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Old December 1st, 2013, 08:31 AM   #921
quashlo
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Some more Hokuriku Shinkansen videos... It looks like we have at least one YouTube user (maybe more) who is doing a solid job tracking all the video reports from the news stations in the Hokuriku region. These are especially valuable, as they contain a lot of behind-the-scenes footage at construction sites and manufacturers’ plants that you would probably never get to see.

First, a mixed bag of news from a couple weeks ago that I had missed, including installation of a “countdown” board at Toyama Station to raise public awareness of the upcoming opening. More interesting is the rest of the video, which includes tours of the various construction sites in Toyama Prefecture. Included is the slab track construction, which involves using rail cranes to lifts and place pre-fabricated sections of slab and then fine-tuning the placement, height, and angle to millimeter-level tolerance using measurement devices. There are a total of 36,684 such slab sections in Toyama Prefecture alone. Next is the creation of the continuously-welded rail with the welding machine, which takes 25 m segments and welds them to form 200 m segments, and then joins those into much larger segments of several (or several tens of) km. Next segment follows the catenary and overhead installation, performed by a team of workers deployed on three workcars. The overhead must be perfectly level, and they are aiming to finish the work before the snow season starts. There’s a small bit about the frequency change between eastern and western Japan, something unique to Japan and the Hokuriku Shinkansen (the frequency on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen was designed to be a constant 60 Hz, so doesn’t really have to deal with this). In the event of substation failure, they also incorporated new technology to allow them to divert power from other substations not at the same frequency.



A video report touring the local glass maker in Toyama responsible for the cab windshield of the E7 / W7 series. Apparently, they’ve produced windshields for other Shinkansen sets, so they have experience in this area. First step is building the metal mold, which is handled by a 25-year veteran at the company and takes 3 weeks to assemble (looks like they censored some of the scene, probably a company secret?). For glass shaping, they lay 4 sheets of glass on top of each other, but as the E7 / W7 windshield features a large central section, they had to use their thickest sheets. The glass is placed inside the furnace and gradually heated to around 600°C over the course of 6 hours. When the team of workers arrived the next morning after the glass had cooled and set, they performed some inspection and found a “mismatch” (a section that did not bend properly), leaving a 1 mm gap in between sheets. The work cannot be salvaged and they have to start with fresh sheets. Over the course of the next 120 days, the team tweaked the design process, including the furnace temperature and shape of the mold, until they perfected it and deemed it suitable for mass production. The molded sheets are then delivered to the railcar manufacturer (in this case, Kawasaki) for special treatment. The report moves to the Kawasaki plant in Kōbe to discuss the design of the E7 / W7, where the Kawasaki designer says that the size of the windshield was a key aesthetic point for the design, given that the train would not need to be running at 320 km/h like the E5 or E6. Next, they begin installing the sections of the windshield into the cab car. Next are live interviews at the glass plant with the top members of the windshield team. The biggest hurdles in this particular contract are the size of the windshield (standard windshield design on Shinkansen sets is to break up the front into three sections, but the E7 / W7 has a large, single piece of glass) and getting the curvature correct (optimizing the localized temperature inside the furnace to bend the glass in the correct angles).

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Old December 1st, 2013, 08:00 PM   #922
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E2 tests on Hokuriku Shinkansen to begin on 2013.12.06
北陸新幹線:開業に向け、「E2系」車両の走行試験 来月6日から

http://mainichi.jp/feature/news/2013...40030000c.html

Testing with E2 series revenue vehicles, normally used on the Tōhoku Shinkansen’s Yamabiko services, on the Nagano – Kurobe–Unazuki Onsen section of the Hokuriku Shinkansen extension scheduled to open in spring 2015 will begin on 2013.12.06, marking a new milestone in the construction of the project.

The tests will be carried out jointly by JR West, JR East, and the construction lead on the company, the Japan Railway Construction, Transport and Technology Agency (JRTT). According to the JRTT’s Hokuriku Shinkansen Construction Bureau, the E2 series test train will depart Nagano at around 1:00 am, making intermediate stops at stations along the way, including Jōetsu–Myōkō (Jōetsu City) and Itoigawa Stations. The tests are designed to confirm the functionality of the line’s automatic train control (ATC) system. The train will arrive at Jōetsu–Myōkō at 3:00 am, followed by Itoigawa at 5:00 am.

The first train tests will actually be performed on 2013.12.02, but these will use JR East’s all-purpose test train, the East-i. Those tests will determine the adequacy of the catenary / overhead systems, tracks, and other infrastructure. In addition to confirming the performance of the ATC system, the E2 series testing to start on 2013.12.06 will also allow JRTT and the railways to confirm the line’s safety and stability, with the train running at speeds up to 260 km/h. The running tests will last until 2013.03.28. Tests on the latter half of the extension, from Kurobe–Unazuki Onsen to Kanazawa, will begin in April of next year.

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Old December 1st, 2013, 11:32 PM   #923
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Hopefully, YouTube member whitewing681--who lives in the Toyoma area just west of Kurobe-Unazuki Onsen Station and has documented a lot of train action in the Toyoma area on YouTube--will record a video of the E926 East-i trainset arriving at the station on 2 December 2013.

EDIT: here's the first news videos of the E926 trainset leaving Nagano Station to run down the new line:

FNN:



ANN:


Last edited by sacto7654; December 2nd, 2013 at 03:12 PM. Reason: add new information
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Old December 2nd, 2013, 06:41 AM   #924
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Some more Hokuriku Shinkansen videos...

...There’s a small bit about the frequency change between eastern and western Japan, something unique to Japan and the Hokuriku Shinkansen (the frequency on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen was designed to be a constant 60 Hz, so doesn’t really have to deal with this). In the event of substation failure, they also incorporated new technology to allow them to divert power from other substations not at the same frequency...

Interesting!

I do remember asking a question on this forum once about the disconnect between the Tokaido Shinkansen and the Tohoku Shinkansen at Tokyo Station. It seems that Hokuriku Shinkansen will be the first time that Shinkansen trains will have to adapt to a change in frequency.

Maybe (just maybe) one day one could see trains running from Kagoshima-Chuo all the way to Sapporo. Of course, this will just be for the kicks
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Old December 2nd, 2013, 09:33 AM   #925
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Quote:
It seems that Hokuriku Shinkansen will be the first time that Shinkansen trains will have to adapt to a change in frequency.
Or rather it's the first time change in frequency has to be encountered more than once in a service run end-to-end. There is a section in Niigata Prefecture that is 50Hz, that is sandwiched between 60hz sections.

http://bunken.rtri.or.jp/PDF/cdroms1...0001003120.pdf
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Old December 2nd, 2013, 01:39 PM   #926
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Changing frequency is no different from changing voltage or from AC to DC. It's done in Japan and the rest of the world thousands of times a day. What is special is that in case of malfunction in a section it can be powered by an adjacent section with a different frequency. That's a first as far as I know.
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Old December 2nd, 2013, 02:25 PM   #927
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Quote:
A video report touring the local glass maker in Toyama responsible for the cab windshield of the E7 / W7 series.
Excellent report, something that shows the importance of small/medium size firms in the supply chain for railway rolling stock. Though the big firms like KHI or Nippon Sharyo get all the notice and publicity, it's these companies working behind the scenes that help with the little improvements that make for better products. Also, this segment is actually a preview of a longer TBS program profiling this company's efforts with this project. One thing about Japanese television is that there are many excellent documentaries like this, something I doubt you will see in other countries' media (who would profile a railway component maker, other than in Japan?), a fact that is completely lost on the clueless (monolingual Anglophone) expats living in Japan that regularly disparage Japanese television for being just "cooking programs and variety game shows".
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Old December 3rd, 2013, 02:09 AM   #928
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YouTube member whitewing681 has posted the following videos of the first run of a Shinkansen trainset on the Hokuriku line past Nagano Station:

At Jōetsumyōkō Station:



At Itoigawa Station:



At Kurobe-Unazukionsen Station:



Note the celebratory fireworks as the E926 East-i trainset enters the station in the last video.
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Old December 3rd, 2013, 07:29 PM   #929
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New Shizuoka Airport Station could meet special, Olympic demand
「臨時駅構想」提案へ 静岡空港・新幹線新駅

http://www.chunichi.co.jp/article/sh...302000085.html

In an interview with Chūnichi Shimbun, top officials with Shizuoka Prefecture revealed that they are considering establishing their proposed Shizuoka Airport Station on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen as a special station to meet demand during the 2020 Olympic Games and other special situations. Prefectural officials will submit their proposal to JR Central soon.

According to sources close to the project, the Prefectural Government’s plan would operate the station only under special cases, such as during the expected increase in flights at the airport before and after the 2020 Olympic Games, or when natural disasters or other emergency situations disrupt travel at airports in Greater Tōkyō. The station would begin permanent operations after the Chūō Shinkansen maglev opens to Nagoya, with a handful of trains each hour stopping at the station. Shizuoka Prefecture would shoulder the full construction cost of the station, estimated at several tens of billions of yen.

The governor of Shizuoka Prefecture has proposed the new station as a means of enhancing the airport’s functionality, but JR Central has expressed some opposition. The governor was quoted as saying that he had already broached the concept with the MLIT minister, who said he would begin considering it. Meanwhile, JR Central spokespersons continued to express their opposition to the plan, saying construction of a new underground station beneath a functioning airport is “impossible”.

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Old December 4th, 2013, 07:28 PM   #930
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E3 series unit R24 was hauled from Akita to Zushi from 2013.12.01 to 2013.12.02, presumably to undergo refurbishment at the J-TREC facility in Yokohama in preparation to be shifted to another line (probably the Yamagata Shinkansen). As we already know, the E3s will disappear completely from the Akita Shinkansen with the March 2014 schedule changes, but JR East hasn’t given any official word on what will happen to those trainsets. The trainset traveled via the Uetsu, Jōetsu, and Takasaki Lines.

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Old December 4th, 2013, 07:30 PM   #931
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E7 arrival and departure at Sendai (2013.11.28):



Arrival of Cars 7-12 of the second E7 set, F2, at the Port of Sendai (2013.12.03). The first half appears to have already been trucked to Rifu.

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Old December 4th, 2013, 07:32 PM   #932
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Special 20-minute feature produced by Iiyama City documenting the arrival of the East-i test set at Iiyama Station. I will definitely be doing a marathon tour of the Hokuriku region once the extension opens.



HAB news report that summarizes all the events up and down the extension from a couple days ago:

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Old December 4th, 2013, 07:33 PM   #933
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Clips on the Tōhoku Shinkansen in late November and early December. In a few years, this should be all E5s and E6s, as the E5s begin to take on more and more of the slower services (Hayate and Yamabiko). This series also has a several clips of E6 unit S12 on test runs.

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Old December 4th, 2013, 09:57 PM   #934
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I suppose the second-last car around minute 0:40 is a special car to test infrastructure, is this correct? It is curious. As far I know only in France it is possible to see a test car inside a standard high speed trains, but it is case, it is placed between the locomotive and passenger coaches, not between passenger coaches.
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Old December 4th, 2013, 10:23 PM   #935
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I suppose the second-last car around minute 0:40 is a special car to test infrastructure, is this correct? It is curious. As far I know only in France it is possible to see a test car inside a standard high speed trains, but it is case, it is placed between the locomotive and passenger coaches, not between passenger coaches.
Yup. It looks like a car from the East-i.

I have few questions:

1) Why withdraw the double-deckers without replacement? It seems to be a reduction in capacity?

2) If the Tokaido Shinkansen is at capacity, why not introduce double-deck trains there?

3) Is it possible to have the various different combinations of the trains on the Tokaido line run coupled if they adhere to the slower train's rate of acceleration (I seem to recall seeing an E5/E3 lash-up somewhere, so it stands to reason that they could have an E5/E2 lash-up)?

4) If more capacity is needed, might they double-up pairs of E5s? Or will they make a new, longer, train?
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Old December 4th, 2013, 11:59 PM   #936
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Don't know answers for other questions but I might know this one:
Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
2) If the Tokaido Shinkansen is at capacity, why not introduce double-deck trains there?
I believe that tunnels, built in early 1960s, don't have necessary clearance which also limits highest speed to 270 km/h.
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Old December 5th, 2013, 02:29 AM   #937
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Quote:
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2) If the Tokaido Shinkansen is at capacity, why not introduce double-deck trains there?
Well, JNR/JR Central did run a kind of double decker train with these cars on the Tokaido and San'yo Shinkansen lines:



These are the double-decker restaurant cars on the 100 Series Shinkansen. But in the end, JR Central just decided to buy 16-car single-level trainsets with the 300 and 700 Series instead.
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Old December 5th, 2013, 04:09 AM   #938
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Quote:
1) Why withdraw the double-deckers without replacement? It seems to be a reduction in capacity?
The doubledeckers are not particularly popular with (regular) passengers. They are also lower performance than single level rolling stock and have greater station dwell times. Better to have more frequent service than run fewer trains with greater individual passenger capacity. This is a fundamental difference in operating practices between Japan (as well as Britain) and European Continental railways.

Quote:
2) If the Tokaido Shinkansen is at capacity, why not introduce double-deck trains there?
JR Tokai is committed to running 16 car single level trains (eventually all N700), which fit their operating practices of high frequency, low dwell times. And JR Tokai is going to increase capacity on their operating corridor- it's called the Chuo Shinkansen Maglev.

Quote:
3) Is it possible to have the various different combinations of the trains on the Tokaido line run coupled if they adhere to the slower train's rate of acceleration (I seem to recall seeing an E5/E3 lash-up somewhere, so it stands to reason that they could have an E5/E2 lash-up)?
JR Tokai is aiming for only one type of trainset running on their route (the N700)- standardization saves on costs and is efficiency optimal. Slower trains do not belong on the Tokaido Shinkansen- everything needs to accelerate at a high rate (as well as brake).
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Old December 5th, 2013, 04:42 AM   #939
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Quote:
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Don't know answers for other questions but I might know this one:

I believe that tunnels, built in early 1960s, don't have necessary clearance which also limits highest speed to 270 km/h.
Ah, so THERE's the prototype penalty.

Is it just the tunnels, or is it also the curves limiting speed? What other factors are there?

Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
The doubledeckers are not particularly popular with (regular) passengers. They are also lower performance than single level rolling stock and have greater station dwell times. Better to have more frequent service than run fewer trains with greater individual passenger capacity. This is a fundamental difference in operating practices between Japan (as well as Britain) and European Continental railways.


JR Tokai is committed to running 16 car single level trains (eventually all N700), which fit their operating practices of high frequency, low dwell times. And JR Tokai is going to increase capacity on their operating corridor- it's called the Chuo Shinkansen Maglev.
Thanks. So I guess they're not going to be adding extra tracks and making the Tokaido quad-track, then?

Quote:
JR Tokai is aiming for only one type of trainset running on their route (the N700)- standardization saves on costs and is efficiency optimal. Slower trains do not belong on the Tokaido Shinkansen- everything needs to accelerate at a high rate (as well as brake).
Whoops. Meant Tohoku Shinkansen (also Joetsu).

Are there any E2/E2 formations? What about E5/E5?

Are there plans (longer term) for putting E5s on the Joetsu line? Will they ever use the Hokoriku? Will E7/W7 ever run on the Joetsu (I figure that their slower speeds will keep them off of the Tohoku)?
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Old December 5th, 2013, 04:43 AM   #940
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Damn, Tokaido, you scary.



I've heard that the Beijing-Shanghai HSR recently surpassed Tokaido in highest daily ridership. Is Jinghu HSR aiming for (in need of) the same level of discipline as Tokaido, or is it because simply Jinghu is longer and thus has more passengers spread out in-between?
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