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Old June 15th, 2007, 07:12 PM   #61
unvrsty07
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This is only worthy to beput on here because it is the FIRST one in the nation to do so... And thank god!!

Smoking banned at Indy airport

The Indianapolis International Airport board voted unanimously today to make the airport smoke-free by Jan. 1.

The only exception will the construction site of the new terminal, though that area will become smoke-free by no later than Sept. 30, 2008, or as soon as that building is enclosed.

Contracts on the project allow for smoking by construction workers and would be costly and difficult to rework, so the board opted to make the exception rather than make the entire facility a smoke-free zone.

“By implementing this ordinance, you will be making a commitment to the health of your employees and this community,” Dr. Virginia Caine, director of the Marion County Health Department, told the nine-member board before the vote.

The airport will be the first in the U.S. to ban smoking on all its property, meaning smokers wouldn’t be able to walk outside to have a cigarette.

The new policy will affect not only passengers, but also people who work at the airport, from Transportation Security Administration TSA officials to concessionaires to pilots.
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Old June 18th, 2007, 12:38 PM   #62
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Interesting story, particularly as the initial site plan put on the Fishers web site looked like it contained a lot of generic retail boxes.

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dl...0102/706180386

June 18, 2007

No big box in project, Fishers official vows
By John Tuohy
john.tuohy@indystar.com

FISHERS, Ind. -- An Ohio firm chosen to develop a new $100 million downtown here is embroiled in a lawsuit in a Virginia town after officials there learned a Wal-Mart had unexpectedly been added to plans for a quaint downtown.
The project
• What: Fishers Town Center.
• Where: Off 116th Street, east of Town Hall and west of I-69.
• The early plan: Fifteen businesses, 28 luxury homes, 40 loft-style condos, 22 townhouses; outdoor pavilion with leafy walkways; adult education campus; high-concept children's playground.

"They never said big box," said Chris Lawrence, an assistant to the Blacksburg, Va., town manager, a contention that developer Fairmount Properties disputes.

"The ideas being illustrated had nothing to do with big box."

Blacksburg, like Fishers, was anticipating a pedestrian-friendly mix of specialty shops, restaurants and homes. But when Fairmount submitted its site plan nearly a year after getting a zoning change to move the project forward, a 186,000-square-foot Wal-Mart was included.

Now, Blacksburg and Fairmount are suing each other, and the Town Council has passed an ordinance that could kill the proposed Wal-Mart and cripple the project.

The developer, which specializes in rebuilding struggling downtowns, said it has no plans for a big-box retailer for Fishers.

"Fishers doesn't need a big box," said Randy Ruttenberg, the principal of Fairmount. "It would be way out of context."

Fishers Town Council President Scott Faultless said he wasn't troubled by the Blacksburg case.

"It doesn't concern me," Faultless said. "It is a zoning dispute, and that is a local matter. There will be plenty of time (for us) to scrutinize them. We will get copies of all their other development agreements and look at them."

The Blacksburg plan

When Fairmount pitched its plan, called "First and Main," to Blacksburg's Town Council about a year ago, it was as if Norman Rockwell had taken pen to paper.

"Upscale and fun," wrote the firm. "A variety of delightful public spaces . . . excitement and an active setting for retail and commercial activity."
Fairmount has built a solid reputation for turning blighted areas into vital living and shopping districts. The firm has completed 17 projects in the Midwest and is recognized for its work in the "new urbanism" movement.

"They had a good reputation, and they've done some beautiful things," said David Britt of Citizens First for Blacksburg, a local government watchdog group. "We thought we had a good thing going. What was not to like?"

The Blacksburg Town Council approved a zoning change in May 2006 that would allow Fairmount to move forward with a plan for 40 acres of stores, townhouses and condos "for active adults, retirees and young professionals."
In March, however, Fairmount submitted a site plan that included a "major retailer" instead of homes.

Many citizens felt betrayed, and the council unanimously passed an ordinance May 30 that would limit retail buildings to 80,000 square feet without special permission by the council.

"No one on the Town Council imagined they would do this," said Dan Breslau, president of Blacksburg United for Responsible Growth, a group formed to fight the big box. "What they described and what they have in the current site plan are not the same thing."

Fairmount filed a lawsuit against the town even before the ordinance passed, asking a circuit court judge to declare it illegal. The company maintains that the rezoning granted by the town a year earlier clearly gives it the right to build a giant retailer.

"There was no limitation on size," Ruttenberg said. "We believe we are delivering precisely what we said we would deliver."

Further, he said, company officials mentioned the possibility of a large retailer on several occasions.

But Lawrence said he can't remember anyone from Fairmount doing so.
Lawrence and others who oppose the Wal-Mart deal say it was a mistake to rely on fuzzy artist's renderings and general descriptions before entering development agreements.

"You need to be sure that the zoning we have in place is what we really want," Lawrence said. The renderings, he said, "give the impression that this is what you will get, though they are non-binding."

Breslau said the council should have been more careful. "Obviously they left it too open ended," he said.

Fishers in early stage

Fishers has not yet reached the point of zoning land for its project.

Its Town Council has not taken any formal action on its downtown plan except to adopt a resolution supporting Fairmount's proposal.

The company outlined a complex of small shops and restaurants, pricey townhomes and lofts, and walking trails and parkland.

About 125 mostly older homes and front porch businesses east of the Municipal Center off 116th Street would need to be bought and destroyed to clear the land. No homes have been purchased, and no zoning change has been requested.

Ruttenberg said there are major differences between the Blacksburg and Fishers projects, most of them economic. Fishers is more affluent, is located near a major highway and already has a number of large retailers nearby.
"Blacksburg doesn't have the demographics to support only small retail shops," he said. "The idea of a large retailer is to drive people to the project. Fishers doesn't need that."

Faultless said the council was too experienced with large-scale development, and too careful, to get blindsided by a loophole that would allow something unwanted to slip through.

"There will not be a big box here," he said. "We will examine size, landscaping, elevation. We will have a very specific agreement."
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Old June 20th, 2007, 02:24 AM   #63
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New Hotel in Plainfield

From the IndyStar:

One of the newest hotel concepts for the hip, upscale and tech-oriented traveler is under construction in Plainfield.

Cambria Suites, the latest brand from Maryland-based Choice Hotels, is going up in the rapidly growing cluster of hotels and extended stay lodges at Ind. 267 and I-70 on the southern edge of Plainfield.

The interchange already has nearly 900 hotel rooms, with at least three more new hotels proposed for construction plus expansion plans announced for an existing Holiday Inn Express.

The area is booming with hotels because it is minutes from the new $1 billion passenger terminal going up at Indianapolis International Airport. And it is surrounded by the 25 million square feet of office and distribution centers in Plainfield, which draw a steady stream of business travelers.

The Cambria Suites hotel, a $9 million development, will be a four-story, 103-suite facility including a casual dining and gathering area with a full barista coffee bar and 24-hour food service for guests.

It also has a state-of-the-art fitness center and resort-style indoor swimming pool with an outdoor patio. The plans also show a 24-hour-a-day convenience store with freshly prepared salads and sandwiches and similar fare.

The hotel will be owned by Evergreen Motor Lodges, which also owns Super 8 and Wingate hotels nearby on Gateway Drive, also on the northwest corner of the I-70 and Ind. 267 interchange.

“We are very excited to be building a Cambria Suites hotel in Plainfield for both the business and leisure travelers looking for stylish suites, amenities and services,” said Evergreen Vice President Venkatta Nattam.

Among the niche markets he hopes to tap will be the airline flight crews on overnight stays.

“Cambria can be a full-service hotel with food services at all hours, like the flight crews require. None of the other hotels in Plainfield have that service at this time so the pilots are going to hotels downtown,” Nattam said Monday.

Relocation of the airport’s main entrance toward the Plainfield interchange with I-70 means “the airport is coming toward us. And Plainfield is growing very fast,” he said.

Cambria is the newest and most expensive brand from Choice Hotels, which has more than 5,300 locations and more than 435,000 rooms in the U.S. and 40 countries and territories. Another 860 hotels are under development including approximately 50 Cambria Suites, said Heather Soule, spokeswoman for Choice.

The first Cambria Suites opened last April in Boise, Idaho, and the second will be in Green Bay, Wis., in August.

Another Cambria Suites is planned in the Indianapolis metro region at Exit 10 off I-69, in the Saxony development of homes, retailing, business and medical facilities booming in Fishers and Noblesville. It is due to open by early 2009.

Typical rates are in the $99- to $150-a-night range.

“Much like the location close to the Indianapolis airport, we have another Cambria Suites going up near Baltimore International,” she said. “These are targeted to the Generation X business and leisure travelers looking for high speed wired and wireless (Internet) connections and two flat panel televisions and MP3 player jacks in every room.”

“This is a lifestyle hotel. In Plainfield, it is also close to the Metropolis lifestyle mall,” she added.

Soule said the Cambria Suites concept is focused on the young, hip lifestyle with an emphasis on technology that is amazing.

That’s a little different from the other Choice brands that focus on price, including Comfort Inn, Quality Inn, Sleep Inn, Econo Lodge, Rodeway Inn and MainStay Suites.

“Travelers who expect their hotel to reflect their lifestyle from upscale amenities and stylish surroundings to contemporary food and beverage, will feel at home at the Cambria Suites,” said William Edmundson, vice president of Choice.
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Old June 20th, 2007, 02:27 AM   #64
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I fully expect Plainfield to turn into the west side's Carmel. The airport expansion and the outer beltway are going to bring and have brought a lot of development and jobs to the city. The city is expanding its trail system and with the increase in tax revenues, I anticipate Plainfield trying to develop a true downtown like Carmel.
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Old June 20th, 2007, 10:03 AM   #65
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I am not sold on moving streets away from the Speedway. One of the great charms of that facility is that it is basically plopped down in the middle of the neighborhood. Making it more standoffish like a typical modern stadium surrounded by acres of parking would be a step backwards, IMO.

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dl...storiesrecache



June 20, 2007

Speedway's drive to revitalize
Plan would shift 16th Street, add 2 roundabouts

By Josh Duke
josh.duke@indystar.com

Speedway arose as the vision of four auto industry pioneers nearly 100 years ago.

Pictured: Preliminary plans for an overhaul of the area around the Indianapolis Motor Speedway would put a roundabout at the three-way intersection of Crawfordsville Road with 16th and Main streets. - Rendering provided by American Structurepoint Inc
CHANGING SPEEDWAY
Here are key elements of the Speedway redevelopment plan announced Tuesday:

• Connect 16th and Main streets with Crawfordsville Road, creating a new intersection with a roundabout at the southwest corner of the track.

• Reroute 16th Street southeast along an old rail line to create a second roundabout at Holt Road.

• Create a campuslike setting adjacent to the track with racing-related tourist attractions, possibly including the Indianapolis Motor Speedway museum.

• Establish a Downtown atmosphere with multistory residential and retail buildings on each side of Main Street.

• Form an industrial area near 10th Street and Holt Road to attract racing-related businesses.

TOWN OF SPEEDWAY AT A GLANCE

Location: About five miles northwest of Downtown Indianapolis, in western Marion County.

• History: Laid out a few years after the 1909 opening of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway by four automobile-industry entrepreneurs: James Allison, Carl Fisher, Arthur Newby and Frank Wheeler. Incorporated in 1926 and grew rapidly through industrialization during World War II.

• Government: Run by a five-member town council. John McCurtain is town manager.

• Population: 12,881.

• Ethnicity: White, 83.2 percent; black, 11.9 percent.

• High school diploma or higher: 88 percent.

• Bachelor's degree or higher: 22.4 percent.

• Median household income: $37,713.

• Median home value: $98,700.

• Major employers: Speedway Community Schools; Indianapolis Motor Speedway; Praxair; Allison Transmission.

Sources: 2000 U.S. census; Star archives

Now, town leaders hope to embark on a new direction that calls for moving major streets, bringing in more retail and industry, and creating a racing-related theme to draw tourists and businesses.

"When (Speedway founder) Carl Fisher laid out his design for a 21/2-mile track and automotive industrial area here, I'm sure it was a bold concept at the time that people probably laughed at and never thought would succeed," said Speedway Redevelopment Commission President Scott Harris.

"After another 70 years, we have another bold vision."
Harris said the proposed road improvements alone could cost at least $20 million. Town officials hope to foster public-private funding but say they could sell bonds.

The public will be allowed to comment on the proposal at a redevelopment commission meeting in late July. Pending commission approval, any final decision would then be made by the five-member Town Council. Town leaders hope to have many of the changes in place by 2011, for the 100th anniversary of the 500-Mile Race.

The plan, in development for more than two years, has drawn wide support from the Town Council and area businesses, including the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

Speedway's plan is the latest in a series of major improvements announced recently by Central Indiana communities. Within the past five weeks, Fishers proposed a new, $100 million town center that would include an outdoor pavilion, businesses and homes, while Greenwood unveiled plans to attract a 125,000-square-foot Cabela's outfitter.

On Tuesday, Speedway officials and planners from American Structurepoint showed more than 800 residents and business owners gathered at Speedway High School the master plan for 350 acres south of the racetrack.

Town officials launched the plan to overhaul the town's decaying Main Street, which has seen an exodus of businesses in recent decades, and to compete with cities such as Charlotte, N.C., and Daytona, Fla., for racing tourism dollars.

The most dramatic changes in Speedway's plan call for rerouting major streets and overhauling the business district along Main Street.

The intersection of 16th Street with Crawfordsville and Georgetown roads would be moved slightly northwest to form a new roundabout that aligns with Main Street.

Planners also are calling for changes to Georgetown, in part because of concerns raised by the Department of Homeland Security. The most likely option would be to close the road between 16th and 25th streets, opening it to pedestrian traffic only.

The plan also suggests shifting 16th Street to the southeast, eventually meeting Holt Road in a second roundabout.

The space where 16th Street currently touches the track complex would be converted into a campuslike setting for racing-related tourist attractions, including the possibility of moving the Indianapolis Motor Speedway museum to a more prominent location outside the track or adding a hotel or conference center.

Harris said IMS owns most of that land and would control its future.
"We are working with them and exchanging ideas of what that might be," Harris said. "They are very much on board with this. It would provide them with an opportunity they've never had."

IMS President Joie Chitwood, who attended Tuesday's unveiling, would not go into specifics about the land but said the track backs the town's plan.
"We support them, and we look forward to being a part of this future," he said. "We are excited to see what this could become."

The plan also highlights sidewalks along major thoroughfares to make the area more pedestrian-friendly. Paths designed to handle bicycle and in-line skate traffic would tie into the area's trail system.

The business district along Main Street would undergo major changes, with the hope of creating a thriving area similar to Downtown Indianapolis. Plans call for multistory buildings on each side of the street with both retail and residential uses.

The southeast corner of the development between Polco Street and Holt Road would be designated for racing-related industry. Planners hope to entice racing teams or manufacturers. Harris said some already are interested.

"We've had significant discussions with two Indy Racing teams, one already located in Indianapolis and the other out of town," he said. "They have seen the plans and are very excited."
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Old June 20th, 2007, 02:37 PM   #66
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I have always felt that the Speedway area has been under utilized. It really has the potential to be a major tourist area year around.
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Old June 20th, 2007, 06:57 PM   #67
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Arenn, I understand your concern about shifting 16th street away from the southside of the track. But where are you finding that there will be massive parking lots surrounding the track? I thought the point of moving 16th street was to build mixed use buildings around a public plaza.
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Old June 20th, 2007, 08:36 PM   #68
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I was looking at the aerial renderings ablerock posted in the main Indy thread. I may have mis-interpreted them, however.
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Old June 21st, 2007, 03:35 AM   #69
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I love the plan. BUILD IT BUILD IT BUILD IT!!!!
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Old June 22nd, 2007, 03:35 PM   #70
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I love the vision the Town of Speedway has! I really hope they get the support of the MDC and the planning staff downtown. If so, yes, this will do wonders for that area!
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Old June 23rd, 2007, 04:53 PM   #71
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I recently found out that the state doesn't plan to widen I-69 from SR 37 to SR238 until 2016!! That is CRAZY!! Saxony will be online in 3-4 years and the amount of traffic on that stretch of the interstate will EXPLODE!!

The state can't afford to wait until five years AFTER Saxony comes on line to widen that portion of the interstate.

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Old June 25th, 2007, 03:58 PM   #72
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoosier View Post
I recently found out that the state doesn't plan to widen I-69 from SR 37 to SR238 until 2016!! That is CRAZY!! Saxony will be online in 3-4 years and the amount of traffic on that stretch of the interstate will EXPLODE!!

The state can't afford to wait until five years AFTER Saxony comes on line to widen that portion of the interstate.


Some of you may recall I am from Anderson originally. I headed up to A-town on Sunday at 12:30 and went right up I-69. The traffic was horrible; bumper to bumper and I never went faster than 65MPH from Casleton to Anderson. They desperately need to add 2 additional lanes each direction, at a minimum, long before 2016! With the new Hamilton Town Centre at Exit 10, the northeast corridors largest subdivision, Summer Lake at Exit 13, Pendleton booming at Exit 19, and the ENORMOUS Nestle Plant at Exit 22. This is all before Anderson's busiest exit at Exit 26 and then Chesterfield-Daleville; Anderson-Muncie at Exit 32.
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Old June 25th, 2007, 10:14 PM   #73
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Related to the recent Speedway revitalization announcement:

From the June 22 Indianapolis Star

19 acres in Speedway set for development

By Bruce C. Smith

A little-noticed, 19-acre site on the western edge of Speedway near the I-465 interchange at Crawfordsville Road has a new owner with plans for a development of hotels, retailing and motorsports businesses.

Brent Benge, managing partner of Crawfordsville Road Partners LLC, said today the group of local investors has closed on the purchase of the land on the southeast corner of the interchange of I-465 and Crawfordsville Road.
The heavily wooded site is behind a Marsh grocery store shopping center on Crawfordsville Road. And Eagle Creek borders the southside of the property.
The site is outside of the Speedway town limits and it is already zoned by Indianapolis for retailing and motorsports.

But Benge, who graduated from Speedway High School in 1996, said the developers intend to coordinate their project with the town’s plans announced this week for a dramatic redevelopment of the 16th Street and Crawfordsville area around the Indianapolis Motor Speedway.

“Our site is perfectly situated to appeal to motorsports businesses between the Indianapolis Motor Speedway and O’Reilly Raceway Park,” he said.

“It also makes perfect sense as the site for hotels and other businesses that would want to be at the gateway and the main entrance to the greatest city in the world for motorsports,” Benge said.

Ross Reller, vice president of Meridian Real Estate which will help market the site for development, said it also will benefit from the state’s reconstruction of the interchange.

The Indiana Department of Transportation has a multi-year project dubbed Accelerate 465 underway to widen the western leg of the city’s outer belt and to rebuild the main interchanges including the Speedway exit.

“It has been confusing and sometimes dangerous with I-465, Crawfordsville Road, High School, Debonair Lane, and U.S. 136 all coming together,” he said. “That will be improved by InDOT’s announced plans to rebuild the interchange over the next several years.”

“And the effect of the state’s plans to extend High School southward will give us a direct driveway into the site,” he added.

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Old June 26th, 2007, 12:57 AM   #74
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cwilson758 View Post
Some of you may recall I am from Anderson originally. I headed up to A-town on Sunday at 12:30 and went right up I-69. The traffic was horrible; bumper to bumper and I never went faster than 65MPH from Casleton to Anderson. They desperately need to add 2 additional lanes each direction, at a minimum, long before 2016! With the new Hamilton Town Centre at Exit 10, the northeast corridors largest subdivision, Summer Lake at Exit 13, Pendleton booming at Exit 19, and the ENORMOUS Nestle Plant at Exit 22. This is all before Anderson's busiest exit at Exit 26 and then Chesterfield-Daleville; Anderson-Muncie at Exit 32.
Truer words have never been spoken. INDOt has a severe case of myopia when it comes to designing and funding road projects. That portion of I-69 should have been widened 10 years ago in anticipation of future development.
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Old June 28th, 2007, 06:35 PM   #75
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Avon gathers ideas for U.S. 36 corridor

AVON -- Town officials, business owners and residents said Wednesday they hope to avoid a future of heavy traffic, busy signage and sterile strip mall construction along Avon's major roadway, U.S. 36.


Avon Planning Director Christine Owens Wednesday led a meeting to generate ideas for building guidelines, known as an overlay district, for the section of the highway within the town's limits. The guidelines would set standards for building architecture and landscape in the district.
About 15 people attended the Town Hall meeting. Participants said they liked the use of landscaping, decorative lighting and crosswalks, but they disliked busy signage, strip center layouts and giant parking lots.
"When you own a business you want to make sure your sign is out there," said Dawn Eising, who owns the Subway on the much-traveled roadway. "U.S. 36 is a busy thoroughfare, so people only have a few seconds to see that sign. From a residential standpoint, people who live here, they don't want the buildings to be billboards."
Those at the meeting brainstormed ideas that were straightforward, such as reducing traffic flow and improving communication with the Indiana Department of Transportation. Other ideas were more imaginative.
"I would like to see 36 with a monorail system going all the way to Danville and to Indianapolis, with a spike to the airport," said Joe Shimrock, an Avon resident who owns property along U.S. 36.
Owens said she hopes to have a draft of the committee's goals completed by Aug. 22 for a public workshop and finalized by September for possible adoption by the Town Council.
The committee will meet again at 7 p.m. on July 18 in the Avon Town Hall building.




Um...this is about 15 years too late!
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Old June 29th, 2007, 12:38 AM   #76
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I think Beech Grove is an underappreciated local community.

http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dl...8/1195/LOCAL18

June 28, 2007

City milestone
Ceremony in Beech Grove during annual Freedom Fest will officially reopen Emerson, showcasing new 'gateway'

By Jason Thomas
jason.thomas@indystar.com

In April 2006 it was sledgehammers. This time it will be scissors.

Work continued Tuesday on the northbound lanes of Emerson Avenue as part of Beech Grove's $7 million gateway project. This phase should be completed by mid-July. - Jason Thomas / The Star
Two springs ago, Beech Grove Mayor Joe Wright used a sledgehammer to signal the beginning of the Emerson Avenue redevelopment project .

On Saturday, he will use a pair of scissors to cut a ribbon that will officially reopen the thoroughfare and showcase a new gateway to the city.

"The thing I think back to is when I took a sledgehammer to the wall," said Wright, remembering a 3-foot, more-than-30-year-old concrete barrier that cut off downtown Beech Grove from Emerson.

"Now we're cutting the ribbon on a project on June 30 that has just exceeded my expectations and I think even the community's expectations."

Saturday's events are part of the city's Freedom Fest celebration, which includes a full day of free activities.

The wall is long gone. In its place is a beautified Emerson Avenue with two "centennial towers" standing sentry on either side of Main Street, on the west side of Emerson, welcoming visitors into the city's downtown shopping district.

Capping Saturday's ceremony is the dedication of a small park at Garstang Street and Emerson honoring military veterans and public safety officials.
By mid-July, three granite monuments will be erected at the park: One will salute the five military branches; one will recognize public safety; and another will honor the city's three police officers killed in the line of duty.

"It's a dedication to those defending our freedoms at home and abroad," Wright said.

Three flagpoles already are in place at the park site, flying United States and Indiana flags, and flags honoring the military and public safety.

The entire Emerson Avenue project stretches from Albany Street to Elmwood Avenue, just north of I-465.

The first part, called the corridor phase, which will be celebrated Saturday, is the project's aesthetic portion. Other features include a landscaped median, enhanced lighting and a wrought-iron fence atop a freshly painted concrete wall on the east side of Emerson that abuts the Amtrak facility.

The city spent $2 million on the project, while the federal government and the Indiana Department of Transportation kicked in $5.5 million.

"All in all, it needed to be done," said Frank Mascari, owner of Spalding Jewelry on Main Street, and the Democratic candidate for mayor. "It's overkill. It's pretty exhorbitant, as you can tell."

Work yet to be done includes putting finishing touches on light fixtures and applying a final layer of asphalt. Wright expects it to be finished by mid-July.

The project's second phase, from Churchman to Elmwood avenues, is expected to be complete in September, according to Wright.

The mayor touted Emerson as the first of eight redevelopment projects, which he says will make the city more walkable and business-oriented.

"I think this has tremendous meaning in the fact that we're moving forward," Wright said. "It's a drastic change and sets the stage for what's to come."
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Old June 29th, 2007, 02:45 AM   #77
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Avon gathers ideas for U.S. 36 corridor


Um...this is about 15 years too late!
Would you expect anything more from Indiana governments?

The most critical needs for US 36 are a bypass around Danville and widening to six lanes from SR 267 to I-465.
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Old July 8th, 2007, 03:39 PM   #78
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http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dl...0/1015/LOCAL01

IIRC Carmel has talked about a full buildout in the 100,000 range too. It will be interesting to see what happens in 2025 when Fishers is full. Will it start seeing the same suburban decay that has hit a lot of Marion County? Time will tell.

What I found interesting is that 14 of the top 20 fastest growing municipalities in Indiana are in Indianapolis. Of the remaining six, only one, Lake County's St. John with a population of ~11,000, is over 5,000 in population.

Town's population zooms on state list

By John Tuohy
john.tuohy@indystar.com

Fishers isn't just climbing up the state's population chart, it's soaring.

Fishers' population -- now estimated at 61,840 -- could reach 120,000 by 2025, when developments could run out of land. - Rich Miller / The Star 2003 file photo

The state's ninth-largest community, like an express elevator, is whizzing past Hoosier towns that have been stuck on the same floors for years.
Analysts say by the time Fishers is finished growing -- as in no more room for new subdivisions -- it could rank as the third or fourth most populous municipality in the state.

"It has the potential, if its development estimates are accurate, to give Evansville a run for its money in third place in the next couple of decades," said John Stafford, director of the Community Research Institute at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne.

Not only is Fishers the state's second-fastest-growing community since 2000, but seven of eight cities larger than it have lost residents since then.
"And some of those cities can't grow much more because they are boxed in geographically," Stafford said.

With an estimated population of 61,840, Fishers is only 3,447 residents behind the eighth-ranked city, Muncie, and 7,407 people behind Bloomington, ranked seventh.

Evansville, the state's third-biggest city at 115,738, has lost nearly 6,000 people since 2000. Six other cities larger than Fishers have also lost residents since 2000 -- Fort Wayne, South Bend, Gary, Hammond, Bloomington and Muncie. Only Indianapolis gained population.

Fishers officials predict that when it is completely built out in about 2025, its population will be about 120,000, making it the state's third-largest city.
Since the 2000 census, the town has moved up fast in population, passing Lafayette, Carmel, Anderson, Terre Haute, Elkhart, Mishawaka, Lawrence and Columbus.

If Fishers were to continue to grow at the current rate -- 38 percent since 2000 -- it would reach a population of 85,339 by 2012, ranking it in fifth place, ahead of Hammond (78,292) and behind Gary (97,715).

Muncie Deputy Mayor Phyllis Amburn said that city's 5 percent population drop in the last six years is mostly because big factories like Borg-Warner have closed, costing hundreds of jobs. Many other residents have moved west of the city limits to Yorktown.

Amburn said officials there are well aware that Fishers may pass them in population.

"It's quite possible they'll do it soon," she said.

Stafford said residents in many Indiana cities are choosing to live in the suburbs, and the average household size in those cities is decreasing. "There are more elderly people living alone or single people in those households."
Carmel, which Fishers passed in population estimates in 2006, is still growing at a brisk 15.9 percent, but is no longer among the state's 20 fastest-growing cities and towns.

But Carmel's population could rise significantly in a short time. The Indiana Supreme Court recently cleared the way for Carmel to annex property in southwest Clay Township where 10,000 people live.

Where Fishers ranks

Indiana's most populous cities in July 2006 and the percentage of change since 2000.

1. Indianapolis, 785,597, 0.5.
2. Fort Wayne, 248,637, - 0.6.
3. Evansville, 115,738, - 5.0.
4. South Bend, 104,905, - 3.3.
5. Gary, 97,715, - 5.1.
6. Hammond, 78,292, - 6.1.
7. Bloomington, 69,247, - 3.5.
8. Muncie, 65,287, - 4.2.
9. Fishers, 61,840, 38.5.
10. Lafayette, 61,244, - 0.05.
11. Carmel, 60,570, 15.9.
12. Anderson, 57,496, - 3.9.
13. Terre Haute, 57,259, - 4.1.
14. Elkhart, 52,748, 0.5.
15. Mishawaka, 48,912, 4.6.
16. Kokomo, 45,923, - 1.4.
17. Greenwood, 44,767, 18.7.
18. Lawrence, 41,791, 6.9.
19. Noblesville, 40,115, 27.5.
20. Columbus , 39,690,s 1.6.

How fast we're growing

The populations of the fastest-growing Indiana cities and towns and the rate of increase since April 2000.

1. Winfield, 3,809, 46.8.
2. Fishers, 61,840, 38.5.
3. New Palestine, 2,014, 37.2.
4. Kempton, 572, 33.6.
5. Pittsboro, 2,386, 33.5.
6. Whitestown, 687, 30.4.
7. Noblesville, 40,115, 27.5.
8. St. John, 11,710, 27.1.
9. Westfield, 13,444, 26.8.
10. Ingalls, 1,585, 25.7.
11. Plainfield, 24,734, 25.1.
12. Burns Harbor, 1,015, 24.7.
13. Zionsville, 12,352, 22.7.
14. Brownsburg, 18,850, 22.3.
15. Avon, 9,847, 22.2.
16. Georgetown, 2,768, 19.0.
17. DeMotte, 4,013, 18.9.
18. Greenwood, 44,767, 18.7.
19. Bargersville, 2,576, 17.7.
20. Danville, 7,827, 17.5.
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Old July 8th, 2007, 04:55 PM   #79
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Fishers' growth is mind-boggling. 38.5%??!!

One of the benefits of such high growth is the inevitability of higher density development, such as Riverplace. In the next ten years, I expect several more mid/high-rise residential projects proposed and hopefully built in Fishers.

Also, the state will be FORCED to upgrade I-69 and SR 37 to accomodate the increased traffic.
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Old July 9th, 2007, 02:57 PM   #80
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arenn View Post
http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dl...0/1015/LOCAL01

IIRC Carmel has talked about a full buildout in the 100,000 range too. It will be interesting to see what happens in 2025 when Fishers is full. Will it start seeing the same suburban decay that has hit a lot of Marion County? Time will tell.

What I found interesting is that 14 of the top 20 fastest growing municipalities in Indiana are in Indianapolis. Of the remaining six, only one, Lake County's St. John with a population of ~11,000, is over 5,000 in population.

Town's population zooms on state list

By John Tuohy
john.tuohy@indystar.com

Fishers isn't just climbing up the state's population chart, it's soaring.

Fishers' population -- now estimated at 61,840 -- could reach 120,000 by 2025, when developments could run out of land. - Rich Miller / The Star 2003 file photo

The state's ninth-largest community, like an express elevator, is whizzing past Hoosier towns that have been stuck on the same floors for years.
Analysts say by the time Fishers is finished growing -- as in no more room for new subdivisions -- it could rank as the third or fourth most populous municipality in the state.

"It has the potential, if its development estimates are accurate, to give Evansville a run for its money in third place in the next couple of decades," said John Stafford, director of the Community Research Institute at Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne.

Not only is Fishers the state's second-fastest-growing community since 2000, but seven of eight cities larger than it have lost residents since then.
"And some of those cities can't grow much more because they are boxed in geographically," Stafford said.

With an estimated population of 61,840, Fishers is only 3,447 residents behind the eighth-ranked city, Muncie, and 7,407 people behind Bloomington, ranked seventh.

Evansville, the state's third-biggest city at 115,738, has lost nearly 6,000 people since 2000. Six other cities larger than Fishers have also lost residents since 2000 -- Fort Wayne, South Bend, Gary, Hammond, Bloomington and Muncie. Only Indianapolis gained population.

Fishers officials predict that when it is completely built out in about 2025, its population will be about 120,000, making it the state's third-largest city.
Since the 2000 census, the town has moved up fast in population, passing Lafayette, Carmel, Anderson, Terre Haute, Elkhart, Mishawaka, Lawrence and Columbus.

If Fishers were to continue to grow at the current rate -- 38 percent since 2000 -- it would reach a population of 85,339 by 2012, ranking it in fifth place, ahead of Hammond (78,292) and behind Gary (97,715).

Muncie Deputy Mayor Phyllis Amburn said that city's 5 percent population drop in the last six years is mostly because big factories like Borg-Warner have closed, costing hundreds of jobs. Many other residents have moved west of the city limits to Yorktown.

Amburn said officials there are well aware that Fishers may pass them in population.

"It's quite possible they'll do it soon," she said.

Stafford said residents in many Indiana cities are choosing to live in the suburbs, and the average household size in those cities is decreasing. "There are more elderly people living alone or single people in those households."
Carmel, which Fishers passed in population estimates in 2006, is still growing at a brisk 15.9 percent, but is no longer among the state's 20 fastest-growing cities and towns.

But Carmel's population could rise significantly in a short time. The Indiana Supreme Court recently cleared the way for Carmel to annex property in southwest Clay Township where 10,000 people live.

Where Fishers ranks

Indiana's most populous cities in July 2006 and the percentage of change since 2000.

1. Indianapolis, 785,597, 0.5.
2. Fort Wayne, 248,637, - 0.6.
3. Evansville, 115,738, - 5.0.
4. South Bend, 104,905, - 3.3.
5. Gary, 97,715, - 5.1.
6. Hammond, 78,292, - 6.1.
7. Bloomington, 69,247, - 3.5.
8. Muncie, 65,287, - 4.2.
9. Fishers, 61,840, 38.5.
10. Lafayette, 61,244, - 0.05.
11. Carmel, 60,570, 15.9.
12. Anderson, 57,496, - 3.9.
13. Terre Haute, 57,259, - 4.1.
14. Elkhart, 52,748, 0.5.
15. Mishawaka, 48,912, 4.6.
16. Kokomo, 45,923, - 1.4.
17. Greenwood, 44,767, 18.7.
18. Lawrence, 41,791, 6.9.
19. Noblesville, 40,115, 27.5.
20. Columbus , 39,690,s 1.6.

How fast we're growing

The populations of the fastest-growing Indiana cities and towns and the rate of increase since April 2000.

1. Winfield, 3,809, 46.8.
2. Fishers, 61,840, 38.5.
3. New Palestine, 2,014, 37.2.
4. Kempton, 572, 33.6.
5. Pittsboro, 2,386, 33.5.
6. Whitestown, 687, 30.4.
7. Noblesville, 40,115, 27.5.
8. St. John, 11,710, 27.1.
9. Westfield, 13,444, 26.8.
10. Ingalls, 1,585, 25.7.
11. Plainfield, 24,734, 25.1.
12. Burns Harbor, 1,015, 24.7.
13. Zionsville, 12,352, 22.7.
14. Brownsburg, 18,850, 22.3.
15. Avon, 9,847, 22.2.
16. Georgetown, 2,768, 19.0.
17. DeMotte, 4,013, 18.9.
18. Greenwood, 44,767, 18.7.
19. Bargersville, 2,576, 17.7.
20. Danville, 7,827, 17.5.
When I was in high school in Anderson, I was on the Mayor's City Youth Council (yes, I was a nerd then too). In 1970, Anderson had a population of 80,000 people, making it #8 in the State. In 1980, that had dropped to 75,000 and now it is 57,000. I mention this because when I was on the MCYC, I was able to look at my first comprehensive plan and long range projections and they were for Anderson in 2000. It was projected that the City would have 120,000 people and would stretch to the Madison-Henry County lines. It's sad because the City has the infrastructure for a City twice the size, and it is becoming very expensive for the residents to maintain.
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