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Old February 4th, 2014, 08:11 AM   #1701
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I always get a little confused as to the before and after situations when they describe them like that. I'd much prefer if there were diagrams, including notes on points of conflict for the lines. Add an explicit trains-per-hour table too. THEN it'd be a great article about what seems to be a nice improvement.
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Old February 5th, 2014, 03:14 AM   #1702
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However the article, being from a trade publication, does offer more information than the typical mainstream media feature (dismal that...).

Incredibly, even the wiki entry for this railway station lacks a rudimentary track diagram, I had to go to the National Rail website to get a diagram of the platform arrangement (pre-renovation, mind you- even that hasn't been updated). I was initially confused by the British usage of the term "platform"- it actually refers to the platform face abutting a track, in Japan we use track numbers as the equivalent.
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Old February 5th, 2014, 06:59 PM   #1703
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Today:

Quote:
http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/i...d-by-2021.html

Heathrow Airport western rail link could be completed by 2021
05 Feb 2014



UK: Infrastructure manager Network Rail announced on February 5 that it had developed proposals for a rail link from Reading and Slough on the Great Western Main Line to London Heathrow airport. This will enable public consultation to begin.

The Western Rail Access to Heathrow study was undertaken in response a request from the government in which expressed support for the scheme in July 2012. Network Rail considered four options for WRAtH, before settling on a junction between Langley and Iver stations and a 5 km tunnel to Terminal 5 at the airport.

A steering group including Network Rail, the Department for Transport, Thames Valley Berkshire Local Enterprise Partnership, Slough Borough Council and Heathrow Airport is working to develop the scheme.

Subject to a satisfactory business case and the agreement of terms with the aviation industry, planning permission could be sought. If granted, Network Rail would begin highways enabling work at the end of 2016, with tunnel enabling work starting in early 2018. The project would be completed in 2021.

'Our plans for a new rail link to Heathrow from the west will dramatically improve rail links, reduce congestion on existing rail services and provide a boost to the local economy', said Network Rail Managing Director, Western Route, Patrick Hallgate. 'It's important that we take the opportunity to discuss these plans so we can ensure the investment made in a bigger, better railway delivers maximum benefit.'
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Old February 5th, 2014, 07:28 PM   #1704
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Originally Posted by dimlys1994 View Post
Today on Railway Gazette:

http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/i...t-awarded.html

Edinburgh - Glasgow electrification design contract awarded
28 Jan 2014

UK: The public version of the final business case for the Edinburgh - Glasgow Improvement Programme was published by Transport Scotland on January 27, when infrastructure manager Network Rail announced that Costain and Morgan Sindall had been awarded five-month alliancing contracts worth £5m to define the detailed scope, programme and target prices for EGIP.

In July 2012 Transport Scotland had announced a phased approach to EGIP, based a review undertaken by Jacobs to reduce costs from initial proposals. The £650m first phase has subsequently been amended to include more extensive redevelopment of Glasgow Queen Street station including track remodelling, costing £120m. This takes the overall cost of the first phase to around £742m, including £126m of optimism bias and contingency.

Costain and Morgan Sindall are to undertake detailed planning for the largest element of EGIP, covering 25 kV 50 Hz electrification of 156 track-km on the Glasgow Queen Street - Edinburgh Waverley route via Falkirk High as well as clearance works at Winchburgh Tunnel, infrastructure works at Glasgow Queen Street and Edinburgh Waverley stations and platform extensions at Croy, Falkirk High, Polmont and Linlithgow.

Network Rail expects to award the main civil engineering and electrification contract worth around £250m this summer, with completion planned for 2016.

Off-peak journey times between Edinburgh and Glasgow would be around 42 min following completion of the first phase, with capacity for four trains/h. A second phase of EGIP from 2025 could increase capacity to six trains/h, reduce journey times to 37 min and provide a connection to the future Edinburgh Gateway station.
Great news.

How many railways lines are still runed by diesel?
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Old February 5th, 2014, 07:35 PM   #1705
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Great news.

How many railways lines are still runed by diesel?
Lots, all of Wales, most of the north (except city commuter lines), lots of lines in Scotland, Great Western, some lines in Anglia, Selby-Hull, a few on Southern, one London Overground line to name a few
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Old February 6th, 2014, 04:52 PM   #1706
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Bombardier wins Crossrail contract

Not really a surprise...

Quote:
Bombardier has won a £1bn contract to provide trains for the London Crossrail project, the government has announced.

The company will provide 65 trains for the Crossrail service, which is set to open in 2018.

The trains will be manufactured and assembled at Bombardier's plant in Derby.

The Department for Transport (DfT) said Bombardier's contract would support 760 manufacturing jobs and 80 apprenticeships.

In total, up to 340 new jobs will be created, said a spokesperson for Bombardier.

The DfT also said that about 74% of the amount spent on the contract would stay in the UK economy.

Canada's Bombardier beat Japan's Hitachi and Spain's CAF to secure the deal.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-26063121

The rolling stock will be the Aventra design:

Last edited by k.k.jetcar; February 6th, 2014 at 04:59 PM.
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Old February 6th, 2014, 05:28 PM   #1707
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There are problems in Devon, in Dawlish precisely, between Exeter and Plymouth. The sea has destroyed the tracks.

Why is it that most of the rail network in Devon and the whole of Cornwall depend on that short sector, which in case of gale, like now, tends to suffer a lot?

Would it be possible, or has it ever been seriously considered to reopen the other line between Exeter and Plymouth, the one that went through the north side of Dartmoor (Bere Alston to Yeoford via Okehampton)?

At least, that would warrant that the Devon and Cornwall railways would remain connected to the rest of Britain...
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Old February 9th, 2014, 03:58 PM   #1708
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Quote:
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There are problems in Devon, in Dawlish precisely, between Exeter and Plymouth. The sea has destroyed the tracks.

Why is it that most of the rail network in Devon and the whole of Cornwall depend on that short sector, which in case of gale, like now, tends to suffer a lot?

Would it be possible, or has it ever been seriously considered to reopen the other line between Exeter and Plymouth, the one that went through the north side of Dartmoor (Bere Alston to Yeoford via Okehampton)?

At least, that would warrant that the Devon and Cornwall railways would remain connected to the rest of Britain...

If this is even considered, we will see no sign of a re-route for at least three or four years.
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Old February 9th, 2014, 06:12 PM   #1709
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Old February 9th, 2014, 07:34 PM   #1710
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Wouldn't it be cheaper to reinforce the embankment of the current railway line and to encase the railway in during-good-weather-removeable glass to make a glass tunnel. If Great Britain can build the Thames barrier, why couldn't it tame also the waters of Dawlish?
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Old February 9th, 2014, 07:56 PM   #1711
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Wouldn't it be cheaper to reinforce the embankment of the current railway line and to encase the railway in during-good-weather-removeable glass to make a glass tunnel. If Great Britain can build the Thames barrier, why couldn't it tame also the waters of Dawlish?
The tames barrier and encasing a sea wall and railway line in a glass tunnel are two completely different things. The sea wall runs next to cliffs which can crumble and bits fall off them, what would happen if during bad whether some of the material fell onto the glass tunnel and smashed? Got to replace that section. No it's not cheaper the cheapest thing to do is to build up the beaches which increases friction against the big waves reducing their energy. While installing groynes would be one option it may cause effects to other beaches (see what happened to Barton with the groynes at Bournemouth) so probably the best option would be beach nourishment as well as groynes so that there are two levels of protection.
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Old February 9th, 2014, 09:11 PM   #1712
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Even just placing a load of big rocks at the foot of the sea wall to help break the waves when they come in will help, and it won't mean beaches further along will disappear...
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Old February 9th, 2014, 09:17 PM   #1713
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Think that's already been done in some places?
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Old February 10th, 2014, 12:25 AM   #1714
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BriedisUnIzlietne View Post
Wouldn't it be cheaper to reinforce the embankment of the current railway line and to encase the railway in during-good-weather-removeable glass to make a glass tunnel. If Great Britain can build the Thames barrier, why couldn't it tame also the waters of Dawlish?
No, it would be cheaper to reinforce the embankment, but the sea can destroy even that.

As for a glass tunnel, forget it, that´s irrealistic.

===========================================

In Spain, we have a similar case to that of Dawlish, on the Barcelona-Mataró-Blanes-Maçanet line, wich almost entirely runs on the beach, and in three particular points tends to suffer a lot in case of gale, and that even though the embankment has been reinforced and it´s the Mediterranean, not the Atlantic (which is obviously much more powerful).

There´s talk to remove the Mataró line, but since that´s a Barcelona suburban line, the cost would be enormous.

Here you have a video of the Spanish twin case to Dawlish, the section between Cabrera de Mar-Vilassar de Mar and Mataró stations. On the same line there are two more "difficult" places like this:



(sorry for the off-topic)
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Old February 10th, 2014, 12:34 AM   #1715
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As I understand it the only permanent solution in both locations would be to move the track inland, but a cost would be very high. The cheapest and most realistic solution is probably to do no major rebuild and simply repair the line when needed. This kind of damage is not so common.
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Old February 10th, 2014, 12:58 AM   #1716
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As I understand it the only permanent solution in both locations would be to move the track inland, but a cost would be very high.
Yes. I just don´t know which case is worse, because the Spanish case is a suburban line with a frequency of a train every 5 minutes per direction at the peak hours, and the area that the line serves is very much populated (just under 400,000). Removing the line from the sea front would be terribly expensive, since that would involve an entirely new line, almost completely underground between Barcelona and Mataró (that´s almost as long as the Channel Tunnel).

The case in Dawlish is different, since one whole region and a big chunk of another depend entirely on the Dawlish section, so in comparison the effects of cuts at Dawlish are even worse, but at least there would be the much cheaper alternative of reopening the Bere Alston to Yeoford line, allowing by the way a very scenic route through the north of Dartmoor, which is certainly less populated than the coast, but definitely safer, and would warrant that Cornwall and a big chunk of Devon wouldn´t be isolated from the rest of the country.

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Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
The cheapest and most realistic solution is probably to do no major rebuild and simply repair the line when needed. This kind of damage is not so common.
Not in the Lake Geneva.

I think there is at least one other similar case in St Gilles Croix de Vie, near Nantes, and another one between Auray and Quiberon in Brittany (western France), but I´m not sure the sea is just as dangerous for the line as in the British and Spanish cases.
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Old February 10th, 2014, 01:12 AM   #1717
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How about elevating the line on a viaduct about 5 m high? Wouldn't work in Spain because of visual effects in a densely populated area, but perhaps acceptable in UK?

As for removing the seaside line by building a new one further inland, there is a precedent for that. I'm talking about Genoa-Ventimiglia railway. I believe the total length of tunnels on that line is approaching 100 km and it has taken decades to get there...
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Old February 10th, 2014, 01:13 AM   #1718
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Not in the Lake Geneva.
I bet you've never heard of tsunamis in the lake Geneva
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Old February 10th, 2014, 02:16 AM   #1719
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
How about elevating the line on a viaduct about 5 m high? Wouldn't work in Spain because of visual effects in a densely populated area, but perhaps acceptable in UK?

As for removing the seaside line by building a new one further inland, there is a precedent for that. I'm talking about Genoa-Ventimiglia railway. I believe the total length of tunnels on that line is approaching 100 km and it has taken decades to get there...
http://www.westcountryviews.co.uk/to...sh/dawlish.htm

Look at these images (), trains meandering along along the wall with the pretty little town of Dawlish behind it, striking cliffs behind adding to the whole feel of the area.
The tourism industry in the area would be lost too since the beach would be dominated by the viaduct. The homes overlooking the sea would get a great view of the supports of the viaduct(!)
Then there's the stations that sit on the sea wall which would either be closed (not acceptable) or located on the viaduct adding to the cost and also be awkward to get to since you'd need a lift because of DDA regulations.
Then there's the issue that the sea wall is the sea wall protecting the cliffs from erosion and the town from becoming the sea.

So not really acceptable in the uk
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Old February 10th, 2014, 03:49 AM   #1720
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Quote:
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How about elevating the line on a viaduct about 5 m high? Wouldn't work in Spain because of visual effects in a densely populated area, but perhaps acceptable in UK?
There´s no way that they´re doing that, the Devon coast is a very touristic area in Britain.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
As for removing the seaside line by building a new one further inland, there is a precedent for that. I'm talking about Genoa-Ventimiglia railway. I believe the total length of tunnels on that line is approaching 100 km and it has taken decades to get there...
The Italian Riviera is another difficult area, as it´s incredibly expensive to build a new line.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sunfuns View Post
I bet you've never heard of tsunamis in the lake Geneva
Tell us about that (on the Swiss thread).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Manchester77 View Post
http://www.westcountryviews.co.uk/to...sh/dawlish.htm

Look at these images (), trains meandering along along the wall with the pretty little town of Dawlish behind it, striking cliffs behind adding to the whole feel of the area.
The tourism industry in the area would be lost too since the beach would be dominated by the viaduct. The homes overlooking the sea would get a great view of the supports of the viaduct(!)
Then there's the stations that sit on the sea wall which would either be closed (not acceptable) or located on the viaduct adding to the cost and also be awkward to get to since you'd need a lift because of DDA regulations.
Then there's the issue that the sea wall is the sea wall protecting the cliffs from erosion and the town from becoming the sea.

So not really acceptable in the uk
What they really should do is to reinforce the sea wall and the embankment, it looks really shaky, definitely too thin, and when I think that it´s the Atlantic and not the Med, it gives me the goosebumps.

They should reinforce it with rocks and/or concrete blocks, as if it were a port.

Otherwise, this is not the last chapter, I´m afraid.

The thing is that it will cost money. And it will have a visual effect anyway.
But you can´t leave all of Cornwall and half of Devon isolated.

They should reinforce the sea wall and the embankment, and reopen Bere Alston to Yeoford.
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