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Old March 22nd, 2011, 07:52 AM   #701
quashlo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nephasto View Post
What about Tohoku shinkansen?
It's the same as for Kyūshū Shinkansen (not 260 km/h, but whatever the top speed is for the line, i.e., 300 km/h currently). I posted some videos a while back of the E5 blowing through some of the smaller stations on the Tōhoku Shinkansen at top speed.
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Old March 22nd, 2011, 07:59 AM   #702
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
I hear plans to reopen Tohoku Shinkansen between Aomori and Morioka on 23rd instant. Can anyone confirm or deny?
At first it was the 23rd.
Now it is the 22nd, but only starting midday (11:20 am, with Hayate 507). So on the 22nd, they will only run 6.5 roundtrips, while on the 23rd, they will do 10 roundtrips.

Also, the Akita Shinkansen "shuttle" between Morioka and Akita has been increased to five roundtrips from four.
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Old March 22nd, 2011, 08:01 AM   #703
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Are there any direct zairaisen trains from Tokyo through Niigata, Uetsu and Ou main lines to Tsugaru tunnel and beyond?
No, not quite. Right now, the detour requires people to transfer at least once, if not more depending on your ultimate destination.


Souce: JR East

Thick green and thick orange is Shinkansen, thin green is zairaisen, blue is bus. Orange circles are airports.
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Old March 23rd, 2011, 09:07 AM   #704
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Tōhoku Shinkansen between Shin-Aomori and Morioka reopened on 2011.03.22. All trains are stopping at all stations, and I believe they are only running E2 series Hayate trains.

TBS news report (2011.03.22):



According to various reports (here), the full length of the Tōhoku Shinkansen could reopen as early as end of next month.

For comparison:
  • In the 2004 Chūetsu Earthquake, there was somewhat extensive damage to four tunnels and some viaducts, but service across the full line was restored in 66 days.
  • In the 1995 Great Hanshin / Awaji (Kōbe) Earthquake, where there was severe damage including some collapsed aerial structures, service across the full line was restored in 81 days.
Similar to what happened in the Kōbe quake, the other JR companies (Central, West, and Kyūshū) are already offering to send their engineers out into the field to assist JR East in the repair work. While the damage is spread over a large area, there are no tunnel or aerial structure collapses, so perhaps we will see a return to service sooner than initially thought.
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Old March 23rd, 2011, 09:12 AM   #705
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Some more pics of the Tōhoku Shinkansen damage. I believe these are all in Iwate Prefecture, in and around Kitakami Station.
Source: http://kenplatz.nikkeibp.co.jp/

Shear failure after flexural yielding at the top of an end column supporting a rigid-frame viaduct (Nakasone No. 1 Viaduct).





The intermediate columns on this viaduct only suffered diagonal cracks. The bending moment is highest at the joint between the top of the column and the beam, causing the diagonal cracking. As the diagonal cracks got progressively larger in the end columns, they ultimately resulted in shear failure. This is the same failure mechanism observed in the Great Hanshin Earthquake. The end columns support simply-supported beam bridges that are used to connect two longer viaducts together, but since these particular columns are shorter, they are more vulnerable to shear failure.



After the Sanriku Minami Earthquake in 2003, JR East has been undertaking seismic reinforcement of rigid-frame viaduct and bridge columns, grouping columns by failure mechanism (“shear failure” or “flexural failure”). JR East had completed seismic reinforcement of columns where shear failure was identified as the primary failure mechanism in March 2009, and from April 2009 had begun seismic reinforcement of columns where flexural failure was identified as the primary failure mechanism. This work covered 12,200 columns and was planned for completion in 2014. It’s likely that these damaged columns were identified as flexural failure columns and were going to receive reinforcement sometime in the future.

Similar failure at another simply-supported beam bridge south of the previous location.



End column on the Toribami No. 5 Viaduct displaying shear cracks perpendicular to the viaduct axis.



Spalling on the viaduct



Okajima No.3 Viaduct was not seismically reinforced but suffered no structural damage. If you ever had questions about why the Shinkansen noise standards are the way they are, this should answer them.



Inohana No. 5 Viaduct, where columns had already been seismically reinforced using aramid fibers and steel casings, came out unscathed. The 2003 Sanriku Minami Earthquake caused severe spalling in end columns and shear cracks in intermediate columns on this viaduct. The damage was repaired by pouring resin into the core concrete, repairing the outer layers of concrete, and encasing the columns in steel tubes. Aramid fiber was also used to provide additional reinforcement.





Some minor corrosion of the steel, perhaps due to high water table.



Waga No. 1 Viaduct, where the upper halves of the columns were also seismically reinforced with steel casings. No major damage here.



Ōki No. 1 Viaduct, also no damage.



Reports from the professors who went out into the field to survey the damage and took these pictures:
http://committees.jsce.or.jp/2011qua...hashi_vol1.pdf
http://wwwcatfish.dpri.kyoto-u.ac.jp...11/report.html

While this is only a small section of the line, it seems like the columns that failed were ones that hadn’t undergone seismic reinforcement yet. The ones that did fared well and came out with no damage for the most part.
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Old March 24th, 2011, 11:59 AM   #706
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Another update, as JR East came out with more concrete predictions on the parts of the network that have yet to reopen:

First, Yamagata Shinkansen between Fukushima and Shinjō will reopen in early April.

As for zairaisen:
  • Tōhoku Main Line (Kōriyama – Motomiya): By end of month
  • Ban’etsu West Line (Kōriyama – Tsugawa): March 26
  • Tadami Line (Aizu Wakamatsu – Aizu Bange): By end of month
  • Ōu Main Line:
    • Fukushima – Yonezawa: Early April
    • Yamagata – Shinjō: Opened March 23
    • Shinjō – Innnai: March 27
  • Senzan Line (Yamadera – Yamagata): Early April
  • Aterazawa Line (Kita-Yamagata – Aterazawa): March 28
  • Rikuu West Line (Shinjō – Amarume): Early April
  • Hachinohe Line (Same – Hashikami): March 24

Well, here’s to the speedy recovery of JR East and the entire Tōhoku region.
”As long as you ride, I’ll be running.”


Source: hisanohisanohisano on YouTube
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Old March 24th, 2011, 12:02 PM   #707
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TV program on N700 Shinkansen trains

The 2011.03.22 episode of Kayō Surprise (“Tuesday Surprise”) was about N700 Shinkansen trains, including a very comprehensive tour of the train-building process at Nippon Sharyō’s plant in Toyokawa City and a test ride inside the new N700 series units for the Kyūshū Shinkansen. Enjoy it before it gets taken down from YouTube.
Source: Mickey326GG on YouTube

Part 1
Overview of the plant, which encompasses seven Tōkyō Domes in area. A look at a preserved 0 series, including the operator’s cab, with old-style speedometer and dashboard. Then an exhibit on the lightweight honeycomb aluminum double-skin exterior, the welding process, and the window-punching machine.



Part 2
They move to another building containing the assembly line to piece together the body of the train, where they get a view of the gantry crane in action. In the next building, they see how the end car is constructed using hundreds of welds and the nose of the train shaped by hand. In the middle, there’s an explanation of the tunnel boom effect and the reason for the shape of the Shinkansen’s nose. Then, a look at some historic scenes on the Shinkansen, including the dining car, as well as some odd scenes including one car converted into a gym and other into a disco bar during the height of the bubble.



Part 3
A look inside a separate building to capture the painting process (this is apparently the first TV footage of the process ever). Then a look at the windows and the large transverser to move the freshly-painted car to another building at the plant where the electrical systems are installed. There are over 2,000 wires in a single car. Then, a look at the bogies, including an explanation of the air springs and tilting mechanism.



Part 4
A tour of a Kyūshū Shinkansen N700 unit, starting with the standard and then green seats, and then the operator’s cab, followed by a short test run at slow speeds inside the plant grounds. The second half follows the transport of one car for a newly-built JR Central unit from Nippon Sharyō’s plant to JR Central’s Hamamatsu factory 45 km away. They watch as Nittsū staff carefully negotiate around one of the tightest intersections on the route.

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Old March 26th, 2011, 05:21 PM   #708
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Some more pics of the Tōhoku Shinkansen damage. I believe these are all in Iwate Prefecture, in and around Kitakami Station.
Source: http://kenplatz.nikkeibp.co.jp/

Shear failure after flexural yielding at the top of an end column supporting a rigid-frame viaduct (Nakasone No. 1 Viaduct).





While this is only a small section of the line, it seems like the columns that failed were ones that hadn’t undergone seismic reinforcement yet. The ones that did fared well and came out with no damage for the most part.
Kobe Earthquake 1995,24Hrs Nonstop Repair Railwaystation in 3Months instead of ............
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Old March 26th, 2011, 10:35 PM   #709
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Mini-shinkansen

Akita Shinkansen mini-shinkansen Komachi trains used not to terminate at Morioka, but continue on Tohoku Shinkansen (to Tokyo).

Are there any plans to open mini-shinkansen through services Akita-Morioka-Aomori?
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Old March 27th, 2011, 04:42 AM   #710
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Akita Shinkansen mini-shinkansen Komachi trains used not to terminate at Morioka, but continue on Tohoku Shinkansen (to Tokyo).

Are there any plans to open mini-shinkansen through services Akita-Morioka-Aomori?
No... An operating plan like that wouldn't really match the travel patterns anyways, either under normal conditions or in the immediate post-disaster timeframe. For people that are allergic to transferring at Morioka, there is also already direct zairaisen service between Akita and Aomori, including four daily roundtrips on the Tsugaru limited express (takes about 2h40m end-to-end), plus a handful of slower services.
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Old March 27th, 2011, 04:58 AM   #711
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JR East’s donation of ex-sleeper trains to the Philippines delayed by disaster
http://globalnation.inquirer.net/new...-to-be-delayed

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MANILA, Philippines—The expansion of the Philippine National Railways’ (PNR) capacity is now in question following likely delays in the delivery of trains donated from Japan, which is still reeling from the recent earthquake and tsunami that killed thousands of people and caused billions of dollars in damage.

But PNR general manager Junio Ragragio said the restoration of the commuter train service to Bicol province would push through as scheduled.

Japan East Railway Co. (JReast) earlier agreed to donate some 50 trains, which it would have otherwise discarded as junk, to the PNR. While the trains were already obsolete for Japan’s standards, these could still be used in the Philippines to meet its needs.

The government has approved the disbursement of around P250 million to cover the shipping costs of the donated trains from Japan to Manila.

“It is very understandable. PNR has immediately expressed its deep concern to its friends at JReast for the events in Japan particularly since the earthquake and tsunami impacted the northeast area, which is a major area of its train operations,” Ragragio said.

He said he had contacted JReast officials, who apologized for the likely delay in the delivery of the donated trains.

“In the face of such magnanimity under the most stressful circumstances, PNR management could only humbly say that JReast must not worry about its donations,” Ragragio said.

He said JReast should instead “focus all its efforts at coping with the terrible tragedy and devastation in the Sendai area.”

JReast, one of the three train operators in Japan, serves the country’s eastern coast, which is the area worst-hit by the tsunami caused by the recent 9.0-magnitude earthquake.

For now, Ragragio said the PNR would focus on the restoration of the train service to Bicol using 10 refurbished sleeper trains that were also donated by Japan.

The PNR has said it plans to spend P1.5 billion for the rehabilitation of train tracks to Bicol to facilitate the faster movement of goods into Manila from key provinces in southern Luzon.
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Old March 27th, 2011, 04:59 AM   #712
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Hauling fuel to the Tōhoku area

Recently, JR Freight has been hauling multiple “emergency” consists of fuel tanks carrying diesel and gasoline up to the Tōhoku area following the earthquake and tsunami, part of an attempt to relieve the fuel shortage in the affected areas. Starting March 25, JR Freight will be sending one train a day, hauling 30 tank cars.

Some videos. The 18-car consists carry about 792,000 liters of gasoline.
Source: SYARAKUKAN on YouTube

The second fuel train, on the Ōu Main Line between Shirasawa and Jimba (2011.03.20). This one departed Negishi (home to Nippon Oil’s Negishi Refinery) in Yokohama on 2011.03.19 at 19:44, bound for Morioka.



The fifth fuel train, at JR Hirosaki Station (2011.03.23). There is someone, perhaps either a Nippon Oil or JR Freight employee, who has been scribbling messages to the Tōhoku region on the back of the last cars on these trains. This one says 「ガンバレ東北」, which means “Never give up, Tōhoku!”

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Old March 27th, 2011, 05:00 AM   #713
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Electric locomotives begin service on Jōtō Freight Line

In other freight-related news, the Jōtō Freight Line switched to electric locomotives on 2011.03.12, and DD51 series diesel locomotives were shifted off the line.

Some video of the last days of the DD51 series units on the Akagawa Bridge across the Yodo River. You can also see an EF66 electric locomotive on the bridge, perhaps doing some testing.

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Old March 27th, 2011, 05:00 AM   #714
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Double-decker Shinkansen to be decommissioned in five years
http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/...na022000c.html

Quote:
Double-decked bullet trains will be decommissioned in five years from the Tohoku and Joetsu Shinkansen lines, their operator said.

The aging Series E-1 and E-4 trains will retire with the introduction of the most advanced Series E-5 trains capable of traveling at 320 kilometers per hour.

Double-decked E-1 and E-4 trains are called Multi-Amenity Express (MAX) trains. East Japan Railway Co. (JR East) introduced the first 12-car E-1 train for its Joetsu Shinkansen Line in July 1994.

Since all carriages are double-decked, the number of the seating capacity per coach was about 40 percent more than ordinary bullet trains that the company operates. Three seats are installed on both sides of the isle on the upper deck. This has helped ease congestion during rush hours and holiday periods.

Each carriage has an elevator for wheelchairs and a certain space on the upper deck is set aside for passengers in wheelchairs. Moreover, E-1 trains have baby beds and powder rooms.

In particular, seats on the upper decks have enjoyed high popularity with passengers because they command fine views. Currently, six E-1 trains, totaling 72 cars, are operated on the Joetsu Shinkansen Line between Tokyo and Niigata.

Eight-car E-4 trains, whose front cars have longer noses than those of the E-1 to prevent them from creating excessive noise when they enter tunnels, made their debut in December 1997. Two eight-car trains can be linked into a 16-carriage train with a total seating capacity of 1,634, the highest in the world.

Twenty-six E-4 trains, totaling 208 coaches, are operated mainly on the Tokyo-Sendai section of the Tohoku Shinkansen Line.

The service life of bullet trains was initially believed to be about 15 years, but it has been extended by about 10 years because of advancements in maintenance technology.

Seventeen years have passed since the first E-1 train was introduced and 14 years since the introduction of the E-4.

However, some passengers have complained to JR East that the upper deck seats cannot be turned around and others call for the expansion of upper deck isles, while others have pointed out that the boarding positions for MAX trains are different from those for other trains and are confusing.

JR East is scheduled to begin decommissioning older E-1 trains in July next year and put all MAX trains out of service in five years.
Missed this one earlier…

I wonder how they plan on dealing with the capacity, since part of the reason for the bi-level design was to accommodate commuter traffic on the Tōhoku and Jōetsu Shinkansen. Perhaps the biggest problem with these units is the maximum speed, which is only 240 kph. At least on the Tōhoku Shinkansen, this is probably a barrier to increasing the speed to 320 kph with the introduction of more and more E5 series trains. However, I’m still left wondering if they might not try and design a new all-double-decker Shinkansen with a higher top speed.
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Old March 27th, 2011, 05:01 AM   #715
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As an aside to castermaild55's post about the Kōbe quake and to give an idea of the work involved...

For the latest quake / tsunami, including JR East and other companies assisting in the work, there are currently approx. 3,500 workers deployed out in the field to repair Shinkansen and zairaisen damage, approx. 2,800 of which are working in areas under the jurisdiction of the Sendai office.
http://www.kahoku.co.jp/news/2011/03/20110324t73010.htm
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Old March 27th, 2011, 06:19 AM   #716
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Nice work quashlo, thanks for great updates and good luck to the workers restoring the damaged lines.
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Old March 27th, 2011, 08:17 AM   #717
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
JR East’s donation of ex-sleeper trains to the Philippines delayed by disaster
http://globalnation.inquirer.net/new...-to-be-delayed
yeah we were really looking forward to these trains, but it's okay.. they obviously have more important things to tackle...

btw, do you have an idea what trains they might give?? i remember reading in the PH forums that it might be 205 series but i'm not sure...

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Old March 27th, 2011, 12:01 PM   #718
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Double-decker Shinkansen to be decommissioned in five years
http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/news/...na022000c.html
That answers some of the questions I asked a while back.
Wonder if we will see the return to 16 car trains on the Joetsu since the line is built to handle them, maybe even on the Tohoku line (all the trains that isn't connected with mini Shinkansen trains)...
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Old March 28th, 2011, 08:17 AM   #719
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btw, do you have an idea what trains they might give?? i remember reading in the PH forums that it might be 205 series but i'm not sure...

Sorry, I just realized I should have put the article in the urban thread and removed "ex-sleeper" from the title. For some reason, I immediately thought they were going to be sleeper cars like the 14 series, since that's what JR has typically given to the Philippines.

In reality, I believe these are going to be 203 series units which have been retired from the Jōban Local Line / Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line with the introduction of new E233 series trains. Indonesia (KRL Jabotabek) is already getting 20 of these cars.
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Old March 28th, 2011, 10:35 AM   #720
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Sorry, I just realized I should have put the article in the urban thread and removed "ex-sleeper" from the title. For some reason, I immediately thought they were going to be sleeper cars like the 14 series, since that's what JR has typically given to the Philippines.

In reality, I believe these are going to be 203 series units which have been retired from the Jōban Local Line / Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line with the introduction of new E233 series trains. Indonesia (KRL Jabotabek) is already getting 20 of these cars.
thanks!
this is just as an aside anyway...

ah 203, they still look nice! and they will certainly be helpful in alleviating overcrowding on the commuter line...

we only have 6 DMUs (from SK, Hyundai Rotem) right now, and the present headway is around half an hour IIRC...
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