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Old May 2nd, 2016, 03:58 PM   #2621
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@SounderBruce

Thanks for explanation. I looked from the European view on transit. In Europe, everything is much simpler, because railway is state-owned.

But, in Salt Lake City, there is same BNSF, and successful regional rail line, with trains every hour in non rush hours.

In any case, for some future regional line Tacoma-Seattle-Everette, it is needed to be skip-stop, not just usual LRT. It is possible to build it with LRT technology (light axle load, steeper gradient, shorter way of acceleration and deceleration).
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Old May 2nd, 2016, 06:05 PM   #2622
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I seem to recall that in Salt Lake City they were able to buy extra space at the side of the right-of-way from Union Pacific and build their own set of tracks to avoid having any conflicts.
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Old May 2nd, 2016, 10:52 PM   #2623
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 00Zy99 View Post
I seem to recall that in Salt Lake City they were able to buy extra space at the side of the right-of-way from Union Pacific and build their own set of tracks to avoid having any conflicts.
And I don't see why Seattle which has a even more powerful economy can't do the same as Salt Lake city?
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Old May 2nd, 2016, 11:14 PM   #2624
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Originally Posted by Nexis View Post
And I don't see why Seattle which has a even more powerful economy can't do the same as Salt Lake city?
Because there isn't abundant spare room along the right of way for more tracks, and if there were it would probably be gobbled up by the freight traffic.
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Old May 3rd, 2016, 08:19 AM   #2625
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Because Salt Lake City has an abundance of tracks and right-of-way that we don't hvae. Our geography is really restricted (which makes it very good for transit if you can build it), and the homeowners here can organize themselves into powerful groups fairly quicky (see Kirkland's "Save Our Trail" group).

And Seattle's few tracks are very valuable for BNSF. Oil trains to refineries that in turn is shipped to Asia is a huge business and would need to slow down drastically before BNSF can be lured to the negotiation table.
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Old May 4th, 2016, 06:08 AM   #2626
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If anyone is interested, a 1999 Sound Transit Gillig Phantom, #9060, made its way to New York City. It now operates as #950 for the White Plains Bus Company. This operator is contracted to run shuttles for the Hutchinson Metro Center complex in the Bronx.

IMG_7506 by GojiMet86, on Flickr


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Old May 17th, 2016, 03:12 AM   #2627
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Work on new Tacoma Amtrak station begins 2016.06.06

http://thesubtimes.com/2016/05/13/wo...ns-next-month/
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Old May 27th, 2016, 01:48 AM   #2628
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Sound Transit 3 (ST3)

New iteration of multi-billion dollar plan calls for some lines/stations to open earlier than first imagined. Final details to be released in June. Voters to decide in November.

From the Seattle Times.
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Old May 27th, 2016, 02:03 AM   #2629
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ginkgo View Post
New iteration of multi-billion dollar plan calls for some lines/stations to open earlier than first imagined. Final details to be released in June. Voters to decide in November.

From the Seattle Times.
$54 billion now instead of $50 billion. Ballard fully grade-separated. New downtown tunnel to be funded by the entire region.

New project delivery dates:

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Old June 1st, 2016, 09:30 PM   #2630
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Seattle Light Rail construction plans to possibly be accelerated:

http://www.thestranger.com/news/2016...ht-rail-faster

Full list of possible timeline changes at Sound Transit:

http://soundtransit3.org/
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Old June 2nd, 2016, 07:23 AM   #2631
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Saying goodbye to three of the Waterfront Streetcar trolleys, now headed for St. Louis.


Streetcar 518 readied for trucking by SounderBruce, on Flickr


Streetcar 482 readied for trucking by SounderBruce, on Flickr


Streetcar 482 readied for trucking by SounderBruce, on Flickr


Streetcars readied for trucking by SounderBruce, on Flickr


Streetcar 482 readied for trucking by SounderBruce, on Flickr
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Old June 2nd, 2016, 03:23 PM   #2632
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SounderBruce View Post
Saying goodbye to three of the Waterfront Streetcar trolleys, now headed for St. Louis.
Sad to see them go, but the new modern streetcar will provide service on 1st Avenue, which would almost duplicate the Waterfront streetcar route (well, 500 feet up a steep-ish hill away, anyway).

It would have been nice to see if they could have incorporated the waterfront route into the new Seattle streetcar system, but I'm not even sure that they used the same track gauge.

From what I understand the Waterfront streetcar started out as and always remained a tourist attraction.
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Old June 2nd, 2016, 09:00 PM   #2633
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The main issue would have been lowering the platform height.

They raised the former drop-centers of the ex-Melbourne cars to have a level floor space, and they put in higher-level platforms to preserve handicapped accessibility. Ironically, had they been kept with the low centers there would have been near-total compatibility with the new system.
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Old June 26th, 2016, 09:33 AM   #2634
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In depth analysis of Sound Transit 3 from the Seattle Transit Blog. Voters will decide in November.
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Old June 27th, 2016, 02:18 AM   #2635
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With that much money on the line why not built heavy rail like BART, MARTA or DC Metro?
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Old June 27th, 2016, 03:31 AM   #2636
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Quote:
Originally Posted by achybo View Post
With that much money on the line why not built heavy rail like BART, MARTA or DC Metro?
Because we have an existing light rail system that won't be able to be upgraded that easily? It would be confusing for riders to force a transfer between the light rail segments and a new heavy rail system.

Also, those systems are not ones to emulate. They've got a host of problems they share.
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Old June 27th, 2016, 05:54 AM   #2637
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Quote:
Originally Posted by achybo View Post
With that much money on the line why not built heavy rail like BART, MARTA or DC Metro?
Quote:
Originally Posted by SounderBruce View Post
Also, those systems are not ones to emulate. They've got a host of problems they share.
I read achybo's question to be about the mode choice of Seattle's system rather than than the social and political contexts at fault for those systems' problems (e.g., multiple jurisdictions, expansion favored over maintenance, union and governance structures functioning more as construction project managers than transit operators, etc.).

In that vein, I think the line between heavy rail and light rail can be far blurrier than we think. What we think of as two discrete transportation practices are really the combination of many smaller decisions related to context, infrastructure, and technology.

Looking at the Seattle Link system:
1. capable of three-car (really six-car) operations
2. high frequencies
3. almost exclusive grade separation
4. longer distances between stations, and
5. a regional scope

If you saw that list anywhere else, you'd probably think we were talking about a heavy rail system! It's certainly being built to what would otherwise be considered a heavy rail standard.

Mode differentiation is vastly overstated, in my opinion. Every project is a product of its technology, politics, and context. Just looking at Bus vs. Streetcar vs. Light Rail vs. Heavy Rail, for example, tends to miss the much bigger picture. You can have a train stuck in traffic (most American streetcars) or a bus that is a separated transportation backbone (Curitiba/Bogotá). You can have a massively expensive subway that snakes circuitously between neighborhoods (Barcelona) and is less useful because every politician needed to check a voter's box, or a light rail line that really expands access to dense, high-ridership neighborhoods (Minneapolis). Each of those examples just goes to show that it's as much about what you do with the transportation as it is about whether it's a train or a bus or a slightly bigger train.
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Old June 27th, 2016, 06:17 AM   #2638
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Link is actually capable of 4-car operations (with 400-foot-long platforms), but we only use 3-car trains today because of a lack of rolling stock (only 62 cars total right now, to expand later). The 4-car trains do make appearances during very special events (like the Super Bowl parade).

I do agree that we're building a very heavy rail-like system, but the reality is that heavy rail would turn a lot of people off from funding the system. The flexibility of light rail, even if unused in most new construction, is a huge selling point to voters who fear of high costs and undesirable routing choices (elevated guideways, for example).
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Old June 27th, 2016, 07:16 AM   #2639
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What are Sound Transit's rolling stock plans? Are they going to purchase Super LRVs or will they continue with current LRV designs? Also is there a time table for rolling stock procurement and delivery?
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Old June 27th, 2016, 07:53 AM   #2640
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If by "Super LRV" you mean a longer one, then its unlikely. Longer units create issues with operational flexibility and increased maintenance impact. Staying with the current design allows for economy of scale.

After all, if it is perfectly functional and meets the current and future demands of the system, why not use it?
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