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Old June 16th, 2014, 06:28 PM   #1261
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If you talk about commercial developments along the railway route, you should look at Tokyu Corporation. They are exporting their urban development model to Vietnam nowadays. http://www.amchamvietnam.com/5653/ja...in-binh-duong/
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Old June 17th, 2014, 04:21 PM   #1262
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That's a good point. Most of the big commercial development by railway companies in Japan (the so-called TOD in N. America), is done along legacy and urban/commuter rail lines. Which makes sense, because people use commuter trains and urban transit everyday, unlike high speed rail, which is used only occasionally by most. Something to consider when people tout, perhaps over-enthusiastically, TOD around high speed rail stations.
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Old June 17th, 2014, 06:54 PM   #1263
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
That's a good point. Most of the big commercial development by railway companies in Japan (the so-called TOD in N. America), is done along legacy and urban/commuter rail lines. Which makes sense, because people use commuter trains and urban transit everyday, unlike high speed rail, which is used only occasionally by most. Something to consider when people tout, perhaps over-enthusiastically, TOD around high speed rail stations.
Um, are you saying development around lines or around stations? Because people cannot use lines, only stations.

How many Shinkansen stations exist in Japan?
On the whole Tokaido Shinkansen, 17 stations, there is exactly 1 station that is not a zairaisen station (Shin-Fuji). Is there any development there? And how about the rest of Shinkansen network?
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Old June 18th, 2014, 03:11 PM   #1264
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Of course, the primary development occurs at stations, which are located along (or at the ends) of railway lines- were you being deliberately obtuse? In the case of Tokyu, which is one of the pioneers of TOD in Japan, whole neighborhoods popped up around their lines/stations, such as a good portion of territory along the Den-en Toshi Line.

As for shinkansen stations, most of the development is due to the presence of legacy lines with sufficient traffic sharing the same station. Greenfield HSR stations w/o legacy rail links lack attractiveness for tenants ("there is no there, there")- Shin Yokohama Station was located in a very rural area of patchwork farms and open fields, and remained underdeveloped until the 1980's, despite having a legacy rail connection- only within the last 10 years has a shopping center w/ a major tenant been constructed next to the station. More recently, the site of the Shin-Hakodate/Hokuto station is having trouble attracting tenants- even JR is not interested in building a hotel next to their station.
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Old June 18th, 2014, 08:12 PM   #1265
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post

Of course, the primary development occurs at stations, which are located along (or at the ends) of railway lines- were you being deliberately obtuse? In the case of Tokyu, which is one of the pioneers of TOD in Japan, whole neighborhoods popped up around their lines/stations, such as a good portion of territory along the Den-en Toshi Line.
What land grants do Japanese railways get? Is it a fixed width strip along the line regardless of where the railway chooses to make stations, or something else?

If it is a fixed width strip then it is hard to develop the vicinity of stations because that´s where the railway needs to use the full width of its land grant for the station itself. It is in the stationless stretches of railway that the railway ends up with strips of land in excess of their needs, and available for commercial development....
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Old June 24th, 2014, 04:23 AM   #1266
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Old June 24th, 2014, 03:10 PM   #1267
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
Shin Yokohama Station was located in a very rural area of patchwork farms and open fields, and remained underdeveloped until the 1980's, despite having a legacy rail connection- only within the last 10 years has a shopping center w/ a major tenant been constructed next to the station.
If the information from Wikipedia is correct, the area around Shin-Yokohama Station--despite being the intersection with the (then) JNR Yokohama Line--stayed undeveloped until the Yokohama Subway Blue Line was extended to Shin-Yokohama in 1985. (Before then, only the Kodama all-stops train stopped at Shin-Yokohama.) Real development took off during th 1990's, when the arrival of the Nozomi trains using the faster 300, 500 and finally 700 Series Shinkansen trainsets made it possible for all Nozomi trains to stop at Shin-Yokohama without disturbing the time scheduling.
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Old June 24th, 2014, 03:55 PM   #1268
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sacto7654 View Post
If the information from Wikipedia is correct, the area around Shin-Yokohama Station--despite being the intersection with the (then) JNR Yokohama Line--stayed undeveloped until the Yokohama Subway Blue Line was extended to Shin-Yokohama in 1985. (Before then, only the Kodama all-stops train stopped at Shin-Yokohama.) Real development took off during th 1990's, when the arrival of the Nozomi trains using the faster 300, 500 and finally 700 Series Shinkansen trainsets made it possible for all Nozomi trains to stop at Shin-Yokohama without disturbing the time scheduling.
The area was basically a swamp and was difficult to develop right away. I live quite near the place and remember the area before development really took off.
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Old June 24th, 2014, 08:17 PM   #1269
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Some Shinkansen trains passing Maibara Station on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen line:

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Old June 27th, 2014, 01:42 PM   #1270
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Old July 1st, 2014, 10:56 AM   #1271
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Quote:
Foot baths to debut on Yamagata bullet train

YAMAGATA – JR East unveiled on Monday a new “resort train” that will allow passengers on the Yamagata Shinkansen Line to soothe their feet.

The carriage, which was shown to the media in the city of Yamagata, will make its debut July 19, allowing tourists to enjoy the landscape along the train line while soaking their feet in an “ashiyu,” or warm-water foot bath.

The service will be offered in one car of the six-car train on the route connecting Fukushima Station in Fukushima Prefecture with Shinjo Station in Yamagata Prefecture. The train can hold 143 passengers.

The special car will contain two red foot baths that are supposed to resemble fields of red safflowers — the symbol of Yamagata Prefecture. Another car will be fitted with tatami to relax on after the soak, as well as a bar that will serve locally brewed sake.
THE JAPAN TIMES


Some photos from www.tetsudo-shimbun.com

























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Old July 2nd, 2014, 03:41 PM   #1272
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Alas, this special train will NOT be travelling on the main Tōhoku Shinkansen line--it's only on the Yamagata Shinkansen line between Fukushima and Shinjo, so the top speed is limited to 130 km/h (81 mph).
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Old July 3rd, 2014, 11:54 AM   #1273
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From Railway Gazette:

Quote:
http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/h...t-testing.html

Series W7 Shinkansen ready to start testing
03 Jul 2014






JR West Series W7 high speed trainset, photos by Akihiro Nakamura

JAPAN: JR West is preparing to start testing the Series W7 trainsets it is acquiring for use on the Hokuriku Shinkansen which opens for revenue service in March 2015. Two trainsets are being commissioned at Hakusan depot, around 10 km west of Kanazawa, ready for the start of test running on the new line from August 1.

The 10 Series W7 sets are identical to the 17 Series E7 units being purchased by JR East, creating a combined fleet of 27 units. A development of the Series E2 design built in 1995-2002, the trains are being supplied by Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Hitachi, J-TEC, and Kinki Sharyo. Like the Series E2s, they are equipped to operate at both 25 kV 50 Hz and 25 kV 60 Hz, changing frequency three times in the course of a journey between Tokyo and Kanazawa.

Each 12-car trainset is formed of two driving trailers and 10 intermediate motor cars powered by AC motors using VVVF inverter controls. A total power rating of 12 MW will enable the trains to run at up to 275 km/h on the line’s 3% gradients, although the maximum speed in service is expected to remain at 260 km/h. The trains are fitted with low-noise pantographs and snow ploughs to cope with heavy snowfall in the region. The braking performance has been boosted by 10% to cope with the steep gradients and to ensure a safe emergency stop in the event of an earthquake.

The vehicles have aluminium alloy bodyshells to an aerodynamic profile. The single GranClass car in each set has full active suspension, with a semi-active suspension provided for the remaining 11. Each train will accommodate 18 GranClass passengers, 63 in Green Car and 835 in standard class. The exterior livery of ivory and sky blue, with a copper lining, represents a theme of Wa no Mirai (the future of harmony), combining traditional Japanese craftsmanship with the latest technology.

The two railways plan to operate three types of service on the Hokuriku Shinkansen. Kagayaki expresses will connect Tokyo and Kanazawa in 2 h 30 min, while intermediate stations will be served by the slower Hakutaka trains. JR West will also operate a Turuga shuttle service along the coastal section between Toyama and Kanazawa
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Old July 3rd, 2014, 12:12 PM   #1274
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Old July 21st, 2014, 06:07 PM   #1275
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What is the steepest grade on the Shinkansen? Where is it/what line is it? Does anyone know? Pictures, please?

Also, which stations are underground? Could someone post pictures of the platforms?
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Old July 22nd, 2014, 05:10 PM   #1276
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The steepest grade is between Annanka Haruna and Karuizawa, at 3% or 30 permils, on the Nagano Shinkansen. This is mainly in tunnel, but this section just outside Annaka Haruna appears to have a grade (down direction i.e. away from Tokyo trains are left to right, going up the grade):
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Old July 22nd, 2014, 05:16 PM   #1277
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Ueno Station, underground shinkansen station, last month:
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Old July 23rd, 2014, 06:19 AM   #1278
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By the way, in the original plan for the alignment for the Nagano Shinkansen line through the Ueda Valley, they planned to bypass Karuizawa with the alignment much further south, which allowed for at most 1% grades. The decision to accommodate the location of the original JNR Karuizawa Station is the reason why east of Karuizawa, the grade is quite steep so the line can reach Takasaki in the shortest fashion possible.
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Old July 25th, 2014, 03:44 PM   #1279
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I boarded E7 in Omiya earlier this month









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Old August 1st, 2014, 09:25 PM   #1280
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Does anyone know of any articles talking about the impact of all the LCCs opening up in Japan recently? Peach, Jetstar... is there talk of reducing prices on the Shinkansen to compete or are they comfortable with the declining pax count?

Do they see the LCC industry as unsustainable, even as they built new expensive lines like the Chuo Maglev line?
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