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Old March 16th, 2011, 06:44 PM   #681
Nephasto
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Ok. As it's a tunnel it's hard to make comparissons regarding aerodynamical problems.

I was only noticing that passenger trains travelling at 220km/h regularlly cross with slow freight trains with no problem. But as this is a tunnel, thinks obviously can be much more complicated.
Still, 140km/h seems too low.
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Old March 16th, 2011, 09:54 PM   #682
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You can't compare European rail tunnels to Japanese ones, since there is a big difference in how they are built. In Japan they build them as small as possible to reduce cost which makes the space around/between the trains very small. And the less space there is the lower the speed you have to travel to reduce stresses on the train when they are passing, and the freight trains aren't made to pass trains in at speed in small tunnels the same way that Shinkansen trains are. This is also one of the reasons why the aerodynamics on Shinkansen trains is so different compared to other high speed trains (long noses), it's to mitigate the issues you get for building small tunnels.

Comparing tunnel sizes you can see what I'm on about:
Code:
Tunnel:                Diameter :
-----------------------------------------------
Channel                7.4 m
Gotthard Base          8.8 m
Lötschberg Base        8.8 m
Seikan                 9.7 m
Sure the Seikan Tunnel have a slightly larger diameter than the others, but it's dual tracked instead of single as the other ones...

Last edited by loefet; March 16th, 2011 at 09:59 PM.
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Old March 16th, 2011, 11:14 PM   #683
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nephasto View Post
It appears that in this new shinkansen extension station have only 2 tracks, with no passing tracks in the middle (not served by platforms).
What they use to enable trains to pass fast is platform doors, which prevents passengers from approaching the lines.
Four-track stations:
Shin-Tosu
Kumamoto
Kagoshima Chūō

Three-track stations:
Chikugo Funagoya (2 outbound, 1 inbound)
Shin-Minamata (2 inbound, 1 outbound)

Of these, Shin-Tosu, Chikugo Funagoya, and Shin-Minamata are used for fast trains passing slower trains without stopping (the others are terminals or major stations where all trains stop).

While it's not exactly the SFFS at intermediate stations on lines like the Tōkaidō Shinkansen, where there are no platforms for the fast tracks, the general effect is the same.
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Old March 16th, 2011, 11:46 PM   #684
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Japanese traditional trains have also a smaller loading gauge than european ones, so it's clear than tunnels on narrow gauge network are smaller. Shinkansen are as large as, or larger than, european trains, but are certainly lower.

Here the Eurotunnel/Channel tunnel dimensions can be seen:

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Old March 17th, 2011, 12:48 PM   #685
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Since the Seikan tunnel is build with Shinkansen loading gauge, just think about the picture above, add about 2.3 meters in diameter (which is slightly larger than the outer diameter of tube in the picture) and try to add 2 trains that have a larger loading gauge then the one in the picture. It's a wonder the Japanese don't need to lube their trains just to get them through the tunnels :P[/
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Old March 17th, 2011, 01:03 PM   #686
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coccodrillo View Post
Japanese traditional trains have also a smaller loading gauge than european ones, so it's clear than tunnels on narrow gauge network are smaller. Shinkansen are as large as, or larger than, european trains, but are certainly lower.

Here the Eurotunnel/Channel tunnel dimensions can be seen:

The Saitan tunnel was built for shinkansen loading gauge, which is larger than the loading gauge used in Europa.
That can be seen by the fact that shinkansen trains are wider, capable of confortably having 3+2 arrangments (versus 2+2 in Europe) or crampled 3+3 (versus 3+2 in Europe).
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Old March 17th, 2011, 01:04 PM   #687
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Quote:
Originally Posted by loefet View Post
It's a wonder the Japanese don't need to lube their trains just to get them through the tunnels :P

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Old March 17th, 2011, 01:10 PM   #688
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Of these, Shin-Tosu, Chikugo Funagoya, and Shin-Minamata are used for fast trains passing slower trains without stopping (the others are terminals or major stations where all trains stop).
Faster trains on the Kyushu shinkansen (the ones from/to Osaka) stop only in Kumamoto.

I would like to know at which speed do they pass though the stations where there aren't "passing tracks" (meaning, in those station where they have to pass nexto to the platforms).
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Old March 17th, 2011, 02:48 PM   #689
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If i am not mistaken, the current speed on Seikan tunnel is 140 km/h due to the fact that existing gauge is 1067 mm.

In the future with the opening of Hokkaido Shinkansen, Seikan tunnel section will be dual gauge (1067 mm and 1435 mm).
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Old March 17th, 2011, 09:45 PM   #690
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nephasto View Post
The Saitan tunnel was built for shinkansen loading gauge, which is larger than the loading gauge used in Europa.
That can be seen by the fact that shinkansen trains are wider, capable of confortably having 3+2 arrangments (versus 2+2 in Europe) or crampled 3+3 (versus 3+2 in Europe).
Shinkansen train are large than european ones, but they are probably lower (especially than european freight trains and Channel tunnel road shuttles).
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Old March 17th, 2011, 11:22 PM   #691
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Channel tunnel road shuttles are much bigger than regular european loading gauge (UIC G1, which is used in european high speed trains, except eurostar, which is made to the smaller british loading gauge).

As for the japanese shinkansen gauge, appart from being large, I think (though I may be mistaken) than it's also taller (or at least wider on the top) than european loading gauge (UIC G1). I say this beccause E4 shinkansen trains (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E4_Series_Shinkansen) have 2 floors and are as wide in the top as in the base, no rounding.
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Old March 18th, 2011, 02:00 AM   #692
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Kawasaki / JR East team submits EOI for California HSR
http://www.nikkei.com/news/category/...08122009000000

Quote:
Kawasaki Heavy Industries has recently submitted to the California (United States) state government an Expression of Interest in bidding on its high-speed rail project. Standing behind Kawasaki is a consortium of six other firms including East Japan Railway Company (JR East), Sumitomo Corporation, Nippon Sharyō, Hitachi, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, and Mitsubishi Corporation. It’s expected that the bidding process will take place as early as late 2011.

The Expressions of Interest (EOIs) are a process to determine which firms are hoping to submit a proposal for the project, and the deadline for submitting the documents was on March 16. Groups that submitted EOIs will now be sent information regarding the bidding process and the technical specifications from a project planning firm working under the state government.

The Japanese team plans to market high-speed trainsets developed by Kawasaki on its own. JR East, which suffered damage in the Great East Japan Earthquake, will provide technological support and other assistance.
This article makes it sound like they are offering the efSET, with JR East perhaps providing operating knowhow for mixed traffic.
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Old March 18th, 2011, 06:37 AM   #693
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nephasto View Post
I would like to know at which speed do they pass though the stations where there aren't "passing tracks" (meaning, in those station where they have to pass nexto to the platforms).
Same speed as the rest of the line, 260 kph.
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Old March 18th, 2011, 06:40 AM   #694
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JR East will cash out earthquake insurance policy after damage in Great East Japan Earthquake
http://markets.nikkei.co.jp/features...zh000016032011

Quote:
It was revealed on March 15 that East Japan Railway Company (JR East) will cover a portion of the costs of damage incurred in the Great East Japan Earthquake through earthquake insurance. The railway has an earthquake insurance policy with an insurer worth a maximum of ¥71 billion, and plans to use the insurance payout to cover the cost of repairing damage, softening the associated financial impacts.

In March 2005, JR East purchased an earthquake insurance policy that provides compensation based on actual damages. It’s expected that as the total cost of the damage is determined, the railway will receive insurance payouts from the insurer. Many of the company’s rail facilities on the Tōhoku Shinkansen and conventional lines in the Tōhoku region suffered damage in the earthquake. In the Chūetsu Earthquake in Niigata Prefecture in autumn 2004, the railway incurred a total loss of approx. ¥70 billion in expenses to repair damage and lost revenues, but many railroad industry analysts say the damage in the latest earthquake will top ¥100 billion.
TBS news report on Tōhoku Shinkansen damage. Has some new clips of damaged track, catenary, and aerial structures. The section between Tōkyō and Nasu – Shiobara has already reopened and is now running trains twice hourly (up from once hourly when service was first restored).



In other news, the Akita Shinkansen (Komachi) partially reopened today (2011.03.18), between Akita and Morioka, running four roundtrips a day with all non-reserved seating. This means people in Morioka can now reach Tōkyō via the Sea of Japan side and the Jōetsu Shinkansen. Apparently, many victims in the affected areas up north are using the Sea of Japan route as a bypass to access the Kantō region and points further west.
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Old March 18th, 2011, 06:41 AM   #695
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In terms of zairaisen in the Tōhoku region:
  • Tōhoku Main Line: Kitakami – Ichinoseki section will reopen 2011.03.20
  • Tazawako Line: Ōmagari – Akabuchi section reopened 2011.03.18
  • Hanawa Line: Kōma – Matsuo Hachimandaira section reopened 2011.03.18; Matsuo Hachimandaira – Ōdate section will reopen 2011.03.19
  • Ōminato Line: Ōminato – Noheji reopened 2011.03.17
  • Gonō Line: Iwadate – Higashi-Noshiro and Kawabe – Ajigasawa sections reopened 2011.03.18; Iwadate – Ajigasawa section will reopen 2011.03.19
There’s still extensive damage along the coast, so it may take a long while before we get any news about restored service there. Unfortunately, in some situations where smaller local / rural lines suffer sufficient damage, there is a tendency to simply abandon them completely and never rebuild them, so who knows what the ultimate fate of these lines will be.

asahi.com aerial footage of Ishinomaki Line trains in Onagawa Town, Miyagi Prefecture (2011.03.13):

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Old March 18th, 2011, 07:40 PM   #696
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Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
In other news, the Akita Shinkansen (Komachi) partially reopened today (2011.03.18), between Akita and Morioka, running four roundtrips a day with all non-reserved seating. This means people in Morioka can now reach Tōkyō via the Sea of Japan side and the Jōetsu Shinkansen. Apparently, many victims in the affected areas up north are using the Sea of Japan route as a bypass to access the Kantō region and points further west.
Are there any direct zairaisen trains from Tokyo through Niigata, Uetsu and Ou main lines to Tsugaru tunnel and beyond?
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Old March 18th, 2011, 07:45 PM   #697
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What about Tohoku shinkansen?
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Old March 19th, 2011, 03:09 PM   #698
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What about Tohoku shinkansen?
I hear plans to reopen Tohoku Shinkansen between Aomori and Morioka on 23rd instant. Can anyone confirm or deny?
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Old March 20th, 2011, 12:35 PM   #699
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Is the Yurikamome train service back online?
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Old March 22nd, 2011, 06:45 AM   #700
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blackraven View Post
Is the Yurikamome train service back online?
Yurikamome belongs in the urban thread, but to answer the question:
Yes, service was restored 2011.03.13. Like all the other Tōkyō-area operators, however, they are running slightly less service than normally scheduled to reduce the load on the power grid.
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