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Old September 30th, 2007, 09:05 AM   #1221
citruspastels
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i think that's how it generally works at most airports. don't think i've seen one with 4.
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Old September 30th, 2007, 09:06 AM   #1222
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citruspastels View Post
i think that's how it generally works at most airports. don't think i've seen one with 4.
I've never seen 4, always two...but some are wider than others.
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Old September 30th, 2007, 03:31 PM   #1223
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Quote:
Originally Posted by -Akira- View Post
I've never seen 4, always two...but some are wider than others.
They got one at O'hare with 4. It goes between Concorses B and C.
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Old September 30th, 2007, 08:01 PM   #1224
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They got one at O'hare with 4. It goes between Concorses B and C.
lol, I hate O'hare, I always try to get Midway when I travel. :-] I have never noticed them.
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Old September 30th, 2007, 10:34 PM   #1225
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The width is probably regulated. Can't have people out of reach of a handrail.
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Old September 30th, 2007, 11:00 PM   #1226
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyAboutCities View Post
Yes Sea-Tac airport does have some at their new Concourse A. I was there last Monday evening and used it.

I agree that Sea-Tac Airport light rail station should add moving walkways direct to the airport. Make it four (two for each direction, one for people who are not in rush and one for people who are in rush)
They couldn't be direct, because it's not a straight line (but they could go quite a distance).

How about contacting the contractor (Mowat, I think) and telling them not to bid 90m on a project that should cost 55m? That's the only way we're going to afford moving walkways.
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Old October 1st, 2007, 12:43 AM   #1227
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Quote:
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I think I'm not being very clear here. Okay, so let's say there's an express train for Surrey, and a local right in front of it? How exactly does it get to Surrey any faster than the local? You do realize that the local train is on the same track the whole time?
yes - thats what would happen

I think thats why they stopped it ??

all I remember is a number of years ago I was at the Granville Street station and a train came that said something to the effect of "This train will be making limited stops (and it listed the stations) to King George" on the notice board ticker and than the voice inside the train said the same thing

this was before the M lin was running so there were a lot less trains on the line

I think all it accomplished was getting groups of people out of downtown and not picking more up along the way as the trains were already pretty full
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Old October 2nd, 2007, 07:37 PM   #1228
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If you do not yet know, Sound Transit has a list of milestones they put out every year to complete that year. September had 7 of them completed. If you want to see the whole list, click here.
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Old October 2nd, 2007, 07:49 PM   #1229
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Great link! Thanks for that...I will be using that on my project.
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Old October 5th, 2007, 02:39 AM   #1230
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Audit finds improvements but "unnecessary" costs in Sound Transit light rail

By Mike Lindblom
Seattle Times transportation reporter


A new state audit of Sound Transit found that the agency has spent $5 million to cover "unnecessary" costs and fines while building its light-rail line from Seattle to Tukwila.

Though significant, that's a fraction of the project's overall budget of $2.4 billion, and Sound Transit maintains the losses are actually lower.

The line is scheduled to open in late 2009.

The audit brings up some recent history. Sound Transit was unable to complete what was promised to voters in 1996: a line from the University District to Seattle-Tacoma International Airport by 2006 for $3.6 billion in current dollars. (Estimates now are $2.7 billion for Westlake Center to the airport by 2009, plus $1.8 billion, including inflation and short-term financing, for a 3-mile tunnel to Husky Stadium by 2016. A First Hill station has been dropped.)

Still, the audit praises the agency for making progress.

"In the last five years, Sound Transit has extensively improved its construction planning and management processes," it says.

The audit is a result of Initiative 900, a Tim Eyman measure passed by state voters two years ago. It was performed by Talbot, Korvola and Warwick of Portland, and released this morning.

It lists 20 "findings," which are suggestions to improve what auditors consider weaknesses in project management.

The strongest criticisms involve environmental problems. In Seattle's Rainier Valley, the agency failed to identify in advance several sites where soil contamination caused $3.5 million in cleanup costs after construction began, the audit says.

Sound Transit disagrees, saying it would have spent much of the cleanup money even if it had located the tainted soils ahead of time.

Auditors also suggested that Sound Transit base its payments to contractors on performance "milestones," as an incentive to reduce the time that traffic and businesses are disrupted by heavy construction. (Work on Martin Luther King Way South is taking at least a year longer than originally planned.)

The audit did not examine how Sound Transit would perform as a transportation system.

Nor did it delve into the proposal to add 50 miles of light rail, as part of Proposition 1 on the Nov. 6 ballot in King, Snohomish and Pierce counties.
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Old October 5th, 2007, 03:28 AM   #1231
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Not exactly good news, but better performance than how these num-nuts (http://www.truthabouttraffic.org/) we're painting ST.
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Old October 5th, 2007, 03:55 AM   #1232
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Not exactly good news, but better performance than how these num-nuts (http://www.truthabouttraffic.org/) we're painting ST.
Actually, if one reads the report (or some of the other reporting on it) instead of the sensationalist papers, you find that it's good news:

http://www.horsesass.org/?p=3526

Sound Transit has made leaps and bounds in maturing and effectively delivering projects, and they're going to keep becoming more effective. It would be nuts to derail them now - we'll just have to start over with another agency later, who will probably have the same problems Sound Transit did to begin with.
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Old October 5th, 2007, 10:58 AM   #1233
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Thanks for that link that you put on the Canada Line theard of the pics you've taken Ben. It looks pretty impressive, and I must say it'll be nice to ride it when I'm in Seattle to avoid all that traffic.

I have quick question approximately what percentage of the line is separated from traffic? I know that some of it is at-grade but does the entire at-grade section run through intersections or are there any overpasses?
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Old October 5th, 2007, 05:43 PM   #1234
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Quote:
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Thanks for that link that you put on the Canada Line theard of the pics you've taken Ben. It looks pretty impressive, and I must say it'll be nice to ride it when I'm in Seattle to avoid all that traffic.

I have quick question approximately what percentage of the line is separated from traffic? I know that some of it is at-grade but does the entire at-grade section run through intersections or are there any overpasses?
I don't know the percentages, but if you look at Google Maps, it runs on Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd with the southernmost crossing at Henderson Street and the northernmost at Alaskan St.

So I think the southernmost crossing is here, and the northernmost here. Looking at Google Maps, I'm actually remembering one more crossing south of Henderson, but I'm not sure where it is.

In that section, the major arterials (or as major as one gets down there) and a few smaller streets have intersections, and there are a few pedestrian crossing points (with lit signs for the peds). The signals are timed for the trains in the peak direction (I don't know how much of this you know). It won't be bad.
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Old October 6th, 2007, 01:28 AM   #1235
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This week's Sound Transit photo of the week illustrates several aspects of the design and construction of the viaduct segments:



The orange overhead girder structure provides temporary support while the viaduct segments are lifted into position. Shear keys are fitted into the pockets in the ends of each set of viaduct segments to keep them in vertical alignment. Once the span is assembled, steel tendons are installed that connect the segments longitudinally. Under bending loads, compressive forces are transmitted through bearing between the concrete segments and tensile forces are transmitted through the steel tendons.
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Old October 6th, 2007, 01:45 AM   #1236
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King County Executive and Sound Transit Board Member Ron Sims has created some controversy with an editorial in the Seattle Times publicly declaring his opposition to the RTID/ST2 ballot measure. This led columnist Danny Westneat to ask the obvious question of why Ron Sims voted with the rest of the Sound Transit board to advance the ballot measure to the public:

==========================================================

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...ronsims27.html

Guest columnist

The roads-and-transit plan: so much cost to do so little
By Ron Sims

Special to The Times

This November, voters must carefully consider the $47 billion regional roads and transit package. This is a momentous decision, with construction scheduled to last 20 years, funded with bonds that won't be fully repaid for 50 years.

While containing some good projects, this plan doesn't solve traffic congestion in the short term, nor does it provide enough long-term relief to justify the financial and environmental costs. Tragically, this plan continues the national policy of ignoring our impacts upon global warming. In a region known for our leadership efforts to reduce greenhouse gases, this plan will actually boost harmful carbon emissions. In its entirety, I regrettably conclude that costs exceed benefits.

If approved, we will see the largest tax increase in state history. Starting in January, car-tab taxes will triple, and the sales tax will be 9.5 percent (10 percent in King County restaurants).

I look at this package with the knowledge that in 50 years, my oldest son will be 80 when it's paid off. My granddaughter will be 55. Their ability to make public investments relevant to their lives and times will be severely limited by this package. Should I be so lucky, I will use my pension until I am 110 years old to pay my share!

The benefits of this package are far from immediate. Even if on schedule, 60 percent of new light rail won't open until 2027. Light rail across Lake Washington is at least 14 years away. The Northgate extension is 11 years away.

The road package is equally back-loaded, with replacement of Highway 520 only partially funded. The 520 funding shortfall is $1.3 billion, even with past gas-tax money and tolls. But the plan still calls for landscaped lids in Medina, the wealthiest neighborhood in our state, financed with regressive taxes on the working poor. When finished, RTID (Regional Transportation Investment District) increases highway capacity by 4.9 percent while traffic is projected to grow eight times faster.

This roads-and-transit plan just doesn't move enough people.

Projected light-rail ridership to Bellevue and Overlake is lackluster because of indirect routing. Traveling from Capitol Hill to the Microsoft campus via downtown Seattle and Mercer Island is slow and cumbersome. The retrofit of Interstate 90 for light rail will slow express-bus service and increase commute times to Issaquah, Sammamish and North Bend.

To the south, we have different inefficiencies. Light rail would connect Seattle to Tacoma (already served by faster Sounder Trains) and run along Highway 99 (where last year's King County Metro "Transit Now" tax increase is ramping up bus-rapid-transit service).

Instead, expanded bus service could generate much higher ridership in this corridor while freeing up funds for light rail to Southcenter and Renton. In Pierce County, we can achieve more traffic relief by extending light rail within Tacoma to the University of Puget Sound and Pacific Lutheran University.

Service to Northgate finally delivers on the promise of light rail. But delay to 2018 is inexcusable; this badly needed segment can and should be built sooner.

Further north, we will probably regret the decision to build along I-5, which limits future development. And, ridership would be higher building from Everett to the south.

We can't afford to wait two decades to do so little. We need a solid transportation plan that moves this region forward with immediate congestion relief.

The package before us does not include solutions like congestion pricing or variable tolls. The goal of congestion pricing is to keep our highways moving efficiently, getting people to work or home in the shortest amount of time. With congestion pricing we would see immediate results.

The private sector is already a tremendous partner, with many employers providing subsidized bus passes and van pools. In concert with congestion pricing, we need to consider remote work sites, telecommuting and other alternatives.

But, the most important option to accompany congestion pricing must be better access to transit. Transit is also critical to the environment.

University of Colorado researchers forecast that the Arctic ice cap will have completely melted by the summer of 2030, shortly after this package is completed. By 2050, around the time we finish paying for this package, two-thirds of the world's polar bears are expected to be extinct.

We must not make transportation decisions without considering the impact on global warming.

I have introduced several initiatives as county executive to combat climate change. We operate the state's largest fleet of biodiesel-fueled buses, and we are pursuing a green-fleet initiative to bring more clean and climate-friendly vehicles to King County. We joined the Chicago Climate Exchange and developed a detailed plan to reduce carbon emissions by 80 percent by 2050. We've preserved more than 100,000 acres of carbon-absorbing forests. But all this progress on global warming would be negated by this plan.

Faced with catastrophic climate change, we need to have courage in our convictions, in our leadership and in our transportation solutions. We must question the environmental implications of our actions.

I commend the Sierra Club, Cascade Bicycle Club and Conservation Northwest for showing great courage in asking these important questions.

This plan is inadequate. We need to refocus on bold solutions that offer immediate relief and a better tomorrow — future generations deserve no less.

Until we have real transportation solutions, I'm a "no" vote.

Ron Sims is the King County executive.
Copyright © 2007 The Seattle Times Company

==========================================================

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/htm...1_danny03.html

Danny Westneat

Take a break, Ron, and give us one
By Danny Westneat

Seattle Times staff columnist

I spent an hour talking to Ron Sims yesterday, and now all I feel is sad.

Sad for him. Sad for the dysfunction of our politics. And sad for the future of this region. Sims is the top-ranked politician in Puget Sound. Last week he announced he's against this fall's big highways and light-rail plan.

Yet if any power broker is responsible for what we're about to vote on, it's Sims.

He is Mr. Light Rail. For a decade he has served on the board that is proposing to add 50 miles of light rail. He appointed nine of 18 members, giving him the most influence of anyone over the rail routes and the taxes to pay for them.

It took three years to create that light-rail plan. Somehow politicians across three counties, from Lakewood in the south to Issaquah in the east up to Edmonds in the north, hashed out something they all agreed on. In April it passed the board unanimously. Including the yes vote of King County Executive Ron Sims.

Except he didn't mean it.

It turns out Sims has felt for at least a year that the light-rail plan is fatally flawed. He says it will take too long to build, costs too much and goes to some of the wrong places.

OK. But why in the world didn't he say something before? Back when it might have done some good?

He says he objected privately. His colleagues say that's news to them. The record shows he voted for every aspect he now decries, from the sales-tax boost to the routes.

"Ron was at the table for the whole thing," says Dave Enslow, the Sumner mayor who has served with Sims on the Sound Transit board since 1997. "Who knows what he was thinking? He sure wasn't saying any of it."

"He never once said to me, 'Hey, I think we need to change course,' " says Dow Constantine, King County Council member and transit-board member.

Sims says he went along for one reason: human weakness. After all the fighting about light rail six years back, Sims says, he was tired. He could no longer hack the slings and arrows.

"Face it, this is not a town that tolerates dissent," Sims says. "I voted for it because I didn't want the hassle of getting beat up. I didn't want to take one more punch."

That meant working on other issues that wouldn't flood his office with nasty calls. And it meant sitting silently by as everyone hashed out a plan he knew he couldn't abide.

I said this story makes me sad. It's true Sims gets a lot of personal abuse, often just for putting up the good fight.

But it also makes me angry. Sims is admitting he abdicated his job. Which was to lead, not shrink from the challenge.

How will we ever solve our transportation mess when the top guy seems so worn out?

Leadership is doing tough work in closed rooms to reach compromises — as Sims himself did to save light rail back in 2001. It isn't harboring private qualms, then detonating a last-minute public bomb.

Now, years of political work may be blown apart. Yes, we'll survive. Especially if we have a strong King County executive to help pick up the pieces.

I admire Ron Sims the man as much as anyone I've met in public life. But if his job makes him this unhappy, maybe it's time to move on.

Danny Westneat's column appears Wednesday and Sunday. Reach him at 206-464-2086 or [email protected].

Copyright © 2007 The Seattle Times Company
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Old October 6th, 2007, 02:06 AM   #1237
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A couple of Sound Transit Announcements

Ride the Lunch Bus

Take a guided tour of Link light rail construction on Sound Transit's Lunch Bus. Tour the Link light rail initial segment followed by lunch at a local eating establishment. You are responsible for buying your own lunch. Tours depart and return at the southwest corner of 5th Ave S & S King Street in the International District. Tours depart at 11:30 a.m. sharp and return by 3 p.m.

Next tour: Friday, October 26, 2007

SODO, Beacon Hill, Rainier Valley, Tukwila and Airport

To RSVP or for more information please contact Wilbert Santos at 206-398-5300 or via e-mail: [email protected]

==========================================================

30% design of the Capital Hill Station is complete. The public was invited to see and comment on the design at an open house on September 26, 2007. The slideshow presentation is now available for viewing online.

See the slideshow and submit your feedback>>>

http://www.soundtransit.org/Document...HOpenHouse.pdf

Learn more about University Link>>>

http://www.soundtransit.org/x1698.xml
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Old October 6th, 2007, 05:14 AM   #1238
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nice. lets hope the "tod" materializes quickly and looks good.

man 9 minutes from the uw.. awesome.
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Old October 6th, 2007, 09:14 PM   #1239
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Also, does anyone know why the bus tunnel is closed on weekends? It's just confusing and doens't really appear to have much purpose, other than saving money I guess.

And, will the busses run 20 hours/day and on weekends when light rail service starts?
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Old October 6th, 2007, 09:25 PM   #1240
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Quote:
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Also, does anyone know why the bus tunnel is closed on weekends? It's just confusing and doens't really appear to have much purpose, other than saving money I guess.

And, will the busses run 20 hours/day and on weekends when light rail service starts?
i believe it is closed because of light rail testing, closing the tunnel was gradual, so opening might be too
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