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Old April 15th, 2011, 03:19 PM   #741
Attus
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Probably structural. The zairaisen are mostly at ground level while Shinkansen is on viaduct.

There were ~390 specific damage locations between Fukushima and Sendai following the March 11 quake, all but ~10 of which had already been repaired before the April 7 aftershock, which added another ~140 locations.
Earthquakes every day... Magnitudo 6 - 7. It's unbelievable. You may think the Earth wanna throw Japan away. It's simply heroic what Japanese people do by roads and railways.
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Old April 18th, 2011, 09:58 AM   #742
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Final segment of Kyūshū Shinkansen’s Kagoshima route opens: Part 2

Finally getting back to the opening of the Kyūshū Shinkansen. The mood surrounding the extension has mostly been subdued as a result of the disaster in northeastern Japan, and with people less likely to travel, ridership has also taken a hit. But the latest milestone in the Shinkansen network still deserves more coverage than I have given it so far.

First, a quick photo tour from Kagoshima Chūō to Hakata and back.
Source: http://ameblo.jp/maimai24/

Our goal: JR Hakata Station



But we start off at Kagoshima Chūō Station, where N700 series trains are lined up.



Sakura 406 bound for Hakata



Passing Kurume



In no time, we’re at Hakata, the main intercity terminal for Fukuoka City…



Departure boards for Platforms 13 and 14.
There are also departures out of Platform 12 (Hakata is a six-track stration).



An 800 series waiting at the platform…



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Old April 18th, 2011, 09:59 AM   #743
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Final segment of Kyūshū Shinkansen’s Kagoshima route opens: Part 3

The newly expanded JR Hakata Station (i.e., JR Hakata City).



Hard to know which I like better: the new Ōsaka Station or the new Hakata Station…





Rooftop park and retail corner



Looking down Taihaku-dōri



New station plaza





JR Hakata City includes a lot of firsts for Kyūshū, including general merchandiser Tōkyū Hands.



Limited express trains at the station, including an 885 series Kamome.



Sakura 427 for Kagoshima Chūō





Rainbow banner advertising the opening

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Old April 18th, 2011, 10:00 AM   #744
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Final segment of Kyūshū Shinkansen’s Kagoshima route opens: Part 4 (Shin-Tosu)

Next is a series of tours of the new intermediate stations.
First up is Shin-Tosu Station in Saga Prefecture (2011.03.12).
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/banybogy/
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/banybogy/



Shin-Tosu is a four-track station, designed as such should the Nagasaki route of the Kyūshū Shinkansen ever take off.



Definitely one of my favorites among the new stations, as it puts some spin on the typical box design.





The station has a Family Mart inside (as evidenced by this delivery truck)… Should be a nice amenity once the immediate vicinity around the station fills out with new homes.





Zairaisen (Nagasaki Main Line) station. This is a new station that opened specifically to allow for transfers with the Shinkansen. It’s only a two-track station, but all trains from locals to limited expresses stop at the station.



The earthquake and tsunami put a damper on the special ceremonies, but this flower art (“Welcome to Tosu”) was still on display.

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Old April 18th, 2011, 10:02 AM   #745
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Final segment of Kyūshū Shinkansen’s Kagoshima route opens: Part 5 (Shin-Tosu)



Through the faregates a short way is this porcelain model of a Sakura train, made using a local style of porcelain art from Saga Prefecture (Arita-style). Not your typical train model…



Central area of the station is completely covered with a high canopy. The support bracing looks quite thin and elegant, an aesthetic improvement over similar designs in recent memory (e.g., Asahikawa Station).



Tsubame departs the station.



At the ends of the platform, the station canopy switches to individual platform canopies.



Another set (2011.03.26):
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/yuukiyamate2008/
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/yuukiyamate2008/

Station concourse



N700 series R9 on Sakura 553 arrives at Platform 13.



Transfer gates to the Nagasaki Main Line. To the right is a standing udon noodle shop, keeping the tradition alive.



The station exterior is designed to look like the wings of a magpie (official bird of Saga Prefecture).



Plum blossoms + Sakura (cherry blossom) from the nearby Asahiyama Park

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Old April 18th, 2011, 10:03 AM   #746
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Final segment of Kyūshū Shinkansen’s Kagoshima route opens: Part 6 (Shin-Tosu)

Final set (2011.03.13):
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/norimiyahara/
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/norimiyahara/

Station and surrounds from Asahiyama Park. For the time being, this is Saga Prefecture’s only Shinkansen station, but that will change if the Nagasaki route moves forward.





Commemorative ticket (¥160). These events are always good for collectibles.





From certain angles and in certain lighting, the blue-tinge paint scheme really shows…





Shinkansen trains are always popular with the kids… Or maybe these are just railfan dads forcing their kids and wives to come with them?



Service track is on the left

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Old April 18th, 2011, 10:03 AM   #747
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Final segment of Kyūshū Shinkansen’s Kagoshima route opens: Part 7 (Kurume)

Next stop: Kurume Station.
Source: http://blogs.dion.ne.jp/fkuru/



The station has a pretty extensive stained glass installation, both along the walls and in the skylights of the east-west public passage.



“Fireworks on the Chikugo River and Rape Blossoms”



“Suitengū Shrine, Fireworks on the Chikugo River, and Bairinji Temple”



Another set, late afternoon 2011.03.12:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/norimiyahara/
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/norimiyahara/

A fair amount of people out at the station plaza, despite the events the day before. Perhaps not surprising given how much local cities have invested in the new line, both directly (construction, etc.) and indirectly (tourism).



As the tourist gateway to Kurume, a few monuments were placed at the station plaza, including this large musical clock that looks like a taiko drum. Every hour, there is some music by local Kurume-area artists (e.g., The Checkers) and a mechanical doll setup pops out. The monument honors local Kurume legend Tanaka Hisashige, an inventor during the Edo and Meiji periods who has been called the “Thomas Edison of the Orient”.



Off to the side a bit is another monument, dedicated to another local Kurume legend and the world’s largest tiremaker: Bridgestone. “Bridgestone” is the character-by-character translation of the founder’s name, 石橋 “Ishibashi”.



Notice about postponed ceremonies to celebrate the Shinkansen opening.



East-west public passage inside the station. Lots of flowers inside, likely brought in for the festivities that never materialized.





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Old April 18th, 2011, 10:04 AM   #748
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Final segment of Kyūshū Shinkansen’s Kagoshima route opens: Part 8 (Kurume)

Another set:
Source: http://chikugogawa.blog25.fc2.com/

A small monument with a rāmen cart. Kurume is the birthplace of tonkotsu rāmen.



Tsubame stopped at the station.



Sakura passing the station.







Some zoom shots from atop Asahiyama Park (2011.04.09).
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/d6028/

An N700 series unit has crossed the Chikugo River, bound for Shin-Tosu.



An 800 series unit heading for Kurume, just across the river.



To be continued…
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Old April 18th, 2011, 10:06 AM   #749
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As a bit of an aside, the CMs produced by JR Kyūshū to celebrate the opening of the Shinkansen—especially the “All-Kyūshū Wave” CM—seem to be enjoying new popularity now, as the theme of the series (unity) is particularly apt following the events in northeast Japan.

Here’s all the full-length spots for each station strung together in one 24-minute long video.
Crazy to think how many people came out for this…

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Old April 18th, 2011, 01:27 PM   #750
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Quote:
The support bracing looks quite thin and elegant, an aesthetic improvement over similar designs in recent memory (e.g., Asahikawa Station).
In Asahikawa's defense, I don't think Shin-Tosu has to deal with massive snowfall...
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Old April 18th, 2011, 02:10 PM   #751
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Frequency

How many trains daily travel between Kagoshima and Hakata (thus not counting trains terminating in Kumamoto etc.)?

How many trains daily travel between Kagoshima and Osaka?
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Old April 18th, 2011, 03:49 PM   #752
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Quote:
How many trains daily travel between Kagoshima and Hakata (thus not counting trains terminating in Kumamoto etc.)?
Not counting special trains, I count 34 in the down direction towards Kagoshima. I assume a similar number in the up direction.

Quote:
How many trains daily travel between Kagoshima and Osaka?
Sakura: 11 in up/down direction
Mizuho: 3 in down direction
4 in up direction
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Old April 18th, 2011, 09:28 PM   #753
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Final segment of Kyūshū Shinkansen’s Kagoshima route opens: Part 2

Finally getting back to the opening of the Kyūshū Shinkansen. The mood surrounding the extension has mostly been subdued as a result of the disaster in northeastern Japan, and with people less likely to travel, ridership has also taken a hit.
What have the load factors been like at rush hour?
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Old April 19th, 2011, 04:18 AM   #754
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Err… No idea. Not really sure there’s a well-defined “rush hour” either. Here’s what they have released:

Average train capacity utilization for the first month (2011.03.12 to 2011.04.11):
Code:
                          Shin-Ōsaka through-trains    Kyūshū-only trains      
                          =========================  =======================  TOTAL
Section                    Mizuho   Sakura   Total   Mizuho   Sakura   Total  
=========================  ======   ======   =====   ======   ======   =====  =====
Hakata – Kumamoto            58%     65%      63%      43%     23%      32%    41%
Kumamoto – Kagoshima Chūō    35%     45%      42%      40%     19%      33%    37%
Ridership for the first month by section:
  • Hakata – Kumamoto: 746,000 passengers (24,100 avg. daily); 130% of pre-Shinkansen (2010)
  • Kumamoto – Kagoshima Chūō: 430,000 (13,900 avg. daily); 155% of pre-Shinkansen (2010)
Source: http://www13.jrkyushu.co.jp/newsrele...1?OpenDocument
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Old April 19th, 2011, 09:29 AM   #755
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Full length of Tōhoku Shinkansen will reopen early, April 30
http://www.kahoku.co.jp/news/2011/04/20110419t73014.htm

Quote:
On April 18, JR East announced that it will reopen the Fukushima – Sendai section of the Tōhoku Shinkansen, currently suspended as a result of the Great East Japan Earthquake, on April 25. The railway will accelerate the original schedule, which had the section reopening on April 27, linking together Tōkyō and Sendai. Around April 30, the full length of the line between Tōkyō and Shin-Aomori is expected to reopen, marking the restoration of a major artery through the Tōhoku region during the holiday period.

The Ichinoseki – Morioka section will reopen on April 23, while the Sendai – Ichinoseki section—originally scheduled to reopen in early May—will reopen around April 30. The full length of the line will reopen approx. 50 days after the earthquake struck on March 11.

For the time being, the railway will operate a temporary schedule with a reduced number of trains and slow zones on portions of the line. Together with the opening of the section between Tōkyō and Sendai, the railway will operate special connecting rapid trains between Sendai and Ichinoseki.

In regards to operations of the new E5 series Hayabusa, which had been suspended following the earthquake, JR East spokespersons say that nothing yet has been decided at the moment.

According to the railway, damage was identified at approx. 1,200 locations on the Tōhoku Shinkansen as a result of the earthquake on March 11. Afterwards, the aftershock on the evening of April 7 resulted in damage at an additional 550 locations. Damage was especially severe on the Fukushima – Morioka section, but as of April 17, approx. 85% of the damage had been repaired.

While Shinkansen operations in the Tōhoku region had already been restored on the Ichinoseki – Shin-Aomori section following the March 11 earthquake, the April 7 aftershock forced service to be suspended again. Service between Tōkyō and Fukushima was restored on April 12, and service between Morioka and Shin-Aomori was restored on April 13.

ANN news report (2011.04.18):

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Old April 19th, 2011, 01:39 PM   #756
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Hard to know which I like better: the new Ōsaka Station or the new Hakata Station…
I was in the new Hakata station a few weeks ago. I really liked it. It was probably one of the nicest stations I've been in. I haven't been to the new Osaka one yet though; I'll have to make a trip in the near future. I think in general JR Kyushu has good design and aesthetics.
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Old April 19th, 2011, 02:26 PM   #757
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I see that the loads of Kyushu Shinkansen mean 8 cars is enough most of day.

Is Kyushu Shinkansen physically passable for 16 car trains? Would it be technically possible for a couple of 16 car trains per day to travel Kyushu Shinkansen, say at rush hours?
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Old April 19th, 2011, 11:01 PM   #758
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No, 16 cars train can't go on to the Kyushu Shinkansen (technically they probably could) but all the stations are built for 8 car trains (200 meters in length), which means that half the train would not have a platform for people to get of at...
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Old April 21st, 2011, 06:58 AM   #759
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JR East airs post-earthquake CM

JR East recently began airing a new CM following the earthquake and tsunami, with the catchphrase, “Let’s reconnect Japan.”

“Re-joining rails and reconnecting towns—not a moment wasted.
As a railway, that’s the best we can do, but we have faith that our efforts will help someone, somewhere.”
“Working to reopen the Tōhoku Shinkansen as fast as we can...
Let’s reconnect Japan. JR East."



Source: Sukasen on YouTube

I wonder if 10, 15 years from now, we will see something like this, but by JR East:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zOeXc_v0Mvk
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Old April 23rd, 2011, 09:16 AM   #760
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Quote:
Originally Posted by quashlo View Post
Sendai – Ichinoseki will reopen around 2011.04.21
Iwakiri – Rifu will reopen around 2011.04.21
Ichinoseki – Mizusawa will reopen today (2011.04.15)

Mizusawa – Morioka is already in service.
Is it all in service now?
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