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Old September 12th, 2011, 03:56 PM   #941
NeuDen
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Thanks for all of the fantastic posts quashlo.

Quick question:
Does anyone know why the E5 went from plug doors back to sliding doors again? Or the reason why none of the Shinkansen series use plug doors at all?

It seems like for years the Japanese have been experimenting with plug doors, only to return to the sliding doors. Is it cost? Maintenance?
It seems like plug doors would fit better on the E5 and E6 considering that JR East went through the trouble to develop hoods between the cars to reduce noise.

Any insight would be appreciated.
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Old September 13th, 2011, 04:43 PM   #942
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NeuDen View Post
Thanks for all of the fantastic posts quashlo.

Quick question:
Does anyone know why the E5 went from plug doors back to sliding doors again? Or the reason why none of the Shinkansen series use plug doors at all?

It seems like for years the Japanese have been experimenting with plug doors, only to return to the sliding doors. Is it cost? Maintenance?
It seems like plug doors would fit better on the E5 and E6 considering that JR East went through the trouble to develop hoods between the cars to reduce noise.

Any insight would be appreciated.

This is something that I have long wondered about Japanese rolling stock in general, surely sliding doors add a little more air resistance? (Maybe they weigh less?) Not to mention that they don't look very good either.
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Old September 13th, 2011, 06:11 PM   #943
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According to the images I have seen on Wikipedia then the 500, E3 and the early E2 all have plug doors, but they have since returned to standard sliding doors for future trains. All of these trains were introduced in 1997 and aimed for the the highest speed services. Also looking at some newer designs N700 and E5 you can see that the drivers door and the passenger doors on the end cars that are next to it are plug doors as well.
Maybe they have figured out that you don't need them on the rest of the train since they are located in a turbulent layer of air on the side of the train and only the ones near the end is what really matters at high speed 300+ km/h. Could also be cost, maintenance or just that they have more experience with them.

Also I'm pretty sure that the gaps between cars, around boogies, etc. generate a lot more noise than the little depression over a door.
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Old September 13th, 2011, 07:36 PM   #944
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Sliding doors are more reliable.
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Old September 16th, 2011, 09:32 AM   #945
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E5 series coming to Yamabiko and Hayate services

Official press release:
http://www.jreast.co.jp/press/2011/20110912.pdf

Starting 2011.11.19, the E5 series currently running exclusively on Hayabusa services on the Tōhoku Shinkansen will also be introduced onto a portion of Yamabiko (slow) and Hayate (semi-fast) services, with three additional E5 series trains entering service (bringing the total to 6). We should now gradually start to see them take over all the Tōhoku Shinkansen runs, eventually converting the line to 320 km/h operations.

TBS news report (2011.09.12):



Another PV featuring recent E5 footage:


Source: tobirabito on YouTube
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Old September 21st, 2011, 09:10 AM   #946
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Hitachi develops integrated railway systems simulator for global expansion
http://www.hitachi.com/New/cnews/110920.html

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Tokyo, September 20, 2011 --- Hitachi, Ltd. (NYSE:HIT / TSE:6501) today announced that it has developed an "integrated railway systems simulator", which contributes to developing systems that meet the needs of local railway operators, including the improvement of transportation capability and saving energy costs. In the global market, especially outside of Japan, manufacturers are required to provide proposals covering whole railway systems. To expand its global railway systems business, Hitachi will apply this simulator and thereby strengthen its capability in this area.

In the global railway markets, railway operators require manufacturers to provide proposals considering a broad range of items, such as differences in power-feed equipment used by different countries and lines, variations in types of rolling stock, and services passing through electrified and non-electrified zones. Hitachi's new simulator will be able to evaluate whole railway systems from a comprehensive viewpoint, by simulating large-scale railway systems in consideration of coordination between multiple types of equipment, such as rolling stock, signaling, traffic control, and feeding equipment. It also has the capability to evaluate the effects of changes of conditions, further facilitating the installation of new facilities and equipment in line with technological advances. By applying this simulator, Hitachi will be able to realize optimal equipment location and appropriate energy allocation. Consequently, Hitachi will be able to provide solutions that match global railway infrastructure improvement plans by leveraging the simulation capability.

In recent years, railway systems have been introduced in various countries around the world as an environmentally friendly mode of transportation, and the demand of railway markets is growing strongly in the global arena. As for the international market for railway systems, it is necessary that a manufacturer makes proposals for whole railway systems. In addition, it is necessary to swiftly estimate energy costs in consideration of a variety of complex transportation needs, for example, the differentiation of power-supply systems, AC/DC, and safety standards in different countries as well as operation in electrified and non-electrified zones. In the case of conventional simulators, which simulate stand-alone operations of single-facility models, it is problematic that optimal evaluation of a whole railway system requires a considerable amount of time. With this problem in mind, Hitachi has developed an integrated simulator for railway systems which can evaluate a whole railway system from a comprehensive viewpoint by taking into account interactions between all pieces of equipment and facilities. The key technical features of the developed simulator are summarized as follows.
  1. Integrated estimation and analysis technology for railway systems
    Interactions and coordinated control between multiple railway sub-systems, such as rolling stock, signaling, traffic control, and power-feed equipment, are taken into account. Single pieces of equipment can be focused on according to their purpose. In addition, it is also possible to change parameters and the combination of the sub-systems that form the whole railway systems according to an evaluation target. This technology makes it possible to estimate the running performance of a single unit of rolling stock, the effects of phenomena occurring in one sub-system on other sub-systems, for example, through services on several different lines, and performance of a whole railway system including energy consumption.
  2. Analysis technology for railway systems with multiple energy supply sources
    Energy supply sources for railway systems differ according to countries and lines. Some rolling stock use electricity supplied from sub-stations, while others utilize internal combustion engines such as diesel engines. As for power-feed systems, some lines use direct current or alternating current, and other lines mix the two. To handle such a variety of railway systems, an energy-flow model for each type of rolling stock, a current/voltage supply model which simulates energy supply sources, and a model that simulates operation of each piece of equipment used in rolling stock were developed. By combining these models in a flexible manner, it becomes possible to analyze railway systems with multiple energy supply sources.
When this simulator is applied, by adding an electrical storage device model to a rolling stock equipment model and a power equipment model, it is possible to quantitatively evaluate energy savings owing to installation of electrical-storage devices in rolling-stock equipment or in above-ground equipment. Consequently, it is possible to propose the most appropriate railway systems that utilize electrical-storage devices. In addition, it is possible to estimate energy consumption of combined multiple railway sub-systems such as fluctuation of substation power consumption, which depends on substation capacity and headway, devise measures for improving energy saving and transportation capacity, and propose optimum railway systems that match improvement plans for railway infrastructures in different countries around the world.

From now onwards, this simulator will be applied to globally expanding Hitachi's domestically established technologies in the main systems of rolling stock, signaling, and traffic control, and power feed equipment.
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Old September 21st, 2011, 09:10 AM   #947
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JICA agrees to release loan to Bangladesh Railway for buying locomotives
http://www.thefinancialexpress-bd.co...ate=2011-09-13

Quote:
Japan has finally relaxed its condition of reform and agreed to release a loan for Bangladesh Railway (BR) to purchase 11 locomotives.

The assurance of the loan came when a four-member delegation of Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) led by its Director Tomohide Ichiguchi met Communications Minister Syed Abul Hossain at his office Monday.

Officials said Japan had earlier taken a loan assistance programme for BR in five projects including buying of 11 locomotives at a cost of Tk 3.35 billion in 2007. But the Japanese lending agency suspended the allotment on condition of reform of the railway.

They said the delegation also agreed to release fund for the Laksam- Chinakiastana line double tracking project and $18 million for the Eastern Bridge Project under the Roads and Highways Department (RHD).

During the meeting, the communications minister requested the JICA delegation to consider funding the additional cost of the Tongi Bhairab double tracking project.

He also requested the JICA to conduct feasibility study on the bridges on Dhaka-Chittagong Highway including 2nd Meghna Bridge as China is yet to confirm their interest in the project.

The JICA team arrived in the city Sunday on a five-day visit to strengthen the bilateral relations by settling different issues including fixing of the routes of Mass Rapid Transit line-6.

Communications Secretary Mozammel Haq Khan, Rail Division Secretary Ebadat Ali and Director General of Bangladesh Railway Abu Taher attended the meeting. Mayumi Endoh, senior representative of JICA, was also present.
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Old September 22nd, 2011, 08:29 AM   #948
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E6 series resumes test runs

The prototype E6 series was out and about on test runs once more the late evening of 2011.09.21 and early morning of 2011.09.22. I believe this marks the first testing with the E6 since the earthquake and tsunami in March, although it may just have been extremely elusive during this period. In any event, some photos:
Source: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/mae_room/

25:30 Parked at Platform 12 at Ōmagari Station on the Akita Shinkansen:



25:41 Using the switchback to get onto the Ōu Main Line, bound for Akita



Long exposure



27:10 Return from Akita, arriving on Platform 11



Signed as “Test Run”



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Old September 22nd, 2011, 08:30 AM   #949
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New public passage and elevated concourse open at JR Takaoka Station: Part 1

On 2011.08.28, JR West unveiled the new north-south public passage and elevated station concourse at JR Takaoka Station on the Hokuriku Main Line. This is the latest milestone in the various upgrades to Takaoka Station, which also include construction of a pedestrian deck and extension of the Man’yō Line, a tram line serving Takaoka City, Toyama Prefecture’s second city.

Pictures:
Source: http://saitoshika.blog119.fc2.com/

Compact, but a nice design by JR West, frequently written off for tending to skimp on design a bit. Still entirely functional though, with double escalators, an elevator, and a small truss canopy to provide shelter against inclement weather.



The Zuiryūji Exit (south exit) of the north-south public passage.





The public passage has been named the “Man’yō Road”, and is approx. 100 m long and 12-20 m wide.



Really liking the design, including the ceiling slats, the full-height windows, and “stela”-style directional signage incorporating lacquer techniques.



The signage is color-coded. Blue is for Zuiryūji Exit, red is for the Takaoka Kojō Park Exit (north exit).



This signage unit, decorated with Japanese-style ornamentation, includes an embedded digital signage installation.

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Old September 22nd, 2011, 08:31 AM   #950
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New public passage and elevated concourse open at JR Takaoka Station: Part 2

Station entrance… They obviously put a lot of effort into the arch paneling, composed of specially-colored copper plates etched with images of the fenghuang / hōō (phoenix) and katakago flowers from the Man'yōshū. The ceiling features aluminum elements arranged to be reminiscent of Mt. Tate.



A bit jarring to see the station reborn in modern style but still have manned ticket gates. Departure boards are three-color LEDs, but they are high-resolution units (rare for JR West), so the Minchō font shows up pretty well.



Platform bridge, inside the paid area. Not a fan of this type of signage, which reminds of JR Kyūshū signage, but the stairwells are color coded by platform for visibility.



Moving towards the Takaoka Kojō Park Exit and the old station building…



Its duties finished, the former ticketing entrance is now fenced off.



Station plaza and Takaoka Station tenant building. Really showing its age, including the old “Takaoka Station Department Store” sign, but with the completion of the new station building and relocation of station functions, this building is now shuttered.



Replacement will look like this. Completion is scheduled for spring 2014. Aside from the demolition and replacement of the tenant building, the remaining work includes the pedestrian deck at the north exit and new bike and vehicular parking.



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Old September 24th, 2011, 06:58 PM   #951
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Quote:
Originally Posted by happosai View Post
The EMU's have arrived!! 5 units spotted at Tutuban yard.



























EMU 203 arrival at Tutuban Yard
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Old September 28th, 2011, 09:39 AM   #952
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Kawasaki develops its own locomotive-hauled HSR trains for U.S. market
http://www.nikkei.com/news/category/...08122009000000

Quote:
Targeting the high-speed rail projects currently being planned for the United States, Kawasaki Heavy Industries has developed its own train capable of running at over 200 km/h. In Japan, rolling stock development is spearheaded by railway companies such as JR, but overseas, the typical project requires railcar manufacturers to design their own trains. Kawasaki Heavy Industries hopes to gain an advantage in the competition to win contracts, pivoting off of an internally-developed train that will easily satisfy the United States’ technological requirements.

The new train is being called the “K-Star Express”, and is envisioned for commercial operations of 200 to 250 km/h. In conformance with U.S. federal government standards, the train has been designed with sufficient strength to withstand a 225-ton object colliding with the end cars. The design philosophy is substantially different from that of Japan, which assumes complete collision avoidance as a prerequisite.

So far, Kawasaki has primarily won contracts in the United States for subway trains. Through the development of the K-Star, the company will aim to win contracts for the 200+ km/h railways being planned in Chicago (Illinois) and rolling stock replacement for long-distance trains operated by Amtrak.

Kawasaki Heavy Industries’ revenues in its railway-related businesses for the fiscal year ending March 2011 were approx. ¥130 billion, of which 60% comes from overseas contracts. Focusing on the United States, the company will now expand its contracts overseas, drafting a plan to increase revenues to ¥160 billion in the fiscal year ending March 2013.

In the United States, a six-firm consortium comprised of East Japan Railway Company (JR East), Kawasaki Heavy Industries, Hitachi, and others are aiming to win contracts for the 300+ km/h high-speed railway being planned for California. While the strategy is to market Japan’s Shinkansen technology—from signaling to operations management—unmodified, the hurdles in the way of winning contracts are many, with current Shinkansen trains not strong enough to satisfy the United States’ collision safety standards.

The railways being targeted by Kawasaki Heavy Industries in this latest project, such as Amtrak, are different from Japan’s Shinkansen model, and involve a lead locomotive hauling passenger cars. As the trains will run on classic lines with other trains instead of exclusive tracks like the Shinkansen, JR representatives are lacking in technological expertise and operational knowhow. As there is no need to form a Japanese consortium in order to satisfy the demands of U.S. railway operators, it may make it easier for railcar manufacturers to develop their own rolling stock individually.
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Old September 28th, 2011, 08:26 PM   #953
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any pictures?
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Old September 28th, 2011, 10:18 PM   #954
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After taking a closer look, I realize this isn’t actually a new development… They already had some info about the project for quite some time:
http://www.japantransport.com/seminar/Kawasaki.pdf

Quote:
K-Star Express
  • Kawasaki’s new locomotive hauled single deck coaches that operate either in push pull or pull only mode
    [*」Most suitable as USDOT high speed rail network coaches and Amtrak’s next generation coaches
  • Full conformance to CFR TIER-I and ADA requirements
  • Fully utilize Maryland MARC-III proven technologies for conformance to rules and regulations and high speed running stability in USA



They’re basically incorporating some of the design considerations from the bi-level commuter cars they manufactured for MARC. The marketing strategy is that they now have two models to offer, one an FRA-compliant medium-speed train (K-Star Express) and the other a high-speed train (efSET).

The rendering shows a paint scheme and car body that looks really similar to the Sōtetsu 10000 series (a commuter EMU in the Tōkyō area), while the headlights look similar to the JR East HB-E300 series (a hybrid DMU).
http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%...000_10708F.jpg
http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%...rt-Asunaro.jpg
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Old September 29th, 2011, 06:19 AM   #955
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Taiwan HSR to purchase three additional Shinkansen trainsets
http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/...7KS24K20110928

Quote:
(Reuters) - Taiwan High Speed Rail Corp (THSR) is planning to buy trains from a Japanese consortium in an estimated T$3 billion ($98 million) deal, its chairman said on Wednesday, as the bullet train operator anticipates an increase in passengers.

The company plans to add three sets of trains to the 30 sets of the 700T series it already has due to an expected increase in passengers in the next three years, chairman Ou Chin-teh told Reuters on the sidelines of a business event.

He did not identify what types of trains that THSR plans to purchase. Each set of the 700T series cost about T$1 billion, according to a company official, who asked not to be identified as he was not authorised to talk to the media.

The 700T series are built by a consortium that includes Kawasaki Heavy and Toshiba . Most of the Taiwanese company's track runs on viaducts or through tunnels with technology mainly based on Japan's Shinkansen system mixed with European standards and system components.

THSR swung to a profit of T$1.98 billion in the first half of this year, after posting losses each year since it began services in 2007.
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Old October 10th, 2011, 07:04 AM   #956
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JR East, JR West, Tōkyō Metro agree to form consultancy for overseas projects
http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-b...0111006a4.html

Quote:
East Japan Railway Co. and six other railways plan to set up a company Nov. 1 to provide consulting services for railroad projects overseas.

Japan International Consultants for Transportation Co., to be established in Tokyo and capitalized at ¥480 million, will promote Japanese railway technology and help train-car manufacturers and construction companies take part in such projects.

"High-speed rail has been attracting interest around the world. We hope to convey the advantages offered by Japanese railways" through the consultancy, JR East President Satoshi Seino said at a news conference Tuesday.

Seino indicated that the company, which targets ¥1 billion in sales in the business year through March 2013, aims to win contracts in Southeast Asia and India.

Arrangements are under way for the new company to take over some of the operations and personnel at Japan Railway Technical Service, which has so far provided similar services.
More details on this now… The first news article from a while ago is here.

The official press release from JR East offers the following details regarding the ownership structure:

Quote:
East Japan Railway Company: 54%
West Japan Railway Company: 21%
Tōkyō Metro Co., Ltd.: 21%
Kyūshū Railway Company: 1%
Japan Freight Railway Company: 1%
Tōkyū Corporation: 1%
Keihan Electric Railway Co., Ltd.: 1%
Interesting to see that there is an emphasis on urban rail with the addition of Tōkyō Metro, as well as trackside development and comprehensive urban planning with the (albeit) small contribution of Tōkyū and Keihan, both major private railways.
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Old October 10th, 2011, 07:05 AM   #957
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Kyūshū Shinkansen station plazas: Part 1

A short series of photos of station plazas at the three major stations on the Kyūshū Shinkansen.
First off is Hakata:
Source: http://ameblo.jp/maimai24/

Like the station building (JR Hakata City), the plaza was designed by Mitooka Eiji.













Apparently, Fukuoka City was reluctant to allow the placement of trees in the plaza, as they didn’t want bear the cost of cleaning up the leaves. The president of JR Kyūshū then offered that the railway do all the sweeping, and the trees were approved.
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Old October 10th, 2011, 07:06 AM   #958
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Dbl post
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Old October 10th, 2011, 07:07 AM   #959
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Kyūshū Shinkansen station plazas: Part 2

Next, Kumamoto Station, which is the gateway to what will eventually be Japan’s 20th city designated by government ordinance next year:
Source: http://ameblo.jp/maimai24/

The major plaza is outside the Shinkansen Exit (West Exit) of the station.



Definitely one of the more unique stations on the line, as you can see trains stopped at the station through the large glass section in the center.





The plaza is part of the Kumamoto Artopolis project, and was designed by Satō Mitsuhiko. The concept is supposed to be a half-outdoor “park” space.



A wall and canopy surround the rotary, painted black on the interior and white on the exterior. It’s supposed to be reminiscent of the walls of Kumamoto Castle.



There are sections cut through the wall, such as this stop for charter buses.



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Old October 10th, 2011, 07:08 AM   #960
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Kyūshū Shinkansen station plazas: Part 3

Small water feature (Kumamoto is known for its water)



Twist the knob for mineral water



The plaza has a different feel during the evenings, but still very nice!





Lastly, is this oddity… The gate to a small home lies just outside of the plaza center.
Not sure who designed the gate, but it matches very well with the rest of the plaza.



This must be the closest home to a Shinkansen station anywhere in Japan.



Last is Kagoshima Chūō, which lacks the appeal of the plazas at Hakata and Kumamoto, but is still functional.
Source: http://ameblo.jp/maimai24/

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