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Old May 1st, 2014, 07:51 PM   #1241
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Recent news about Maglev ?
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Old May 5th, 2014, 07:25 AM   #1242
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Are the Hokuriko shinkansen line would also use FGT in the near future? Because their are prohibition for putting change the gauge from standard to narrow.
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Old May 5th, 2014, 07:27 AM   #1243
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The FGT is very closely to E7 when it comes to shape of the front.
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Old May 5th, 2014, 07:50 AM   #1244
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riles28 View Post
Are the Hokuriko shinkansen line would also use FGT in the near future? Because their are prohibition for putting change the gauge from standard to narrow.
Yes, there is a proposal to run FGT once the Hokuriku Shinkansen reaches Tsuruga (est. 2025). This will allow one-seat through services to Osaka (via the Kosei Line) and to Maibara/Nagoya (via the Tokaido Line).
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Old May 5th, 2014, 10:41 AM   #1245
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
Yes, there is a proposal to run FGT once the Hokuriku Shinkansen reaches Tsuruga (est. 2025). This will allow one-seat through services to Osaka (via the Kosei Line) and to Maibara/Nagoya (via the Tokaido Line).
Great idea whether you are from north, south, east and west connecting by one train using FGT.
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Old May 11th, 2014, 05:21 AM   #1246
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New livery for Shinkansen E4 series like former E1 units. Now, E4 series do the MAX Toki and MAX Tanigawa services on the Joetsu Shinkansen.




Former E1 regular on services MAX Tanigawa and MAX Toki:



E2 series have a similar livery:









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Old May 11th, 2014, 12:14 PM   #1247
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sr.Horn View Post
New livery for Shinkansen E4 series like former E1 units. Now, E4 series do the MAX Toki and MAX Tanigawa services on the Joetsu Shinkansen.



Is this Takasaki Station in the Gunma Prefecture?
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Old May 11th, 2014, 01:09 PM   #1248
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Yea
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Old May 12th, 2014, 01:27 PM   #1249
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i like the new E4 Series

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Old May 28th, 2014, 08:21 PM   #1250
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From Rail Journal:

Quote:
http://www.railjournal.com/index.php...ml?channel=542

Tracklaying completed on Nagano – Kanazawa Shinkansen
Wednesday, May 28, 2014



A CEREMONY was held at Toyama station on May 24 to mark the completion of tracklaying on the 228km Nagano – Kanazawa section of the Hokuriku Shinkansen, with around 60 dignitaries tightening bolts on the final section of rail.

The Nagano - Kanazawa section has five tunnels the longest being the 2.2km Iiyama tunnel, and a number of major bridges spanning rivers. There are six intermediate stations including Joetsu, Itoigawa and Toyama. Tracklaying began in December 2010 in the Iiyama Tunnel and test operation began on the section between Nagano and Kurobe in Toyama prefecture in December 2013. Testing is due to be extended to the Kurobe – Kanazawa section in August and commercial services will begin operating on the Yen 1.78 trillion ($US 17.5bn) line next March.

The line will be jointly operated by JR East and JR West, and the two railways have jointly procured a fleet of 27 trains for Tokyo – Kanazawa services, which will be known as series E7 by JR East and series W7 by JR West.

The journey time between Tokyo and Kanazawa will be cut to 2h 30min from 3h 47min via the present route which involves taking a Joetsu Shinkansen train from Tokyo to Echigo-Yuzawa and connecting with a 1067mm-gauge train on the Hokuetsu Kyuko line which has a maximum speed of 160km/h.
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Old May 28th, 2014, 11:42 PM   #1251
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The Iiyama tunnel is 22.2 km long, not 2.2. Long, but quite shallow: 325 m at the deepest point.
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Old May 29th, 2014, 12:01 AM   #1252
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Does anyone happen to know what was displaced by the Tohoku extension from Omiya to Ueno?

Particularly at Nippori where the tracks emerge from below ground. And at Akabane and Omiya, did they remove additional platforms at those stations?
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Old May 29th, 2014, 01:12 AM   #1253
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Nippori

At Nippori 2 island platforms were removed, you can tell from the platform numbers which jump from 4 to 9. Platforms 5-6 & 7-8 were removed and were replaced with 4 tracks without a platform and the entrance to the tunnel. But not much more has been done to the JR station, it's mostly the Keisei station which has seen a complete transformation in recent years.


Akabane

Akabane Station was completely transformed with the Tohoku line extension, but everything was pretty much done in the same space as the old station. At the same time as the construction of the Shinkansen tracks the regular tracks in the station were also elevated. This was actually only fully completed in 1998. The construction of the Saikyo Line also meant the addition of an extra Island platform, this line was constructed together with the Tohoku line extension and follows the same route between Akabane and Omiya.

Akabane Station 1974


http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%A4%...89%E7%9C%8C%29


Omiya

The Shinkansen Station in Omiya was constructed on the west side of the station, right next to the regular station. It was constructed on the side of the freight tracks and the old west station building. The whole area on this side of the station has been redeveloped at the same time, there was a lot of space available.


Omiya Station 1975


http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E5%A4%...89%E7%9C%8C%29
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Old May 29th, 2014, 07:23 AM   #1254
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From now, test rides.

Quote:
Hokuriku Shinkansen line between Nagano, Kanazawa completed





TOYAMA--With the tightening of final ceremonial bolts here at JR Toyama Station on May 24, the Nagano-Kanazawa section of the Hokuriku Shinkansen line was completed about a year ahead of the first official run.

The railway connects Tokyo and Kanazawa, capital of Ishikawa Prefecture, and runs through the cities of Nagano and Toyama. Bullet trains are already operating between Tokyo and Nagano.

Eventually, it will connect Tokyo and Osaka, a second bullet train line between the two major cities, along with the Tokaido Shinkansen.

In the ceremony on May 24, about 60 people including local government leaders of four prefectures along the line--Nagano, Niigata, Toyama and Ishikawa--tightened the last bolts. Then, a rail car for construction work made a ceremonial run along the connected rail.

After the Hokuriku Shinkansen line starts operations in spring 2015, bullet trains will run the 454-kilometer railway between Tokyo and Kanazawa in about two and a half hours. Travel time between Tokyo and Toyama will be about two hours.

Meanwhile, the section between Kanazawa and Tsuruga, Fukui Prefecture, is scheduled to be operating around 2025. The route between Tsuruga and Osaka has yet to be decided.

The total construction costs of the Nagano-Kanazawa section stand at about 1.78 trillion yen ($17.5 billion). Workers began to lay tracks in December 2010 in the Iiyama Tunnel in Iiyama, northern Nagano Prefecture.

Test runs started in December 2013 in the stretch between Nagano and Kurobe, Toyama Prefecture. In the section between Kurobe and Kanazawa, test runs are scheduled to start in August this year.

In the testing, West Japan Railway Co.’s latest W7 series trains will travel at a speed of up to 260 kilometers per hour. Staff members will also check the gaps in heights between the trains and platforms of each station.
ASAHI SHIMBUN

FNN News report:

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Old June 9th, 2014, 03:21 AM   #1255
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It's official. The E4 will soon be leaving service on JR East:

In the Need for Speed, JR East Retiring all Double-Decker Shinkansen
Asahi Shimbun English web site
June 6, 2014

Read the full article here

Quote:
With speed taking priority over capacity, East Japan Railway Co. (JR East) will retire all double-decker Shinkansen trains that have carried commuters to and from Tokyo for 30 years.

The Joetsu Shinkansen Line, which connects the nation’s capital with cities in Niigata Prefecture, is currently the only JR East bullet train service with the bilevel cars.

“Speed will become more important as the Hokuriku Shinkansen will start operating in 2015, followed by the Hokkaido Shinkansen in 2016,” a JR East official said. “I should say that double-decker trains, which prioritized mass transport over speed, have completed their role.”
The article does not state when will the E4's retire, but my guess is it could be as early as March 2015, probably two weeks before the start of the 2015 fiscal year in Japan.

I personally think this may lead to a speedup of Jōetsu Shinkansen services, since we no longer have E4's limited to 240 km/h on this line. My guess is that with later-production E2's now moved to the Jōetsu line to effectively turn Jōetsu Shinkansen service into all E2 trainsets, the top speed will be raised from the current 240 km/h to 260 km/h between Omiya and Takasaki (to maintain compatibility with the newly-arriving E7/W7 trainsets) and 275 km/h between Takasaki and Niigata.
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Old June 10th, 2014, 11:18 AM   #1256
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They also do not seem to need the double deckers anymore. Also they aren't very popular, probably because of the 3+3 seating in unreserved standard class. It would be no problem at all to build faster ones though, considering that the fastest train in the world (Alstom V150) was also double deck, because of better aerodynamics.
All JR's know they could always have double deck Shinkansen again should the need arise.
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Old June 10th, 2014, 12:54 PM   #1257
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For almost a year they already scapping some Sets


https://www.youtube.com/user/akihito327

March or September of 2016 will retire all Sets
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Old June 14th, 2014, 05:12 PM   #1258
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Quite interesting article:

Why Japan's high-speed trains are so good

Quote:
MANY countries seem obsessed with high-speed rail. On June 4th in the Queen's speech, the opening of the British parliament for 2014-15, the government confirmed its commitment to a controversial high-speed link known as HS2. France is slowly expanding its high-speed lines (known as the TGV) while other countries, such as Spain and China, are rapidly enlarging their networks of whizzy trains. Japan's high-speed "bullet" train is often held up as an exemplar by rail boosters and governments keen to acquire their own shiny new train-sets. How did Japan come to be the world leader in high-speed trains?

Trains are symbolic of modernity in Japan. During the Meiji restoration in the late 19th century, when Japan modernised at break-neck speed, the high technology of the day was the locomotive. By the 1930s the first railway trunk route, linking Tokyo with cities such as Nagoya, Kyoto, Osaka and Kobe, had become heavily congested, according to Christian Wolmar, a railway expert. The first high-speed railway, known as the Shinkansen ("new mainline"), cut journeys between Tokyo and Osaka by two hours (from six to four) when it opened in 1964. This made it competitive with air travel, an industry which Japan had eschewed after the second world war, to avoid inadvertently stoking fears of rearmament. Geography influenced the rail network's development: most of Japan's 128m inhabitants live in a few densely-populated parts of the country. By linking those dense populations together—nearly 40m people in greater Tokyo with 20m residents of Osaka, Kobe and Kyoto—the railway helped to shift business patterns, making day-trips between Tokyo and Osaka possible. Many of its customers were rich and willing to pay for more expensive high-speed tickets. The service had carried 100m passengers within three years and 1 billion by 1976. Now around 143m use the railway annually.

In 1987 Japan's national railways were divided and privatised into seven for-profit companies. JR East, the largest by passenger numbers, does not require any direct public subsidy from the Japanese government, unlike the heavily-subsidised TGV in France. One reason for its efficiency is that JR East owns all the infrastructure on the route—the stations, the rolling stock and the tracks—meaning there are fewer management teams duplicating each other's work. (By contrast in Britain, for instance, ownership of the tracks and trains is split up.) But the railway also thrives because of a planning system that encourages the building of commercial developments and housing alongside the railway route. JR East owns the land around the railways and lets it out; nearly a third of its revenue comes from shopping malls, blocks of offices, flats and the like. This money is reinvested in the network. In Britain, where planning and transport are rarely aligned, it is hard to create similarly successful commercial developments. Indeed, most of the plans for the areas around the stations of HS2 are vague, and some of the stops along an earlier line, HS1, are still underdeveloped, years after the line was built.

The ability to build large developments alongside the high-speed railways is a boon to the Japanese bullet line, as is the ability to charge high ticket prices. (When Koichi Tanaka, a scientist, won the Nobel Prize in 2002 he was reported as saying he would use the money to buy a ticket on the Shinkansen, to loud cheers.) But even so, 71% of the revenue from passenger tickets at JR East comes from the conventional, slower railway. Countries looking to lay down speedy new tracks might want to consider investing in their existing railway lines as well.
http://www.economist.com/blogs/econo...trainaresogood
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Old June 14th, 2014, 05:57 PM   #1259
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That Economist article points out the reason why JR Kyushu has built massive shopping complexes around Hakata, Kokura and Kagoshima-Chūō Stations and why JR West does the same with their major stations.
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Old June 15th, 2014, 06:52 PM   #1260
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What's the total mileage in the basic plan again?
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