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Old November 2nd, 2014, 02:33 PM   #1361
loefet
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OK, did some research and I understand now.
Don't get me wrong, I do love the Talgo system, I believe that they could work very well here in Sweden. But in this case it's a bit redundant, since there are plans to make the Tokaido line faster without the need for it.
Also as you said, they have to do some major redesign of the system to make it work with the higher platform level of Japan, which in terms makes it less ideal. And as: bluemeansgo wrote, the chance of Japan getting trains from another place than Japan is pretty slim, there are just a handful of train designs in Japan that comes from foreign producers.
Do you know if there is a "high platform" version of the Talgo system, or is it more or less fixed for the low platforms here in Europe?
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Old November 2nd, 2014, 03:18 PM   #1362
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In the end, I still expect JR Central to push N700A trainsets to 300 km/h on the Tokaidō Shinkansen line, primarily on parts of the line between Mishima and Toyohashi Stations and between Maibara and Kyoto Stations. Given the faster acceleration of the N700A trainset, this may become possible once the original 700 Series trainsets are phased out and the N700 Series are running on both Hikari and Kodama services.
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Old November 2nd, 2014, 03:24 PM   #1363
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Adding new rolling stock with a tilting system other than the simple, low maintenance air cushion system now in use is a solution in search of a problem.
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Old November 2nd, 2014, 07:27 PM   #1364
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loefet View Post
OK, did some research and I understand now.
Don't get me wrong, I do love the Talgo system, I believe that they could work very well here in Sweden. But in this case it's a bit redundant, since there are plans to make the Tokaido line faster without the need for it.
Also as you said, they have to do some major redesign of the system to make it work with the higher platform level of Japan, which in terms makes it less ideal. And as: bluemeansgo wrote, the chance of Japan getting trains from another place than Japan is pretty slim, there are just a handful of train designs in Japan that comes from foreign producers.
Do you know if there is a "high platform" version of the Talgo system, or is it more or less fixed for the low platforms here in Europe?
No high platform version, only a future version of Avril (the G4, G3 is current and remains low) that have some high doors and other low.
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=542
The AVRIL G3 is no longer pendulum and has wide box to hold 3 + 2 standard seats in the UIC gauge by a positioning system boxes.

The regular train was tested in the Northeast Corridor of the USA in 1988 and had to take two steps to climb from the train to the platform.
Here's a picture, but what you see is the boxcar with a much higher goal with ladder.
http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=848
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Old November 2nd, 2014, 09:52 PM   #1365
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Shinkansen trains are designed specifically to run on Shinkansen tracks. The two are generally built for each other.

A foreign train system would essentially have to be built specifically for the standards of the Japanese system. Not many manufacturers of trains want to take the risk when there are so many greenfield opportunities in North America and southern Asia and Europe as well!

Although some may complain I protectionism is these markets, I suspect that the bigger reason is much simpler: cost and risk.

What is more likely is that certain technologies (for example the passive tilting technology) would be licensed for use in the system.

There's lots of competition even within Japan for these trains. It is a tough market to enter.
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Old November 2nd, 2014, 09:57 PM   #1366
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One more point though. Nozomi service will likely still exist on JR west with tgrouch service to Tokyo. It will be interesting to see whether future train sets focus more on optimizing for the Sanyo line (the gorgeous 500 series comes to mind) which has a more generous minimum 4000m track radius.

Also, the n700 is a jr west + central train. I wonder if jr west will take more control of train tech as central purs its energies behind maglev.
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Old November 4th, 2014, 02:27 PM   #1367
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluemeansgo View Post
One more point though. Nozomi service will likely still exist on JR west with tgrouch service to Tokyo. It will be interesting to see whether future train sets focus more on optimizing for the Sanyo line (the gorgeous 500 series comes to mind) which has a more generous minimum 4000m track radius.

Also, the n700 is a jr west + central train. I wonder if jr west will take more control of train tech as central purs its energies behind maglev.
You forget that the 500 series suffers from low acceleration and tunnel boom at high speeds. As pretty as it is, the chances of it seeing extended service seems to be low.

I have a feeling that its legendary appearance and popularity as a cultural symbol is the only reason why JR even bothered with refurbishing them as Kodama for Sanyo Shinkansen.

They're essentially white elephants, sadly.
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Old November 5th, 2014, 05:58 AM   #1368
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Are the JR West consider the design of E7 in designing their own FGT Train, for me the body of E7 is fit for the narrow gauge.
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Old November 6th, 2014, 01:59 AM   #1369
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Hi everyone. I am traveling to Japan and am interested in watching some Shinkansen trains fly past. Someone suggested going to some small town and rural areas on the Tohoku Shinkansen line north of Tokyo. He suggested around the Fukushima area.

He told me that there are some original sections of track that has normal railroad crossings with roads that I could get to and watch trains fly by. This is not at stations. Does anyone know of any places to do this that I could get to fairly easily. I don't speak Japanese and I don't have a car.

Thanks for any help.

Luke
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Old November 6th, 2014, 02:55 AM   #1370
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Old November 6th, 2014, 04:27 AM   #1371
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkstrknb View Post
Hi everyone. I am traveling to Japan and am interested in watching some Shinkansen trains fly past. Someone suggested going to some small town and rural areas on the Tohoku Shinkansen line north of Tokyo. He suggested around the Fukushima area.

He told me that there are some original sections of track that has normal railroad crossings with roads that I could get to and watch trains fly by. This is not at stations. Does anyone know of any places to do this that I could get to fairly easily. I don't speak Japanese and I don't have a car.

Thanks for any help.

Luke
First of all, if you want to see "fast" trains, going to a grade crossing will not satsify that need- trains are restricted to 130km/h on lines with crossings, so even shinkansen trains will be running the same speed as conventional trains. For access to such a crossing, just take a mini-shinkansen line (either Yamagata or Akita) and get off at one of the intermediate stations. You'll likely find a crossing after a walk- first check a good map (online) though.
If you really want to see shinkansen trains going by at speeds above 270km/h, better to go to one of the "smaller" stations along the tohoku shinkansen line, such as Koriyama or Nasu Shiobara (the latter being good b/c its on a curve)
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Old November 6th, 2014, 06:59 AM   #1372
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Thank you k.k.jetcar, you have a good suggestion. The person I spoke with said the Shinkansen run at full speed through these road crossings but that doesn't seem very realistic.
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Old November 6th, 2014, 09:40 AM   #1373
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By full speed that would be the max 130km/h for lines with grade crossings. It is a safety regulation as 130km/h is the fastest a train can run and then brake to a stop within 600m should there be an obstruction at the crossing.
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Old November 6th, 2014, 03:10 PM   #1374
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Im sorry for the US imperial numbers, but 130km/h is about 80 miles/h. In Michigan, they recently increased the speed of the Amtrak line to 110mph which is 177km/h. This line has multiple grade crossings.

ps: Why can't the US go Metric like the rest of the world?
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Old November 6th, 2014, 03:48 PM   #1375
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Speed for the whole line, including at crossings?
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Old November 6th, 2014, 06:59 PM   #1376
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Why shouldn't it, I mean as you may know here in Sweden then the trains goes through level crossings at up to 200 km/h, heck they even go past smaller stations (on track next to the platform) at the same kinds of speed.
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Old November 7th, 2014, 10:49 AM   #1377
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No reason why not, most countries with barrier controlled level crossings can pass through them at speed. I was just asking for clarification.
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Old November 7th, 2014, 01:06 PM   #1378
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In Spain: 155 km/h máximum.
In Sweden 200 ?, There is no limit, then?
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Old November 7th, 2014, 02:12 PM   #1379
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The 130 km/h limit in Japan is based on the distance from which a driver could identify an obstruction and have sufficient time to bring the train to a halt. This way trains do not have to be constructed to endure heavy impacts. The US, on the other hand, chose to make their equipment more sturdy, because they anticipate a higher collision risk. Europe is somewhere in between.

The effect: A complete 10 car JR E233 train set weighs about the same as 2 US freight locos.
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Old November 9th, 2014, 06:07 AM   #1380
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
If you really want to see shinkansen trains going by at speeds above 270km/h, better to go to one of the "smaller" stations along the tohoku shinkansen line, such as Koriyama or Nasu Shiobara (the latter being good b/c its on a curve)
There is a railway museum my daughter took me to, my understanding was that it was in Omiya, but from Wikipedia it seems that it is in Saitama? Anyway, there is a viewing platform on the roof where you can watch the shinkansen fly past. Awesome place, I could have spent all day there.
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