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Old January 8th, 2014, 10:06 PM   #1081
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Looks like E7 unit F1 resumed testing again... This is the first shot side-by-side with an N700 set.

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Old January 9th, 2014, 01:10 AM   #1082
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E6 clips from 2013.
In a little over 2 months, the Akita Shinkansen will be nothing but E6 series.

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Old January 9th, 2014, 05:12 AM   #1083
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EIS work underway for JR Central’s proposed Texas HSR
http://www.ketknbc.com/news/federal-...high-speed-rai

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SAN ANTONIO, TX — The federal government, Texas and a private company are collectively working on two studies to assess the impact of a high-speed rail line between Houston and Dallas, U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx confirmed Tuesday.

Foxx, speaking at the Texas Transportation Forum, an annual conference put on by the Texas Department of Transportation, said that the Federal Railroad Administration, TxDOT and Texas Central High-Speed Railway will move forward this year on environmental impact studies related to the project. The completion of such a study is typically a key early step in developing a major transportation project.

“I can’t speak to whether there will be roadblocks or anything down the road, but what I can tell you is I’m delighted to be part of helping get this first step underway,” Foxx said in an interview after his speech. “It’s a big deal for Texas, and we’ll see what happens going forward.”

In 2012, Texas Central High-Speed Railway announced plans to develop a high-speed rail line between Houston and Dallas entirely with private funding. Company officials said the project, which could reduce travel time between the two cities to less than 90 minutes, would use bullet train technology from a Japanese firm that already operates a profitable bullet train line in Japan. The firm is expected to release details of the proposed route for a Dallas-to-Houston line later this year. Company officials have expressed hope that the line could be up and running as soon as 2021.

TxDOT Executive Director Phil Wilson said that two separate environmental impact studies are in development. The Federal Railroad Administration and Texas Central High-Speed Railway will conduct a study of a high-speed rail line between Dallas and Houston. TxDOT, in partnership with the FRA, will sponsor a study of a slower rail line connecting Fort Worth, Arlington and Dallas.

“We, TxDOT, will sponsor the environmental impact study on the Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington side,” Wilson said. “The private sector will sponsor the EIS for that Houston/Dallas corridor.”

TxDOT officials could not provide a timeline for when either study would be completed.

While a private firm is developing the Houston-Dallas line, Wilson said that no state money is planned to build the shorter Fort Worth-Arlington-Dallas line. North Texas leaders have advocated for the latter project to ensure that the entire Dallas/Fort Worth region will be able to access a high-speed rail station in Dallas, if one is built. If the project moves forward, the affected communities would need to identify funding for that local line, Wilson said.
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Old January 9th, 2014, 03:26 PM   #1084
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A couple of comments:

1) Yes, the E3's will soon be gone from the Komachi train running on the Akita Shinkansen service. I believe they are among the oldest E3's built and these trainsets are reaching the end of their service lives, especially since they travel at full speed (275 km/h) a lot longer distance than the Yamagata Shinkansen trainsets. Those E3's will be scrapped and likely any salvageable parts will be used as spare parts for the remaining E3's. I also expect the remaining E3's to be heavily refurbished with totally new interiors and given long-life extension programs to run at least until 2023. I wouldn't be surprised that the E3's on the Yamagata Shinkansen will no longer run coupled with other trains in a few years.

2) I wonder what trainset is being proposed for the Texas HSR system. I wouldn't be surprised if it's a modified E7 trainset with a slightly pointier nose to allow a top speed of around 275 km/h.
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Old January 9th, 2014, 04:57 PM   #1085
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Originally Posted by sacto7654 View Post
I wonder what trainset is being proposed for the Texas HSR system. I wouldn't be surprised if it's a modified E7 trainset with a slightly pointier nose to allow a top speed of around 275 km/h.
I doubt it since JRC is taking the lead for the Texas HSR system. It would probably be N700i.
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Old January 9th, 2014, 07:57 PM   #1086
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Will the Texas HSR be mixed or HST only?
A standard Shinkansen train is 0.4m wider then a standard US passenger car and in the Southern US low platforms are more common, making it very difficult to blend Shinkansen with anything else.
As the passenger numbers will likely never reach the Japanese levels a HST only system will probably never be profitable.
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Old January 9th, 2014, 09:35 PM   #1087
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HST only. I would expect JR Central has already done their homework on whether or not they can make money off of it.

Not sure if I posted this already, but here is their promo video for the project:

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Old January 10th, 2014, 12:03 AM   #1088
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Will the Texas HSR be mixed or HST only?
A standard Shinkansen train is 0.4m wider then a standard US passenger car and in the Southern US low platforms are more common, making it very difficult to blend Shinkansen with anything else.
As the passenger numbers will likely never reach the Japanese levels a HST only system will probably never be profitable.
That is indeed very unlikely, however traffic doesn't have to be THAT high for HSR to pay for itself. In Texas pretty much everybody who can afford to travel anywhere owns a car so it is very important that the newly built rail is a lot faster than driving and at the same time not massively more expensive.
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Old January 10th, 2014, 01:52 AM   #1089
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HST only. I would expect JR Central has already done their homework on whether or not they can make money off of it.
With the FRA likely to make some changes in their regulations for passenger trainsets to allow more foreign-designed trainsets to run in the USA, we could see N700-i trainsets zooming between Dallas and Houston at 300 km/h (186 mph), which means downtown Dallas to down Houston in circa 1.75 hours. And because the Texas terrain between Dallas and Houston is relatively flat, that means construction costs on a per kilometer basis won't be ridiculous, either.
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Old January 10th, 2014, 04:48 AM   #1090
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E6 clips from 2013.
In a little over 2 months, the Akita Shinkansen will be nothing but E6 series.
What about the E5?
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Old January 10th, 2014, 06:09 AM   #1091
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What about the E5?
Akita Shinkansen is a mini shinkansen route in which requires a smaller loading gauge thus the E6.
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Old January 12th, 2014, 03:43 AM   #1092
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Old January 12th, 2014, 07:10 AM   #1093
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Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
That is indeed very unlikely, however traffic doesn't have to be THAT high for HSR to pay for itself. In Texas pretty much everybody who can afford to travel anywhere owns a car so it is very important that the newly built rail is a lot faster than driving and at the same time not massively more expensive.
People should also keep in mind that Houston, Dallas, and other cities in Texas tend to be more sprawling and more spread out compared with European, Japanese, or even cities in the Northeast US and/or California. Many travelers heading in either direction are probably not heading to the cities themselves but the suburbs which tend to be car orientated. So the advantage that High Speed Rail has in other parts of the world might not necessarily apply here.
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Old January 12th, 2014, 12:08 PM   #1094
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Tokaido Shinkansen?
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Old January 12th, 2014, 02:20 PM   #1095
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People should also keep in mind that Houston, Dallas, and other cities in Texas tend to be more sprawling and more spread out compared with European, Japanese, or even cities in the Northeast US and/or California. Many travelers heading in either direction are probably not heading to the cities themselves but the suburbs which tend to be car orientated. So the advantage that High Speed Rail has in other parts of the world might not necessarily apply here.
That is true, but there are plenty of people who's starting or ending point is in the central district of one of the cities. Suburb to suburb travel is probably not going to be attractive with this service particularly considering that the driving time from Houston to Dallas is not that large (= we are not in a fly + rent a car situation).
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Old January 12th, 2014, 10:23 PM   #1096
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Tokaido Shinkansen?
Yes, in this case. Could just as well have been the Sanyo Shinkansen line, since several trains do through service onto it.
The video was shot at this location: http://goo.gl/maps/nrDHc
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Old January 14th, 2014, 01:46 AM   #1097
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Huh, It's near Kyoto! I thought It was Hamamatsu or Nagoya area...
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Old January 19th, 2014, 06:24 PM   #1098
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Does anyone happen to know if the Chuo Shinkansen will be running at ground-level anywhere in the Tokyo area? Or what the approaches to Nagoya will look like (route, elevation, etc.)?

Also, is there a map of the Ou-Uetsu Shinkansen available in any detail?

Why do some stretches (Kyushu, Tohoku near Utsunomiya, essentially mimic the zairaisen tracks, but elevated? Doesn't that cause problems for the eventual grade separation of the local lines? Not to mention reducing top speeds on the Shinkansen.

Finally, why is it that so many Shinkansen stops are elevated? I think that Maibara and Karuizawa are ground-level, and Ueno and Annaka-Haruna are underground. One would think that there would be massive savings on real estate if they ran more of the line underground in places like Osaka, Nagoya, and Kyoto.
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Old January 19th, 2014, 11:24 PM   #1099
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Let's see.
Most of the Chuo Shinkansen Line will be deep underground (40m+) in the Tokyo/Nagoya areas since that will save them the cost of land acquisition in these areas. But by going deep underground the cost for the tunnelling will rise accordingly so it will still be very expensive, it will still save time not having to do very little land acquisitions.

I can't say that I have seen one, maybe someone else can help?

As said before, the cost to actually build a straight line right through a city will be astronomical if they decide to do that. More cost efficient to run it along rail corridors already in use. Sure tighter bends in the lines will reduce the top speed at those sections, but they don't really matter since most trains will stop at the station in the city (hence they will be reducing speed anyway) and that there are stringent noise limits enforced in Japan, meaning that the trains can't go speeding through a city at full speed as well.

Easy answer, grade separation. But as you said, there are several different types of stations, it all depends on the surroundings where they are located (also on the Tokaido Shinkansen Line there might have been a way to save cost, by not elevating some stations when they were built in the 1960's).
By having it up in the air makes it simple to grade separate them with all other lines, and will make it easier for roads, passages and other things that have to be near a station to fit easily and cost efficient.
Sure they could free up land by undergrounding the stations and lines in the big cities, but there are almost always other lines running in parallel so you have to underground them as well for it to be a viable option.
And I also don't think that the money that you can earn from the relatively small area the lines use will cover all the cost to make the tunnels and underground station buildings so it's not really a viable option.

There is a commonly known fact that as soon as you decide to go underground all your assumptions on how much something will cost will go out the window. It will always cost more..
A very "infamous" project is the Swedish Hallandsås tunnel, which were supposed to be built within a couple of years and cost no more than 1 billion SEK, they have now been at it for 22 years and it will hopefully finally open next year, at a total cost of 12 billion SEK.
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Old January 22nd, 2014, 05:01 AM   #1100
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Interesting.

Is there a detailed map of the Chuo alignment through Tokyo-especially Shinagawa-anywhere?

Is there a map of the Joetsu extension to Shinjuku anywhere?

Lastly, does anyone have a favorite Shinkansen interior design?
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