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Old January 14th, 2011, 08:09 PM   #521
quashlo
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Kawasaki Heavy Industries looks to grow through overseas projects
http://www.sankeibiz.jp/business/new...0504002-n1.htm

Quote:
Buoyed by both a global trend for environmental awareness in an effort to reduce greenhouse gases and vigorous infrastructure investment in developing countries as part of urbanization, Kawasaki Heavy Industries is hoping to see its railcar business take off. The company is strengthening its bidding efforts overseas, such as for the high-speed rail project in California, U.S.A.—slated to be put out to bid within a few years—and the high-speed rail market in Asia, where construction is proceeding apace. By FY2020, the company aims to increase sales in its railcar specialization to ¥300 billion, twice what it was for FY2009. One of the future cornerstones of Kawasaki’s growth strategy is the new efSET high-speed train, which has been in development since 2008.

Development of a train for the global market
After completing development of the efSET last summer, Kawasaki Heavy Industries Rolling Stock Company president Kanehana Yoshinori made clear his aspirations for the company’s future efforts to win overseas projects: “If we receive an order, we can begin production immediately. We’re out to win this game with a train designed for the global market.”

The efSET is a departure from the previous rolling stock development method that involved designing new trains for each individual order. Instead, Kawasaki developed the efSET as an amalgamation of the technical expertise gained in the design of Shinkansen rolling stock, expressly designed to compete against high-speed rail units from other countries. In short, the efSET is a train for the global market.

In addition to reducing the environmental impacts of the train by decreasing noise and vibration, Kawasaki also strengthened the train’s performance in collisions, including special considerations for fire resistance and collision absorption. Unlike the Shinkansen running on dedicated track within Japan, trains overseas run on conventional track, and there is a high risk of collisions with people or automobiles, equating to demands for higher safety in rolling stock. In addition, in order to meet the needs of foreign markets, where trains need to run at high speeds through empty fields, Kawasaki designed the efSET for a commercial speed of 350 kph, faster than the Shinkansen (280 to 320 kph).

Kawasaki’s first target with the efSET is the North American market. In the U.S., rail transport is being revisited in light of environmental concerns, and in April 2009 the federal government revealed plans for high-speed rail projects connecting major cities as part of an economic stimulus program. As a result, it’s expected that the demand for rolling stock will expand.

In addition, the U.S. has a Buy American clause designed to protect industry and secure jobs: the railcar manufacturer is obligated to ensure that 60 percent or more of the procurement costs are spent on domestically-produced components. In addition, final assembly must be completed in the U.S. The stipulation is a source of concern for the “Big 3” of Alstom (France), Siemens (Germany), and Bombardier (Canada), who are structured around production primarily for the European market. But as an “old-timer,” Kawasaki Heavy Industries has been doing everything from railcar manufacturing to maintenance at two factories in the U.S. since 1975. There is speculation that this is the perfect opportunity for Kawasaki to build its experience with the efSET, if only to help push along its marketing efforts overall.

On January 13, Kawasaki announced the completion of investments to reinforce its position which had already been underway for some time, including increasing the production output of its local railcar factory in Nebraska state and the construction of a new factory wing to allow for in-house production of components for North American projects that were previously outsourced. One step at a time, Kawasaki is making strategic moves to extend its market share.

Strategy for the Chinese market is key
However, it’s unclear whether Kawasaki’s achievements in the U.S.—which accounted for the highest share of the company’s orders for railcars and related components, at 35 percent—will provide momentum for winning projects in developing countries and other markets.

In particular, China, which has strong ambitions for domestic railcar production under the leadership of its government, is a difficult market to penetrate with technological expertise alone. Kawasaki is aiming to secure revenue through a railcar engineering joint venture formed in 2005 with local manufacturer CSR Sifang, but with only that, there is still the possibility the company may miss out on enormous business opportunities in China, which is constructing a high-speed rail network spanning 16,000 km in total length by 2015. Just how will Kawasaki be able to take its strengths as a “one-stop shop”—with a plethora of technical expertise and real-world success in manufacturing railcars—and adapt it to markets with different business environments and needs? Major innovations in the company’s business model hold the answer.

Kawasaki Heavy Industries’ railcar manufacturing hub, its Lincoln Plant in Nebraska, U.S.A.
With the latest factory expansion, the scale of the production line at the Lincoln Plant has almost doubled, allowing it to handle multiple orders simultaneously. The plant now also has testing facilities that will allow it to conduct the testing of assembled railcars previously conducted only at the Yonkers, New York facility.
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Old January 14th, 2011, 08:11 PM   #522
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Interview with JR Central president
http://www.sankeibiz.jp/business/new...0503005-n1.htm

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For the Chūō Shinkansen maglev project, you are aiming to open the full length of the line between Tōkyō and Ōsaka in 2045, but you’re discovering opposition from prefectures along the line regarding who should pay for the cost of intermediate stations.
Even if you call them “stations,” there is the question of just what really qualifies as a “station.” If, for example, we assume that the issue is about local governments asking us to “reduce their funding share (towards the station),” then I think there is room for compromise. And with regards to the dispensation of funds, there are any number of methods such as lump-sum or installments. Yes, we are building stations, but they must be in a form that will allow them to contribute to the development of the local region. The problem is in just how close both our sides can come to an agreement, and we have no reason to be pessimistic about the ultimate fate of these discussions.

By when would you like to see a resolution?
As far as I’m concerned, the earlier the better. The final report by the Transport Policy Council subcommittee, an advisory body to Minister of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism Mabuchi Sumio, is expected to be published this spring. After that, there is the process of declaring the constructing and operating entities, approval of the implementation plan, and formal direction to begin construction. If we can’t attain at least some resolution by then, we will not be able to begin the environmental assessment, which is a mandatory two-year process.

What is your number-one goal in marketing high-speed rail such as the maglev and Shinkansen to the United States?
In the U.S., we want to serve as a consultant that can provide railroad operation knowhow. Of course, there’s not much money to be had in that alone. But if we can introduce the maglev or Shinkansen into the United States early on, while we wait for our maglev opening or the scheduled replacement of Shinkansen trains or upgrades of components, the manufacturers can already be in production. They can be tackling technology development and cost reduction, and eventually we’ll be able to reap those benefits as well. For JR Central, these are the benefits of entering the overseas market.

There is some worry that superconducting maglev technology could someday find its way to China or other countries.
We must avoid a situation where we find engineers that have reached retirement age and left the company are instead working in China or Korea. We want them to stay on with the company even after retirement age as advisors, transferring their expertise and experience to the next generation of engineers.

The domestic passenger transport market is on a one-way decline.
Our only option is do our best to strengthen the Tōkyō ‒ Ōsaka segment, which has by far the largest passenger volumes. As population declines in the other areas, demand will also decrease. We will need to further strengthen low-cost operating methods without sacrificing safety. Stores in commercial districts in second-tier cities are closing down one after another. But we can’t simply abandon train lines in those areas. We will need to devise strategies, similar to the way that ferries cancel services during strong winds or heavy rains.”

Yamada Yoshiomi
Graduated from the Graduate Schools for Law and Politics at Tōkyō University. Joined the Japanese National Railways in 1971. Joined JR Central in 1987. After serving as personnel chief, managing chief of general planning, managing chief of project implementation, and vice president, he was promoted to his current position in June 2010. Born in Tōkyō Prefecture.
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Old January 15th, 2011, 08:09 AM   #523
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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
More JR West 287 series testing

These are the new series of limited express rolling stock to replace aging 183 series units. These will enter revenue service in March.

In 3+4 formation, departing Kyōto (2010.12.25):


Source: JRwehksf on YouTube

A 4-car unit departing from the “new” Platform 11 at Ōsaka Station (2011.01.10):


Source: 32602Fand3060F on YouTube
Wow, they look remarkably like these trains from The Netherlands:

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Old January 15th, 2011, 09:33 PM   #524
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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Kawasaki Heavy Industries looks to grow through overseas projects
http://www.sankeibiz.jp/business/new...0504002-n1.htm

With the latest factory expansion, the scale of the production line at the Lincoln Plant has almost doubled, allowing it to handle multiple orders simultaneously. The plant now also has testing facilities that will allow it to conduct the testing of assembled railcars previously conducted only at the Yonkers, New York facility.
"Strategy for the Chinese market is key
However, it’s unclear whether Kawasaki’s achievements in the U.S.—which accounted for the highest share of the company’s orders for railcars and related components, at 35 percent—will provide momentum for winning projects in developing countries and other markets.

In particular, China, which has strong ambitions for domestic railcar production under the leadership of its government, is a difficult market to penetrate with technological expertise alone. Kawasaki is aiming to secure revenue through a railcar engineering joint venture formed in 2005 with local manufacturer CSR Sifang, but with only that, there is still the possibility the company may miss out on enormous business opportunities in China, which is constructing a high-speed rail network spanning 16,000 km in total length by 2015. Just how will Kawasaki be able to take its strengths as a “one-stop shop”—with a plethora of technical expertise and real-world success in manufacturing railcars—and adapt it to markets with different business environments and needs? Major innovations in the company’s business model hold the answer."

=

This is interesting, they are either just trying to promote themselves even more or are actually trying to get back into the Chinese market. Especially after the whole E2/CRH2 debacle. Will be interesting to see whether in the future we'll another Japanese train on the CRH network.
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Old January 15th, 2011, 11:29 PM   #525
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Originally Posted by Nozumi 300 View Post
"Strategy for the Chinese market is key
However, it’s unclear whether Kawasaki’s achievements in the U.S.—which accounted for the highest share of the company’s orders for railcars and related components, at 35 percent—will provide momentum for winning projects in developing countries and other markets.

In particular, China, which has strong ambitions for domestic railcar production under the leadership of its government, is a difficult market to penetrate with technological expertise alone. Kawasaki is aiming to secure revenue through a railcar engineering joint venture formed in 2005 with local manufacturer CSR Sifang, but with only that, there is still the possibility the company may miss out on enormous business opportunities in China, which is constructing a high-speed rail network spanning 16,000 km in total length by 2015. Just how will Kawasaki be able to take its strengths as a “one-stop shop”—with a plethora of technical expertise and real-world success in manufacturing railcars—and adapt it to markets with different business environments and needs? Major innovations in the company’s business model hold the answer."

=

This is interesting, they are either just trying to promote themselves even more or are actually trying to get back into the Chinese market. Especially after the whole E2/CRH2 debacle. Will be interesting to see whether in the future we'll another Japanese train on the CRH network.
After Bombardier Zefiro, I don't believe you'll see China buying new HSR trains outside of CSR and CNR designs.
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Old January 16th, 2011, 05:56 AM   #526
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This is interesting, they are either just trying to promote themselves even more or are actually trying to get back into the Chinese market. Especially after the whole E2/CRH2 debacle. Will be interesting to see whether in the future we'll another Japanese train on the CRH network.
KHI may be finished supplying HSR trainsets, but they do have other business with/in China, including supplying commuter designs, among which some are being exported to Singapore:
http://www.khi.co.jp/english/pressre...3090507_2.html

Quote:
After Bombardier Zefiro, I don't believe you'll see China buying new HSR trains outside of CSR and CNR designs
Yes they pretty have samples of almost everything out there, so all the reverse engineering is done.
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Old January 17th, 2011, 06:27 AM   #527
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Japan hopeful with deadline extension for Brazil high-speed rail project
http://diamond.jp/articles/-/10688

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The battle for the Brazilian Trem de Alta Velocidade (TAV) high-speed rail project, in which Korea had appeared to be the favorite, has now been "extended" at the last minute.

In November of last year, the Brazilian government made a sudden announcement that it would extend the deadline for bids on the TAV project—at the time, originally only three days away—to April of this year. Officials from the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) say they were caught off guard after believing all the rumors that said Korea was going to win the project. Executives from firms in the Japanese consortium, including Mitsui & Co., Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, and Hitachi, had decided to forego placing a bid on the project, but are now relieved that “at least there is still some possibility left to win the project.”

The Trem de Alta Velocidade (TAV), slated for an opening in 2016 together with the Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, is a ¥1.6 trillion megaproject to link Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo states (about 510 km apart) in an hour and a half. The Brazilian government’s specified terms, however, were anything but popular.

The winner of the bidding process would be forced to operate the railway for 40 years at a maximum fare of 0.49 reals (approx. ¥24) per km—a number obtained using overly optimistic ridership projections by Japanese standards—and without any mechanisms to hedge the risk relating to ridership performance. The estimates of construction costs were also optimistic, and one spokesperson for the Japanese consortium said the project was “too great a risk for the private sector.”

The sole team that was still determined to move forward with a bid, in defiance of these risks, was Korea. MLIT officials had given up on the project, saying, “The Korean team is more than happy to agree to those unfavorable terms.” For Korea, Brazil is a stepping stone for high-speed rail projects in the United States, and MLIT officials say that the Koreans’ aggressive government-led marketing is an attempt to “build their portfolio, regardless of the risk involved.”

As for the reason behind its indifference to the Korean team’s passionate serenades, the Brazilian government explained that it preferred a competitive bidding process over a lone bid by Korea, and revealed that some teams had made a promise to submit a bid if the deadline was extended. In reality, its believed that before the decision to extend the bidding deadline, the Brazilian government had sounded out the local Brazilian team and the Japanese team about a “formal” bidding process, and is now taking great pains to somehow achieve a competitive bidding process.

However, spokespersons for the Japanese government were a little puzzled: “The explanations by the Brazilian government aren’t telling the whole truth. In reality, I wonder if they simply don’t want to award the project to an inexperienced team like Korea. If it was the European teams who had said they would still move forward with their bids and everyone else had backed out, they would likely not have extended the deadline.” One executive from a big-name firm notes, “I believe the scuffle between North Korea and South Korea, only three days before the decision to extend the deadline, was another factor. Having misgivings about entrusting a long-term 40-year operations contract with South Korea, which must deal with the ‘North Korean factor,’ is not irrational.”

Meanwhile, the Brazilian government has denied any changes to the contract terms as a result of the extension of the bidding deadline. One party to the negotiations was left dumbfounded: “The Brazilian government is persistent that there are no errors in the ridership projections, making any relaxation of the contract terms difficult.” If a competitive bidding process is initiated without modifications to the contract terms, it’s certain that the Korean team, quick to push aside the risks with the project, will remain the likeliest candidate.

This month, the Brazilian government changed administrations. One executive from the Japanese consortium remarks, “The extension is good news, but there is still a mountain of problems, and we now need to re-evaluate whether or not we want to bid on the project. It all depends on negotiations with the new Rousseff administration.” In addition to the change in administrations, Carnival—a national event—is fast approaching, and there is already speculation that the project will be awarded as early as April. Will Japan, which was left with a bitter experience in the bidding for nuclear power plants in the United Arab Emirates, be able to stage a comeback over Korea, just as it vindicated itself in Jordan and Turkey? It’s too early to tell which way the winds blow.
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Old January 17th, 2011, 06:28 AM   #528
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Japanese officials hold HSR seminar in Los Angeles
http://www.nhk.or.jp/news/html/20110...421211000.html

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On January 14, the Japanese government held a seminar to market Shinkansen technology in California, U.S.A., where a high-speed rail project is in the works. Officials stressed the need for expertise and knowhow to deal with California's numerous earthquakes, marketing the Shinkansen's resilience against seismic events.

The seminar was held in Los Angeles, California by the Japanese government together with representatives from Japanese firms including JR and railcar manufacturers to market Japan's Shinkansen technology to the U.S., where plans to construct large-scale high-speed rail projects are underway. This is the third seminar following similar events at the capital Washington, D.C. and in Chicago. At the seminar, Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism (MLIT) Deputy Vice-Minister Shukuri Masafumi commented, "If we participate in the high-speed rail project, we can put our decades of experience with the Shinkansen to good use and contribute to creation of local jobs and economic development." In addition, Shukuri said that technical expertise and knowhow to combat earthquakes is critical for an earthquake-prone region like California, and marketed the advantages of the Shinkansen against earthquakes to local officials. At a press conference following the seminar, Shukuri seemed hopeful: "They understand that the technology behind Japan's Shinkansen is high-quality, and we have a good chance of winning the bid."
The article also has an accompanying video news report:
http://www.nhk.or.jp/news/html/20110...421211000.html

I will post the presentations as soon as the Japan International Transport Institute (JITI) uploads them to the website.

The California High Speed Rail Blog has a pretty thorough overview of the presentation here (this blog is also the best place to discuss the CAHSR project in general):
http://www.cahsrblog.com/2011/01/%e2...united-states/

Excerpt:
Quote:
  • Mixed Use Development
    Land use planning and economic development of station areas has been an integral part of HSR development from the beginning in Japan. Examples of both infill and greenfield station developments there were illustrated. Useful parallels to Los Angeles Union Station and Fresno’s future HSR station were made.
  • Earthquake Design Countermeasures
    They are extensive in the Japanese system and we can be confident that being on a California HSR train will be one of the safest places to be when the big one hits.
  • Integration of Conventional Branch Lines into HSR Operations
    The Japanese practice of trains uncoupling cars at intermediate stations and having one of the cars proceed down the “conventional” railroad (at conventional speeds) was discussed. This would certainly be possible here. In a way it would be easier since HSR and conventional railroads would use the same gauge (4 ft. 8.5 in.) whereas Shinkansen uses a different gauge than the “legacy” railways in Japan. However, the lack of electrification on American railways would make this harder. Down the San Joaquin corridor and even the LA Metrolink/Surfliner corridors would be candidates for this kind of one-seat operation.
  • Technology Transfer
    Kawasaki Heavy Industries (which already has two plants in the US for conventional railcar manufacture) as well as the JR operating companies’ representatives all expressed a strong willingness to transfer their expertise to this country. This would be accomplished through the development of American parts suppliers, final assembly in the U.S., and pre-training of trainset maintenance staff. Kawasaki even expressed a desire to retool American auto parts suppliers to HSR parts suppliers.
  • FRA Compliance
    Kawasaki asserts that their efSET (2) proposed train for export will “comply with FRA requirements”. Whether this is the current FRA requirements for inefficient overbuilt HSR trains (Acela) or upcoming sensible regulations remains to be seen.
Marketing the seismic considerations behind Shinkansen design was definitely a smart move, as this is one area where the Japanese have a fair amount of experience above other competitors.
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Old January 17th, 2011, 06:29 AM   #529
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End of the road for Yufu DX limited express: Part 1

The Yufu DX was a limited express service on the Kyūdai Main Line, serving leisure travel between Fukuoka (Hakata) and Ōita via Yufuin, a famous onsen (hot springs) area. The service was operated with a single 4-car Kiha 183 series train, but these cars will now be refurbished to serve on the new Asobōi limited express to debut between Kumamoto and Miyaji in March together with the Kyūshū Shinkansen. Last run was 2011.01.10.

Some pics of the last few runs:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/at0513/

Yufu DX 2 between Haruda and Tenpaizan on the Kagoshima Main Line (2011.01.09):





Last day of service (2011.01.10).
Yufu DX 4 between Sugikawachi and Amagase on the Kyūdai Main Line:





Between Haruda and Tenpaizan on the Kagoshima Main Line. After turning back at Hakata, the train would make a final trip back to Ōita as Yufu DX 5, which would become the official last run of the service.



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Old January 17th, 2011, 06:29 AM   #530
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End of the road for Yufu DX limited express: Part 2

Next, a few videos to commemorate the end of service:

Rare scenes of the unit on the Hisatsu Line, passing through more of Kyūshū's beautiful natural scenery (2009.05.31):


Source: RYOUTA69 on YouTube

In Yufuin in the snow (2010.12.26), along with various other trains on the line including the Yufuin no Mori.


Source: soniccer883 on YouTube

Cab view from Yufu DX 1 from Hakata to Ōita:
Source: SuperExpress1 on YouTube

Part 1: Hakata to Futsukaichi



Part 2: Futsukaichi to Tosu



Part 3: Tosu to Kurume http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBvDiE3xlxM&hd=1
Part 4: Kurume to Kurume Daigaku-mae http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IDMmbvWxYwE&hd=1
Part 5: Kurume Daigaku-mae to Chikugo Yoshii http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NQ3WE--25-I&hd=1
Part 6: Chikugo Yoshii to Hita http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kVcet36kxOk&hd=1
Part 7: Hita to Amagase http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=noAj96q1ghM&hd=1
Part 8: Amagase to Bungo Mori http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iiWzTxoNSSE&hd=1
Part 9: Bungo Mori to Bungo Nakamura http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4izZMUQx86M&hd=1
Part 10: Bungo Nakamura to Yufuin http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYwTuB6racQ&hd=1
Part 11: Yufuin to Yunohira http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQ3e5cefqY4&hd=1
Part 12: Yunohira to Mukainoharu http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B7H2hQM8KYs&hd=1
Part 13: Mukainoharu to Ōita http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ewrr1_2vA9I&hd=1
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Old January 17th, 2011, 06:30 AM   #531
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Joint emergency rescue training session on Kyūshū Shinkansen

On 2011.01.13, JR Kyūshū held an emergency rescue drill to improve emergency response and coordination with police, fire, hospitals, etc. in the event of a life-threatening disaster on the new Kyūshū Shinkansen extension.

Some pictures:
Source: http://kyushushinkansen.com/



The emergency rescue drill envisions a 6.0 M earthquake in the Kyūshū region, with a train coming to an emergency stop between Shin-Tosu and Hakata General Car Yard. Damage to trackside equipment is severe and train operations must be terminated. There are injured passengers inside the train.





This woman suffered an abrasion on her right lower leg during the earthquake.







Ladder truck to rescue passengers in critical condition.





A couple videos:
Source: jf6auo on YouTube

Fire response team prepping the ladder truck as EMT (?) crews climb the ladders to the train.



Extending the ladder

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Old January 17th, 2011, 06:32 AM   #532
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Kyūshū Shinkansen: Shin-Ōmuta Station

Continuing the station series from a month or two ago, some pics of Shin-Ōmuta Station (2010.08):
Source: http://ameblo.jp/maimai24/











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Old January 17th, 2011, 06:33 AM   #533
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More Kyūshū Shinkansen testing

Some recent pics (2011.01.14) of continued testing on the Kyūshū Shinkansen, in preparation for the opening of the line about two months from now. These are shots between Shin-Tosu and Hakata, at the north end of the Chikushi Tunnel—at almost 12 km, the longest tunnel on the Kyūshū Shinkansen—in Nakagawa Town, Fukuoka Prefecture. This is where the urbanization starts to build up surrounding Fukuoka City.
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/at0513/

An N700 series "R" unit (JR Kyūshū unit) leaving behind Hakata General Car Yard and heading for the Chikushi Tunnel.



This section has a 3% grade that existing Tōkaidō / San'yō Shinkansen trains cannot climb.



The view from the mountains to the west of the line.



The tunnel portal immediately opens up onto residential areas.



JR West's Hakata General Car Yard and Hakata-Minami Station are located at the base of the small mountain in this picture.



Leaving Fukuoka, there's actually three small tunnels before the train reaches the Chikushi Tunnel. The tunnel on the left is the Nakagawa Tunnel, the last tunnel before the Chikushi Tunnel (on the right).







The local wildlife... Since the line is pretty much all aerial structure, the critters can still romp about unimpeded.

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Old January 17th, 2011, 06:33 AM   #534
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N700 series unit R8 being transported from Kawasaki Heavy Industries

Cars from one of the 10 JR Kyūshū N700 units leaving Kawasaki Heavy Industries in Kōbe and being loaded onto barges (2011.01.15):
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/kansai299/

















Next to a JR West 521 series train at some open house event at the Kawasaki plant.

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Old January 17th, 2011, 06:35 AM   #535
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Kyūshū Shinkansen wallpaper

From JR West's promo website for the opening of the full length of the Kyūshū Shinkansen's Kagoshima route:
http://sanyo-kyushu.jp/





There's larger sizes if you can navigate their site.
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Old January 17th, 2011, 06:35 AM   #536
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Shūnan City and JR West sign agreement for improvements to JR Tokuyama Station
http://mytown.asahi.com/areanews/yam...101130019.html

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Shūnan City and JR West have signed an agreement in regards to the JR Tokuyama Station Area Improvements Project, and on January 13 the agreement was formally delivered at Shūnan City Hall. JR, which the City has selected as a subcontractor, will construct the new station building with elevated concourse and a north-south public passage, while the City will construct station plazas on the north and south sides of the station. The new station building and passage are slated for completion in FY2014.

The agreement was signed on January 6 and is composed of a basic agreement and a construction agreement. The construction agreement concerns carrying out construction of the public passage connecting the north and south sides of the station and a new station building with an elevated concourse, and if approved at an emergency session of the Shūnan City Council on January 17, the agreement will enter into effect.

The public passage is 130 m long and 8 m wide, with an elevator and escalators on the north end. The new station building with elevated concourse will be a steel-frame structure approx. 1,200 sq m in area, including a station administrative office, a platform bridge for transferring passengers, multi-function restrooms, and other features. The city will fund ¥6,551,110,000 while JR will fund ¥288,130,000 for the project.

In regards to a new station tenant building, according to the City's Central District Improvements Section, demolition of the current station tenant building would begin in FY2015 or later following completion of the new station building with elevated concourse. The new station tenant building would then be constructed near the site of the current station tenant building. According to spokespersons, the new station tenant building was not included in the agreement because the City is just now looking to "hammer out the details of the building."

Completion of the North Exit station plaza will occur after completion of the station tenant building, but the South Exit station plaza will be constructed and opened first, with a completion scheduled for FY2013.

Mayor Shimazu Yukio remarked, "This is our first new train station in close to 50 years. As population aging advances, we will continue with efforts towards a user-friendly station through barrier-free design. This project will also become the first step towards redevelopment of the area surrounding the station." Miura Katsuyoshi, chief of JR's Ōsaka Construction Office, said, "It will become more convenient for people to use the station. We hope that Tokuyama Station will serve as the nucleus of the city's future development."
Tokuyama Station is the central station for Shūnan City, served by the San'yō Shinkansen, San'yō Main Line, and Gantoku Line. Average daily entries are 7,250 passengers (2008).

Artist's sketch from the north side of the station:
Source: Shūnan City



I believe this might be what it will actually look like... The sketch above is probably just conceptual and to help with massing, etc.
Source: Yamaguchi41 on Flickr

image hosted on flickr


Interesting shadow simulation video:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/4560785015/

Existing Tokuyama Station (North Exit):

image hosted on flickr
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Old January 17th, 2011, 06:36 AM   #537
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JR East's E5 promo website updated

Apparently, they've been doing some updates to the promo website for the Hayabusa:
http://www.jreast.co.jp/e5/

In particular, it appears there will be some TV CMs making the air soon. There's also some posters (banners?), with the slogan, "Made in Dream." Probably a nod to the widely popular phrase 夢の超特急 ("yume no chō-tokkyū"), which roughly translates to "ultra-express of dreams." This phrase was (and still is) often used to describe the Shinkansen, ever since plans for the Tōkaidō Shinkansen were being laid decades ago.





The first one, with the lineup from steam to limited express to Shinkansen against a backdrop of Tōkyō, is awesome.
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Old January 17th, 2011, 02:25 PM   #538
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Yes, I like that banner too. They can be currently seen inside JR East commuter and suburban stock (last week I saw a lot of them on the Joban Line trains). I like the concept of the evolution of the trains in concert with the Tokyo skyline. It starts with a C61 Hudson type SL, then the kiha 80 Hatsukari, then 200 series shinkansen, E2 shinkansen, and E5. I think a C61 type was depicted because a C61 type is currently being restored to running condition at the Omiya Rolling Stock Center.
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Old January 17th, 2011, 02:30 PM   #539
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The Yufu DX video on the top of this thread is really cool

nice develpoment in general in Japan i must say!
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Old January 19th, 2011, 08:05 AM   #540
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JR East E6 makes first visit to Akita Sta. on test run

Fuji TV news report:
http://www.fnn-news.com/news/headlin...N00191422.html

*what a contrast to the uninspiring 701 series rolling stock on the neighboring track...
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