daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Railways

Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old December 5th, 2013, 07:01 AM   #941
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Swordsman View Post
I've heard that the Beijing-Shanghai HSR recently surpassed Tokaido in highest daily ridership.
Your source is probably wrong, although feel free to post it, if you have it.

Average daily ridership on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen for FY2012 was 409,000, or 149 million annually.
http://english.jr-central.co.jp/comp...report2013.pdf

This only gives an annual figure of 53.34 million in first year and 74.40 million in second year for Jinghu.
http://news.carnoc.com/list/255/255341.html

Anyways, it doesn't really make sense to compare Beijing ‒ Shanghai (1,300 km) with Tōkyō ‒ Ōsaka (515 km)... The only similarity is that they are anchored by two large cities. The distances (and travel times) are not really comparable.

On a pure distance basis (not saying this is a good way to compare them, either), Tōkyō ‒ Hakata (1,070 km) or Tōkyō ‒ Kagoshima Chūō (1,330 km) are better matches than Tōkyō ‒ Ōsaka, in which case you would need to add in some portion of 65 million annually for the San'yō Shinkansen and the 9.09 million (Hakata – Kumamoto) and 4.99 million (Kumamoto – Kagoshima Chūō) for the Kyūshū Shinkansen.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō

k.k.jetcar liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old December 5th, 2013, 07:34 AM   #942
k.k.jetcar
Registered User
 
k.k.jetcar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Sapporo
Posts: 1,812
Likes (Received): 452

To add to quashlo's point about HSR service distances, most customers (over 90%, IIRC) who need to get from Tokyo to Hakata fly*. I reckon even fewer "rail it" from Tokyo to Southern Kyushu. Those distances are past the HSR travel time "sweet spot".

*Flying in Japan is still relatively pleasant if pricey, without the invasive security theater of the U.S. and the horrendous delays of Chinese air carriers.
k.k.jetcar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 5th, 2013, 10:21 PM   #943
M-NL
Mixed-mode traveller
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 1,158
Likes (Received): 274

Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
Are there any E2/E2 formations? What about E5/E5?

Are there plans (longer term) for putting E5s on the Joetsu line? Will they ever use the Hokoriku? Will E7/W7 ever run on the Joetsu (I figure that their slower speeds will keep them off of the Tohoku)?
I've never seen an E2/E2 combo, but it might be possible to couple 2 8-car E2 sets. As the coupler used seems pretty universal to me I suppose all types could couple with each other. However, most E2/E2 combinations and a E5/E5 combo would be 20 cars and not fit into the existing stations.

E5 can't run on the Hokuriku for 2 reasons: First, it's geared for speed, not for the steep slopes of the Hokuriku line (yes, the weird conclusion is that an E5 would be to slow for the Hokuriku, while an E7 would be to slow for the Joetsu) and second, the E5 is 25 kV 50 Hz only, with part of the Hokuriku having 25 kV 60 Hz.
__________________
Public transport: Mode of transport that takes to much time to take you from the place you're not currently located, to the place you didn't want to go to, at a time that doesn't really suit you.
M-NL no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 6th, 2013, 09:24 AM   #944
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

E2 series Unit J5 begins testing on the Hokuriku Shinkansen (2013.12.06). This is the first time a trainset used in regular revenue service traversed portions of the line, just a few days after testing with the East-i.

__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō

Equario liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 6th, 2013, 09:27 AM   #945
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Japanese airlines facing threat from below
http://asia.nikkei.com/Business/Tren...eat-from-below

Quote:
TOKYO (Nikkei) -- For major Japanese carriers vying for international routes, solidifying operations on the homefront is crucial. Yet they face an increasingly formidable competitor in ever-evolving shinkansen bullet trains.

Tadao Nishio, a Japan Airlines executive officer in charge of domestic route marketing, was taken aback by how comfortable his ride had been on a recent bullet train trip. The train did not seem to shake sideways like it used to. "This is a problem," Nishio said with a sense of dread. Smooth shinkansen trips mean fewer passengers for JAL. Nozomi services between Osaka and Tokyo have increased following the expansion of Shin-Oasaka Station in March. With the switch to more comfortable trains, the threat to airlines is growing.

The Ministry of Transportation formed a committee on Nov. 1 to discuss increasing the number of landing and departure slots at greater Tokyo airports. "Nothing will be considered a sacred cow in our discussions," says Hitoshi Ieda, a University of Tokyo professor who chairs the panel. One of the items on the committee's packed agenda is converting some landing slots at Haneda from domestic to international routes, a proposal that seeks to accommodate more international flights without a costly expansion. With shinkansen networks extending their reach to most regions of Japan, including Kyushu, Hokuriku and Hokkaido, critics contend that Haneda is serving more domestic flights than necessary.

3-hour barrier

Japanese carriers have steadily lost ground to shinkansen in recent years. In 2003, a shinkansen stop opened in Tokyo's Shinagawa, and Nozomi service increased sharply. Six out of 10 travelers on the Tokyo-Hiroshima line used to fly the route, but now the ratio has reversed in favor of the bullet train. One theory is that travelers choose shinkansen if the trip takes less than three hours. This past March, Tohoku Shinkansen revved up its speed, reducing the travel time between Tokyo and Shin-Aomori to just under three hours -- two hours and 59 minutes at the shortest.

Meanwhile, JAL was forced to use smaller aircraft on Haneda-Aomori flights starting in October. Its revenue from domestic routes in fiscal 2012 came to just around 70% of the peak in fiscal 2006, or about 200 billion yen ($1.97 billion) lower. The drop was blamed on service cuts following the carrier's bankruptcy, as well as shinkansen siphoning away customers.
===

Thanks to ukiyo for this find... There's a lot of gloom-and-doom articles about the future fortunes of the Shinkansen against the LCC boom, so this one offers a bit more perspective from the other side.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō

Equario liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 6th, 2013, 03:31 PM   #946
sacto7654
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Sacramento
Posts: 796
Likes (Received): 283

Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
To add to quashlo's point about HSR service distances, most customers (over 90%, IIRC) who need to get from Tokyo to Hakata fly*. I reckon even fewer "rail it" from Tokyo to Southern Kyushu. Those distances are past the HSR travel time "sweet spot".
That's because a one-way trip on Nozomi from Tokyo to Hakata is around five hours, and (for Japan Rail Pass holders) a combined trip on Hikari from Tokyo to Shin-Osaka and Sakura from Shin-Osaka to Hakata is nearly seven hours! Lot faster to take a plane from Haneda to Fukuoka airports.

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Thanks to ukiyo for this find... There's a lot of gloom-and-doom articles about the future fortunes of the Shinkansen against the LCC boom, so this one offers a bit more perspective from the other side.
Yet Shinkansen continue to do well because you don't need to deal with the hassle taking transportation to an from the airport, since most Shinkansen stations are close to the city center. And thanks to improved technology, today's N700, 800, E2, E3, E5 and E6 trainsets have vastly smoother rides than the old 0 and 200 Series trainsets that dominated the Shinkansen lines for a number of decades.
sacto7654 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 6th, 2013, 07:51 PM   #947
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Shin-Ōsaka Station upgrades to be completed in January
JR東海、新大阪駅の大規模改良工事が完了へ…災害時のダイヤ回復能力を強化


On 2013.12.04, JR Central announced that it will find the major upgrades to Shin-Ōsaka Station (Yodagawa Ward, Ōsaka City) on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen in January 2014. The station originally featured 4 platforms (3 island, 1 side) and 7 tracks, plus 2 sidings at the Shin-Kōbe end, but JR Central broke ground on a major upgrade of the station in 2007 designed to improve the railway’s ability to recover from service disruptions and facilitate expansion of the schedule with additional trains. The project involved adding an additional track and side platform on the north side of the station, and creating an additional two layover tracks at the west side of the station.

The upgrades used portions of land owned by Hankyū Corporation on the north side of the Shinkansen viaduct, originally secured as part of Hankyū’s proposed Shin-Ōsaka Connector from Jūsō (十三) to Awaji (淡路) via Shin-Ōsaka and from Shin-Ōsaka to Kanzakigawa (神崎川). Hankyū’s plans, with the exception of the Jūsō – Shin-Ōsaka section, were shelved in 2003, freeing up the land to be used by JR Central instead.

The new Platform 27 and No. 3 and No. 4 sidings at the station opened earlier this year on 2013.03.16, but the upgrades to the existing No. 1 and No. 2 sidings will be completed on 2014.01.26, returning to full use after testing.

Before:


After:


===

Official press release:
http://jr-central.co.jp/news/release/nws001341.html

The new Platform 27 that opened earlier this year:
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 6th, 2013, 08:59 PM   #948
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Don’t know how I missed this, but Japan California High Speed Rail Consortium produced some simple promo videos (in English, to boot). God-awful cheesy (they should have just gotten a professional reporter who can actually speak English to do it), and there are some glaring spelling / pronunciation mistakes, but it does include some interesting behind-the-scenes footage.

Manufacture of E5 + E6 at KHI Hyōgo:



Maintenance of E6 at Akita:



Boarding at Morioka, in-train amenities, and in-cab footage:

__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 7th, 2013, 05:11 AM   #949
Silver Swordsman
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 371
Likes (Received): 101

My eyes are happy, but my ears hurt.
__________________
My Virtual-Model Railroad: High Speed Rail in RCT3
Project Anniversary: Click Here

Simon91 liked this post
Silver Swordsman no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 7th, 2013, 05:28 AM   #950
k.k.jetcar
Registered User
 
k.k.jetcar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Sapporo
Posts: 1,812
Likes (Received): 452

Quote:
Japan California High Speed Rail Consortium produced some simple promo videos
Then again, why should they spend money for high production values on a project that is pretty much doomed?
k.k.jetcar no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 7th, 2013, 08:57 AM   #951
Silly_Walks
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 3,980
Likes (Received): 836

Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Swordsman View Post
My eyes are happy, but my ears hurt.
You just convinced me to watch the video... muted
__________________

Silver Swordsman liked this post
Silly_Walks no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 7th, 2013, 06:24 PM   #952
castermaild55
Registered User
 
castermaild55's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 4,215
Likes (Received): 3060

as for Hokuriku shinkansen , Can we see Sankyo village(散居村) from window in Tonami plain?

https://www.google.co.jp/search?q=%E...w=1366&bih=642
castermaild55 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 10th, 2013, 01:44 AM   #953
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Hm, not sure if the Shinkansen will be up high enough to really see it that well.
新幹線の高架橋は普通そんな高くないのであんまり見えないかも。
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 10th, 2013, 01:50 AM   #954
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

JR Central finalizes platform door program for Kyōto Station
JR東海、東海道新幹線京都駅にホームドア設置 - 2015年2月から順次使用開始

http://news.mynavi.jp/news/2013/12/06/235/

On 2013.12.04, JR Central announced that it had finalized the implementation program to install platform doors at Kyōto Station on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen. The program will encompass all four tracks (two island platforms) at the station, with the first installation beginning operations in February 2015 on Platform 12. Platforms 11, 13, and 14 will follow in that order, with the construction scheduled for completion in March 2016. The total cost is approx. ¥1.5 billion.

Platform doors are currently in operation on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen only at selected stations, and only at selected platforms( Platforms 14-16 at Tōkyō, Platforms 21 and 24 at Shinagawa, Platforms 2 and 3 at Yokohama, Platforms 6 and 7 at Atami, and Platform 27 at Shin-Ōsaka). Work is currently underway on installing doors for Platforms 17-19 at Tōkyō Station and Platforms 14-17 at Nagoya Station, with the former scheduled for completion before March 2015 and the latter before March 2017.

Platform doors on Platform 27 at Shin-Ōsaka:


===

Official press release:
http://jr-central.co.jp/news/release/nws001340.html=
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 10th, 2013, 02:00 AM   #955
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

First daytime E7 testing between Sendai and Kitakami, shot at Furukawa on 2013.12.09. According to the video info, the speed of the first train should be about 270 km/h, and they were doing testing of the acceleration and braking performance at Furukawa and Kurikoma Kōgen. Only a few months before we see them in service on the Nagano Shinkansen.

__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 10th, 2013, 02:01 AM   #956
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Some recent news reports:

The first E2 tests on the Hokuriku Shinkansen. According to a Mainichi Shimbun report, these specific tests were designed to confirm the functionality of the ATC systems, as well as stability and safety of high-speed running. Max speed in the tests was only 110 km/h, average was 60-70 km/h. Trains will begin testing at 260 km/h in early March.



Tourism efforts in Iiyama (Nagano Prefecture):

__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 10th, 2013, 07:40 AM   #957
dimlys1994
Moderator
 
dimlys1994's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Dniepropetrovsk
Posts: 16,356
Likes (Received): 26181

Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Platform doors on Platform 27 at Shin-Ōsaka:
A very beautiful screen doors, especially for railway station. I wonder how much in dollars did Japan spend on installation PSC?
dimlys1994 está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old December 10th, 2013, 08:58 PM   #958
quashlo
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 14,835
Likes (Received): 3215

Well, the cost for the Kyōto Station installation is ¥1.5 billion divided across 4 platforms, so about ¥375 million per platform, which sounds about right... Obviously, a Shinkansen platform is 400 m long, so it would be slightly cheaper for an urban transit / metro station.

The cost can be highly variable, though, and ultimately depends on a lot of other factors, probably the biggest being whether the platforms need to be structurally reinforced or rebuilt to support the added weight of the doors. At least in Japan's case, many of the platform doors outside of the Shinkansen stations are being installed are on legacy lines, with stations that were never designed with platform doors in mind, so they have to do a lot of work on the platform before they can even begin erecting the system.

Another factor is whether or not to introduce some form of ATO to help the train operator... Most legacy lines aren't ATO and require a human operator to be present to control braking of the train, which becomes particularly important given the precision and accuracy needed to stop the train at the correct position on the platform.
__________________
San Francisco
Japan 2013; Japan 2011
: Tōkyō I, II, III (Kamakura), IV (Yokohama), V; Ōsaka I (+Kyōto +Kōbe), II (Kyōto), III (Nara); Hiroshima; Fukuoka; Nagasaki; Kita-Kyushu + Shimonoseki; Nikkō

dimlys1994 liked this post
quashlo no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old December 10th, 2013, 10:44 PM   #959
dimlys1994
Moderator
 
dimlys1994's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Dniepropetrovsk
Posts: 16,356
Likes (Received): 26181

How tough, isn't it? Japan is perhaps the only railway in the world, which have PSDs on most stations in the populated cities.
dimlys1994 está en línea ahora   Reply With Quote
Old December 12th, 2013, 02:07 AM   #960
riles28
train
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2,161
Likes (Received): 38

While Hokuriko shinkansen taking shape ahead, any update for the Hokkaido shinkansen line what are the latest development on that.
riles28 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 06:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium