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Old March 28th, 2011, 08:34 PM   #721
chornedsnorkack
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Another update, as JR East came out with more concrete predictions on the parts of the network that have yet to reopen:

First, Yamagata Shinkansen between Fukushima and Shinjō will reopen in early April.
What is the condition of Tohoku Shinkansen between Fukushima and Nasu-Shiobara?
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Old March 28th, 2011, 09:25 PM   #722
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As of 2011.03.28:

Progress on repairs:

Code:
Damage                                    Locations   Repaired
======                                    =========   ========
Bent, fallen, or cracked overhead masts       ~540      ~30%
Severed catenary                              ~470      ~40%
Damaged viaduct and bridge columns            ~100      100%
Warped or damaged track                        ~20      100%
Damaged transformer equipment                  ~10      ~60%
Fallen, bent, or spalled soundwalls            ~10      100%
Damaged or fallen ceiling materials       5 stations    ~80%
Displaced bridge girders                         2      ~50%
Damaged bridge girder supports                 ~30      ~90%
Track damage inside tunnels                      2      ~50%
=======================================   =========   ========
TOTAL                                       ~1,200      ~45%
Timeline for reopening:
  • Tōhoku Shinkansen
    • Tōkyō – Nasu Shiobara: Reopened 2011.03.12
    • Nasu Shiobara – Fukushima: Will reopen mid-April
    • Fukushima - Ichinoseki: Will reopen late April
    • Ichinoseki – Morioka: Will reopen 2011.04.08
    • Morioka – Shin-Aomori: Reopened 2011.03.22
  • Yamagata Shinkansen:
    • Fukushima - Shinjō: Will reopen 2011.03.31
  • Akita Shinkansen:
    • Akita – Morioka: Reopened 2011.03.18
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Old March 29th, 2011, 02:01 PM   #723
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
In reality, I believe these are going to be 203 series units which have been retired from the Jōban Local Line / Tōkyō Metro Chiyoda Line with the introduction of new E233 series trains. Indonesia (KRL Jabotabek) is already getting 20 of these cars.
By the way, there is an English Wikipedia article for the 203 series. It says that 17 ten car sets were built, which implies that KRL Jabotabek is getting two sets.

Unlike KRL Jabotabek, PNR wouldn't be able to use 203 series trains as EMUs. They'll have to turn them into locomotive-hauled carriages, unless they can do something clever like converting the intermediate cars to work with their Rotem DMUs.
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Old March 29th, 2011, 05:37 PM   #724
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gag Halfrunt View Post
By the way, there is an English Wikipedia article for the 203 series. It says that 17 ten car sets were built, which implies that KRL Jabotabek is getting two sets.

Unlike KRL Jabotabek, PNR wouldn't be able to use 203 series trains as EMUs. They'll have to turn them into locomotive-hauled carriages, unless they can do something clever like converting the intermediate cars to work with their Rotem DMUs.
no they wouldn't, the line is not electrified... they are actually in the process of refurbishing locomotives for this reason...

(quashloo) forgive me for hijacking this thread, i was merely being curious...
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Old March 31st, 2011, 10:13 AM   #725
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Some updates on the latest news:

Today (2011.03.31), Yamagata Shinkansen reopened between Shinjō and Fukushima. In about two weeks, we should hopefully start to see through-service with the re-opening of the Nasu–Shiobara – Fukushima section of the Tōhoku Shinkansen. TBS news report:



Recent clips of Tōhoku Shinkansen trains (2011.03.25) at Tōkyō Station operating on a special schedule as a result of the earthquake damage. Currently, only Nasuno (all-stop) services are running at the Tōkyō end of the line, to and from Nasu–Shiobara. The special schedule has about 1-2 tph per direction. They have 200 series, E2 series, E3 series, and E4 series running the service, but all the seats are non-reserved, perhaps because they cannot or do not want to issue reserved seats right now.


Source: karibajct on YouTube

A few updates on some smaller local railways:

Hitachi Naka Kaihin Railway
First, Hitachi Naka Kaihin Railway (a small, local railway in the Mito area) announced that it will take them until July to fully re-open due to damage. This is a struggling third-sector railway that was spun off from a private transit operator Ibaraki Kōtsū and is hanging on by threads like many third-sector (publicly-funded) local lines. Damage on the 14.3 km line between Katsuta and Ajigaura will take over ¥200 million to repair the damage:
  • Warped rail: 13 locations
  • Ground subsidence or landslides near cliffs: 7 locations
  • Damaged platforms: 5 locations
They will also lose another ¥35 million as a result of having to operate replacement bus service during the downtime, as well as lost farebox revenue from lower ridership levels.
http://mainichi.jp/area/ibaraki/news...40191000c.html

Sanriku Railway
Repair work on the Tarō – Omoto section of Sanriku Railway’s Kita-Rias Line (71.0 km) in Iwate Prefecture was completed on 2011.03.28, and service on this section was restored on 2011.03.29. This is in addition to the Miyako – Tarō and Kuji – Rikuchū Noda sections, where service has already been restored. Overall, service is still limited (only 3 daily roundtrips on the sections that are open), and today (2011.03.31) is the last day of the no-fare period, which was intended to help residents in the disaster area access goods and services for the time being (tsunami damaged a lot of cars). No news yet on when the remaining 34.8 km section between Omoto and Rikuchū Noda, or the Minami-Rias Line (36.6 km), will reopen.
http://www.iwate-np.co.jp/cgi-bin/to...cgi?20110328_5

TBS news report (2011.03.28):



Kashima Rinkai Railway
Mito – Ōarai section will reopen 2011.04.02, Taiyō – Kashima Soccer Stadium section on 2011.04.07, Ōarai – Shin-Hokota section on 2011.04.08, all at 30 to 50 percent of normal schedules. Shin-Hokota – Taiyō section will be out of commission until late June, replaced with bus service.

Other than these, there’s a slew of other lines including the Abukuma Express Railway, Mooka Railway, freight lines, and a bunch of JR passenger lines where no specific timeline for reopening has been determined yet.
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Old April 5th, 2011, 02:04 PM   #726
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
As of 2011.03.28:

Progress on repairs:

Code:
Damage                                    Locations   Repaired
======                                    =========   ========
Damaged bridge girder supports                 ~30      ~90%
=======================================   =========
How many bridge girder supports are awaiting repairs now?
Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Timeline for reopening:
  • Tōhoku Shinkansen
    • Ichinoseki – Morioka: Will reopen 2011.04.08
  • Yamagata Shinkansen:
    • Fukushima - Shinjō: Will reopen 2011.03.31
Yamagata Shinkansen has opened as scheduled.
Is Morioka-Ichinoseki on schedule for reopening this Friday the 8th?
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Old April 6th, 2011, 07:39 PM   #727
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
How many bridge girder supports are awaiting repairs now?
As of 2011.04.04:
Code:
Damage                                    Locations   Repaired
======                                    =========   ========
Bent, fallen, or cracked overhead masts       ~540      ~70%
Severed catenary                              ~470      ~70%
Damaged viaduct and bridge columns            ~100      100%
Warped or damaged track                        ~20      100%
Damaged transformer equipment                  ~10      ~85%
Fallen, bent, or spalled soundwalls            ~10      100%
Damaged or fallen ceiling materials       5 stations    ~80%
Displaced bridge girders                         2      100%
Damaged bridge girder supports                 ~30      100%
Track damage inside tunnels                      2      100%
=======================================   =========   ========
TOTAL                                       ~1,200      ~75%
This report was three days ago. I think they are not providing the damage / repair updates as frequently because the work is almost done, and things have somewhat settled down. Comparing to the progress made between the 2011.03.28 report, the remaining items in the list that are less than 100 have probably progressed another 5% since this latest report.

Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Is Morioka-Ichinoseki on schedule for reopening this Friday the 8th?
They pushed it forward one day. It will open today (2011.04.07).
Nasu–Shiobara to Fukushima will reopen around 2011.04.12.
TBS news report (2011.04.04):

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Old April 6th, 2011, 08:13 PM   #728
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Shinkansen trains begin braking 9 seconds before shaking
http://www3.nhk.or.jp/news/html/2011...118701000.html

Quote:
In the latest earthquake, the system that promptly detects vibrations from an earthquake was activated on the Tōhoku Shinkansen. It was revealed that trains began applying emergency brakes and decelerating nine seconds before the first shaking and 1 minute, 10 seconds before the most violent shaking. JR East believes the system helped avoid any derailments on the Shinkansen, and is proceeding with detailed analysis of the data.

At the time the earthquake struck, 27 trains with passengers on board were in operation on the Tōhoku Shinkansen, but all came to a stop without derailing. JR East has installed seismographs at nine locations along the Tōhoku Shinkansen and other spots, including along the Pacific Coast in Miyako, Iwate Prefecture and the Oshika Peninsula in Miyagi Prefecture. This earthquake early warning system immediately detects vibrations from earthquakes and forces trains to slow down. In the latest earthquake, a seismograph on the Oshika Peninsula—about 50 km from the Tōhoku Shinkansen tracks—detected a peak ground acceleration at 2:47:03 pm of 120 gals, the threshold for stopping train operations. As a result, the system automatically shut off power in the overhead systems and all Shinkansen trains simultaneously applied emergency brakes and began deceleration. Of these, Hayate 27 and Yamabiko 61 were running on the section between Sendai Station—where trackside seismographs detected the highest ground acceleration—and Furukawa Station, one station north. After analyzing the data, JR East says that the first shaking from the earthquake came nine to twelve seconds after the trains applied their brakes, while the most violent shaking came 1 minute, 10 seconds after the trains applied their brakes. It’s unclear just how much the Shinkansen trains were able to decelerate, but given that trains had begun deceleration before strong shaking, JR East believes the system prevented possible derailments, and is proceeding with more detailed analysis of the data.
The NHK article also has a video if you follow the link. It has some footage of the shaking at Sendai Station and stopped trains on the line.

I'm interested in knowing what the peak ground acceleration was on the critical section near Sendai. Apparently, in the Chūetsu Earthquake, the Jōetsu Shinkansen train that derailed was hit with around 1,500 gals.
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Old April 7th, 2011, 12:11 AM   #729
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Some time ago I did a simple spreadsheet which relates deceleration and speed to obtain the distance a train needs to stop, assuming constant deceleration.

Quote:
Originally Posted by entfe001 View Post
Now I don't find emergency decelerations for the Tōhoku trainsets, however if it is 1 m/s² then it'll need 83,33 seconds to stop from running at 300 kph, if different simply multiply the deceleration by 83,33 to calculate it, it's linear.

More generically, for a train running at X kph with D as the emergency deceleration in m/s², it'll need D*X/3,6 seconds to stop. If the deceleration is given in km/h/s it's simplier: D*X.

If I find the emergency decelerations and top speed for each particular series then I'll calculate the approximate speed when the strongest quake wave struck and how much the train travelled unter those circumstances until stopping.
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Old April 7th, 2011, 03:51 AM   #730
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
I'm interested in knowing what the peak ground acceleration was on the critical section near Sendai. Apparently, in the Chūetsu Earthquake, the Jōetsu Shinkansen train that derailed was hit with around 1,500 gals.
As you may already know the amount of ground acceleration is secondary to the derailment during Chuetsu earthquake, direct cause is distance to the epicenter.
The monitors that measures seismic activities initiating the automatic shutdown registers and calculates the strength of P waves which propagates faster than the more devastating S waves. If a train is unfortunate to travel near the epicenter of a quake when it occurs then the time difference between S waves and P waves hitting the train will be too small to make a difference in deceleration as it hits the emergency brakes.
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Old April 8th, 2011, 01:17 AM   #731
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Breaking news: Once again shinkansen and other train serivces in tohuko region are suspended again due to magnitude 7.1 earthquake last night ( 04-07-11), according to east japan railways the services will resume upon the routine safety check up in the all facilities.
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Old April 13th, 2011, 09:07 AM   #732
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Tōhoku Shinkansen between Fukushima and Nasu–Shiobara, between Morioka and Shin-Aomori reopens

In the latest milestone in the restoration of Tōhoku Shinkansen service after the earthquake, the section between Fukushima and Nasu–Shiobara reopened yesterday (2011.04.12). Yamabiko services were reinstated, as was through-servicing Yamagata Shinkansen Tsubasa services, which up until now have only been running on the Ōu Main Line (the conventional half of the line) between Shinjō and Fukushima. The current schedule

TBS news report (2011.04.12).
There was some worry surrounding the aftershocks on 2011.04.11, but there was no damage and no disruption to service as a result of that quake. However, another aftershock the morning of the first day caused some minor service disruptions, with Tsubasa 101 arriving 18 minutes late at Fukushima Station.



Yamabiko and Tsubasa trains at Tōkyō Station (2011.04.12):


Source: karibajct on YouTube

In the second bit of news, the JMA 6+ (M7.1) aftershock on the evening of 2011.04.07 resulted in additional damage to the Tōhoku Shinkansen. An additional 550 damaged locations were identified along the line.

The Ichinoseki – Shin-Aomori section of the line had already been reopened following the large earthquake on 2011.03.11 (ironically the Ichinoseki – Fukushima section had just reopened the afternoon of 2011.04.07), but service was suspended again after the aftershock. They have since finished repairs on the Morioka – Shin-Aomori section and restored service there today (2011.04.13). The Ichinoseki – Morioka section will reopen 2011.04.24.

TBS news report (2011.04.11):
The Fukushima – Sendai section of the line will reopen in two weeks on 2011.04.27, and the last section between Sendai and Ichinoseki will reopen early May.



And the last bit of news:
Yesterday (2011.04.12), they also restored zairaisen (i.e., Tōhoku Main Line) service between Fukushima and Sendai. JR East is running a special “relay” train (the so-called “relay” trains are typically operated as connecting zairaisen trains to / from Shinkansen, such as the now defunct Relay Tsubame) between Fukushima and Sendai. This isn’t a limited express service though, and is just designated as a kaisoku (rapid), using typical suburban / commuter EMUs, with 16 trips a day. With the relay service started up, the trip between Sendai and Tōkyō is as short as 3 hours, 2 minutes.

TV Tōkyō news report (2011.04.12):


Source: sala570602 on YouTube
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Old April 13th, 2011, 09:08 AM   #733
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Tsunami washed away 23 JR stations
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/dy/national/T110401004996.htm

Quote:
Tsunami washed away at least 23 railway stations in the Tohoku region following the earthquake that hit the country's northeast on March 11, East Japan Railway Co. has announced.

JR East has been checking damage caused by the disaster to seven rail routes in Fukushima, Miyagi, Iwate and Aomori prefectures.

To date, the company has found about 680 places where the tracks were damaged on the seven lines.

Damage to station buildings was most serious on the Kesennuma Line. Facilities at nine stations, including those at Shizukawa and Utatsu, were washed away.

A number of other stations--four on the Yamada Line; six on the Ofunato Line; one on the Ishinomaki Line and three on the Joban Line--also were washed away, according to JR East.

Portions of the tracks were washed out by tsunami or buried under rubble at 18 points on the seven lines, which also include the Hachinohe and Senseki lines. The damaged sections total about 22 kilometers. There also were about 160 places where the tracks were bent by tsunami.

Among the seven lines, track damage was most serious on the Joban Line. Between Iwaki Station in Iwaki, Fukushima Prefecture, and Watari Station in Wataricho, Miyagi Prefecture, about 400 damaged places were found. However, this section includes areas where JR East has not been able to conduct surveys as they lie within 30 kilometers of the troubled Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.

On the Ofunato Line, the company has checked only about 10 percent of the tracks. In all, the company has finished inspections on only half the tracks on the seven lines.
Because of the situation at Fukushima No. 1 power plant, they have yet to completely inspect the remaining sections of the Jōban Line, so the stats are still expected to increase a bit. However, in a bit of good news for local residents in the areas, the president of JR East has formally said that they will not abandon any of the seven lines damaged in the earthquakes and tsunami and fully intend to repair all the damage.

The scene at JR Shinchi Station (2011.04.05).
This is the location of the disabled four-car Jōban Line train, twisted and turned over by the tsunami. The station is barely recognizable, other than the platform bridge.


Source: shidouzami09 on YouTube
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Old April 13th, 2011, 10:40 AM   #734
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post

And the last bit of news:
Yesterday (2011.04.12), they also restored zairaisen (i.e., Tōhoku Main Line) service between Fukushima and Sendai. JR East is running a special “relay” train (the so-called “relay” trains are typically operated as connecting zairaisen trains to / from Shinkansen, such as the now defunct Relay Tsubame) between Fukushima and Sendai. This isn’t a limited express service though, and is just designated as a kaisoku (rapid), using typical suburban / commuter EMUs, with 16 trips a day. With the relay service started up, the trip between Sendai and Tōkyō is as short as 3 hours, 2 minutes.

Precisely which stretches of zairaisen Tohoku Main Line are damaged and shut as of now, and which are operating?
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Old April 13th, 2011, 03:50 PM   #735
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chornedsnorkack View Post
Precisely which stretches of zairaisen Tohoku Main Line are damaged and shut as of now, and which are operating?
Check this map (as of Tue. 4/12):
http://www.jreast.co.jp/pdf/saikaijoukyou.pdf
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Old April 13th, 2011, 07:02 PM   #736
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post

TBS news report (2011.04.11):
The Fukushima – Sendai section of the line will reopen in two weeks on 2011.04.27, and the last section between Sendai and Ichinoseki will reopen early May.



And the last bit of news:
Yesterday (2011.04.12), they also restored zairaisen (i.e., Tōhoku Main Line) service between Fukushima and Sendai.
What is the current condition of Tohoku Shinkansen between Fukushima and Sendai? What kind of damage did that stretch suffer that zairaisen Tohoku Main Line escape or could be repaired from?
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Old April 13th, 2011, 08:07 PM   #737
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Probably structural. The zairaisen are mostly at ground level while Shinkansen is on viaduct.

There were ~390 specific damage locations between Fukushima and Sendai following the March 11 quake, all but ~10 of which had already been repaired before the April 7 aftershock, which added another ~140 locations.
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Old April 13th, 2011, 10:27 PM   #738
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Japanese bid for California HSR unaffected by quake
http://mdn.mainichi.jp/mdnnews/busin...bu054000c.html

Quote:
TOKYO (Kyodo) -- The chief of the California High Speed Rail Authority brushed aside a view Tuesday that Japanese bidders for the state's railway projects could take a blow from the partial suspension of shinkansen bullet train services in the wake of the March 11 mega quake.

"They did an excellent job. They didn't lose one person," CHSRA chief executive officer Roelof van Ark said. He was speaking at a news conference for a forum the CHSRA held to inform prospective bidders on the initial 200-kilometer segment of the planned 1,300-km railway.

Japanese firms such as Kawasaki Heavy Industries Ltd. and East Japan Railway Co., whose Tohoku Shinkansen Line remains partially closed in quake-hit areas, are among 49 teams and firms that have expressed interest in bidding on large contracts to design and build the segment.

The initial stretch of railway will be divided into several contracts worth $250 million to $1 billion.

The CHSRA said it plans to announce short-listed companies by the end of the year and award contracts in the third quarter of 2012.
There's a lot of impetus for the California project... Hopefully the budget cuts don't kill it off.
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Old April 14th, 2011, 05:25 PM   #739
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Probably structural. The zairaisen are mostly at ground level while Shinkansen is on viaduct.

There were ~390 specific damage locations between Fukushima and Sendai following the March 11 quake, all but ~10 of which had already been repaired before the April 7 aftershock, which added another ~140 locations.
What is the condition of zairaisen Tohoku Main Line between Sendai and Morioka, and are there any plans to repair it?
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Old April 14th, 2011, 08:07 PM   #740
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Sendai – Ichinoseki will reopen around 2011.04.21
Iwakiri – Rifu will reopen around 2011.04.21
Ichinoseki – Mizusawa will reopen today (2011.04.15)

Mizusawa – Morioka is already in service.
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