/h.

This article describes some of their research programs to achieve that goal. They haven’t released the English-language version of this issue, but here’s a few key points translated / summarized.

Quote:
研究開発センターでは、「グループ経営構想Ⅴ~限りなき前進~」にも掲げられている新幹線の360㎞/hでの営業運転の実現に向けた研究開発を行っている。現在は東北新幹線において、時速320㎞/h運転区間のさらなる拡大に向けた課題の抽出と対策案の検討を行っている。

新幹線高速化に伴う環境対策としては、車両設備と地上設備の2点があげられるが、本稿では、地上設備の対策であるトンネル微気圧波と沿線騒音についての研究開発概要を報告する。
Quote:
At the (JR East) Research and Development Center, we are carrying out R&D efforts towards realizing Shinkansen revenue operations at 360 km/h, one of the goals in our Group Business Vision V: Unlimited Progress. Currently, we are identifying potential issues with expanding the amount of 320 km/h rated track on the Tōhoku Shinkansen, as well as investigating potential countermeasures.

With regards to environmental mitigation measures as part of a speed-up of the Shinkansen, there are two general strategies—rolling stock provisions and wayside provisions—but this document will summarize our R&D efforts on wayside mitigation measures—namely, tunnel micropressure waves and trackside noise.
With regards to tunnel micropressure waves (トンネル微気圧波), JR East is focusing on three countermeasures:
  • Preventing the creation of large pressure gradients (wave creation mitigation)
  • Not increasing the pressure gradient inside the tunnels (wave propagation mitigation)
  • Minimizing the energy released at the tunnel exit (wave emission mitigation)
Wave creation mitigation (突入対策)
For wave creation mitigation, JR East is focusing on installation of noise hoods with ducts at tunnel entrances (ダクト付きトンネル緩衝工), which smooth the initial pressure wave created when a Shinkansen train enters the tunnel at high speed. While extension of existing non-ducted noise hoods is one potential strategy to mitigate noise impacts with a speed increase to 360 km/h, the hoods become less effective at reducing the micropressure waves after reaching a certain length. There are also cost-related issues, as extension of the noise hoods requires relocation of existing wayside equipment, and can only be completed at night, when trains are not in service. To solve this, JR East modified the design of existing noise hoods to incorporate ducts, and after testing with laboratory scale models concluded that the design was effective at hood lengths of up to 40 m, successfully modified tunnel portals at 7 locations on the Ōmiya – Morioka section of the Tōhoku Shinkansen. The next goal is to implement the design on noise hoods longer than 40 m, starting first with laboratory model tests and eventually moving to field tests on actual tunnels.

Wave propagation mitigation (伝播対策)
For locations such as viaducts where localized conditions make it difficult to fully mitigate the noise at just the tunnel portals, wave propagation mitigation, which reduces the pressure gradient inside the tunnel and minimizes the micropressure waves, can be a complementary strategy. Installation of acoustic tubes (音響管) inside the tunnel, with openings facing approaching trains, are effective at reducing the pressure gradient by forcing the pressure wave to split into two and altering how the wave propagates through the tunnel over time. In order to be effective, however, the tubes must be sufficiently long, and while their effectiveness at reducing micropressure waves increases the greater the cross-sectional area of the tube or the greater the total distance of the tube installation, architectural / structural limitations and maintenance issues need to be fully investigated and resolved before the system can be implemented in real-world applications.

As an alternative solution for wave propagation mitigation, JR East is considering use of track ballast (バラスト散布) on slab track (スラブ軌道) sections. Unlike ballast track, slab track produces a steeper pressure gradient. While the pressure gradient later declines after about 8 km of tunnel, many of JR East’s Shinkansen tunnels are in the 3 km to 4 km range, resulting in large micropressure waves at the tunnel exit. Meanwhile, tests by the Railway Technical Research Institute (鉄道総研) have confirmed that ballast track tunnels are more effective at reducing tunnel micropressure waves, smoothing out the wavefront and reducing the wavefront pressure gradient. Between FY2013 and FY2014, JR East will conduct field tests, placing netted ballast bags in various parts of the slab track on 3,330 m of tunnel on the line, including inside the slab sections between the rails (枠型スラブ内), adjacent to the tunnel walls (トンネル側壁部下部), and near the center emergency passage (中央通路段差部).

Wave emission mitigation (放射対策)
The strength of the micropressure wave at the tunnel exit decreases the smaller the tunnel diameter. To mitigate wave emission at the tunnel exit, the RTRI has, therefore, proposed a new design of noise hood that incorporates an inner partition (内壁付きトンネル緩衝工). The inner partition minimizes the diameter of the tunnel exit while also forcing the micropressure wave to split into two, similar to acoustic tubes inside the tunnel. JR East is now investigating how to incorporate this design into existing tunnel noise hoods, as well as evaluating the cost effectiveness of the measure.

Other mitigation
Additional noise mitigation strategies are used on open sections of track to meet the Shinkansen noise thresholds of 70 dB for residential areas and 75 dB for other areas. The E5 series Shinkansen, the new flagship series of the Tōhoku Shinkansen, combats the increased noise impacts of 320 km/h running by incorporating highly-effective noise mitigation design elements that keep noise levels below the E2 series, even when running at higher speeds. However, a further increase to 360 km/h will require lineside mitigation (沿線騒音対策) at some locations in order to meet the noise thresholds, using construction methods that are cheaper than current methods.

The simplest noise mitigation measure is increasing the height of sound walls (防音壁嵩上げ) along the Shinkansen viaduct by installing concrete or transparent polycarbonate panels to the top of the existing sound wall. A 1 m increase in sound wall height was observed to reduce the noise level measured 25 m from track center and 1.2 m from ground level by 2 dB. Additional increases in sound wall height, however, are limited due to the ability of the viaduct to support the added weight, as well as interference with electrical systems. As a result, the focus is on increasing the effectiveness of sound wall mitigation while keeping the sound wall height increase to a minimum.

In particular, JR East worked with equipment manufacturers to develop special noise mitigation devices (騒音低減装置) that eliminate the need for land acquisition outside of the width of the Shinkansen viaduct. Called NIDES, the devices employ principles of sound diffraction and interference (多重回折・干渉) and improve upon previous designs, which required an additional 800 mm of space outside the exterior width of the viaduct. The new devices are contained entirely within the right-of-way and are capable of reducing the measured noise level by 2 dB independently, or 5 dB when used in tandem with a 1 m increase in sound wall height. The devices have been successfully used on 1.3 km of reinforced concrete sound wall, but have yet to be tested on “reverse-L” (逆L型構造) sound walls or H-column + panel steel-reinforced concrete sound walls. JR East will work on investigating how NIDES can be applied to these other sound wall designs, including the installation method, constructability, resilience, and cost.

Research by the RTRI also indicated that a Y-shaped sound wall (Y型防音壁) was the ideal sound wall design for reducing Shinkansen-generated noise. This design has already proven very successful in various shapes and styles for reducing traffic noise on roadways. Unlike roads, the Shinkansen has multiple sources of noise including the bogies (台車) and pantographs (パンタグラフ), but laboratory model tests indicated that this sound wall design has high potential to reduce Shinkansen noise. Although the design does extend beyond the current width of Shinkansen viaducts, requiring land acquisition and negotiations, it is an effective solution for locations where the ROW has already been secured, including cut or fill sections (盛土・切土区間) or areas near tunnel portals. JR East is currently investigating the ideal diameter and angle, separation distance from track, and height. While this is a cheaper solution than NIDES, additional research is needed regarding potential impacts from snowfall.

A separate solution involves an additional short (1.5 m) sound wall installed immediately adjacent to the rails (レール近接位置低防音壁), preventing the propagation of noise generated by Shinkansen bogies. This design has already proven successful on low-speed private-railway zairaisen tracks, and while scale models indicate that it is effective in reducing noise, additional research is needed with regards to effectiveness against wind pressure, as well as the impacts to snow accumulation capacity (貯雪容量) and to regular track maintenance (the sound walls obstruct visual inspection of the rails).
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Old November 13th, 2013, 02:05 AM   #892
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Quote:
A separate solution involves an additional short (1.5 m) sound wall installed immediately adjacent to the rails (レール近接位置低防音壁), preventing the propagation of noise generated by Shinkansen bogies. This design has already proven successful on low-speed private-railway zairaisen tracks
I've seen these installations on Tokyu Railway tracks, namely the quad track sections of the Den'en Toshi/Oimachi Line, and I believe the Toyoko Line. Tokyu has some interesting and innovative setups in their recent construction and line upgrades.
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Old November 13th, 2013, 04:40 AM   #893
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Folks, if you still want to ride the E3 trainset on the Akita Shinkansen, do it soon. It appears JR East are rapidly retiring the original E3 trainsets built in the late 1990's, and they could be gone by the beginning of Fiscal 2014 (March 2014). Of course, the E3's built for the Yamagata Shinkansen may operate until at least 2022, since the E3's on the Yamagata Shinkansen only run at full speed between Omiya and Fukushima Stations.
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Old November 13th, 2013, 06:41 AM   #894
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Speaking of E3s:

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Old November 13th, 2013, 08:11 AM   #895
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JR West and JR East have announced that they will unveil the new E7 / W7 series to the press on 2013.11.28. The first E7 set is currently undergoing inspections and running tests at JR East’s Shinkansen facility in Rifu.

News report. This video also has some clips of the construction work at Kurobe – Unazuki Onsen Station, which is now 85% complete. They’ve already completed most of the necessary work to permit testing with JR East’s East-i unit in December.

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Old November 13th, 2013, 03:15 PM   #896
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Speaking of E3s:

Those are the oldest E3's being scrapped, all built in the late 1990's for the opening of the Akita Shinkansen service. They were built at the same time as E2 trainsets fitted with special couplers so the E2/E3 trainsets could run together at 275 km/h. I believe 19 of the 26 trainsets from that batch are being scrapped, but the last production models from that batch may stay around for a while, maybe even transferred to Yamagata Shinkansen service, in my opinion.
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Old November 18th, 2013, 12:31 PM   #897
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The first E7 unit entering the inspection facility inside at Rifu (2013.11.17):

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Old November 19th, 2013, 02:28 PM   #898
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<Snip>
Confirmation that yes, train porn exists.
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Old November 20th, 2013, 01:15 AM   #899
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Boring work completed for Nagasaki Shinkansen’s Enogushi Tunnel
江ノ串トンネル 130人が貫通祝う 新幹線西九州ルート

http://www.nishinippon.co.jp/nnp/nagasaki/article/52018

Boring of the 1,351 m Enogushi Tunnel (江ノ串トンネル) on the Kyūshū Shinkansen’s West Kyūshū (Nagasaki) route scheduled to open in FY2022 has been completed, and a commemorative ceremony was held on 2013.11.12.

The tunnel is located between the future Shin-Ōmura (新大村) and Ureshino Onsen (嬉野温泉) Stations on the Shinkansen, at a location straddling Ōmura (大村) City and Higashi-Sonogi (東彼杵) Town. Work on constructing the tunnel began in July 2011, and this is the sixth Shinkansen tunnel to be completed in Nagasaki Prefecture. It’s also the second of 8 Shinkansen tunnels to be completed in Ōmura City.

===

Pictures:
http://www.city.omura.nagasaki.jp/sh...usikantuu.html











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Old November 20th, 2013, 08:55 AM   #900
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One question I've always wondered: How does the ride of a mini-Shinkansen compare with a normal Shinkansen. The width shouldn't be an issue, but the shorter carriages may.
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