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Old July 28th, 2007, 03:29 AM   #121
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I believed it was renovated to be like a home to increase patronage.
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Old July 30th, 2007, 11:57 AM   #122
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Very good idea!!! And cat is absolutely cute!
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Old July 31st, 2007, 07:57 AM   #123
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Japan to introduce the world's first hybrid train

Japan to introduce the world's first hybrid train
Published: July 28, 2007




The hybrid train Kiha E200, developed by East Japan Railway, picking up
speed during a test run near Saku in northern Japan on Friday.
(Katsumi Kasahara/The Associated Press)



SAKU, Japan: Winding through rice paddies and lazily blowing its whistle along bubbly creeks, a two-car train in rural northern Japan is the latest entrant in the battle against global warming.

Following its runaway success with hybrid cars, Japan is bringing the world hybrid trains. Regular passenger runs are set to begin Tuesday on a short mountain route, the first time a diesel-electric hybrid train will be put into commercial service.

"It's part of our efforts to be green," Yasuaki Kikuchi, a spokesman for East Japan Railway Co., said Friday during an exclusive trial run for The Associated Press.

Compared to cars, trains are a relatively small contributor to global warming. In the United States, railways contribute just 4 percent of transportation-related emissions of carbon dioxide, the main greenhouse gas blamed for global warming.

But the popularity of hybrid cars, such as Toyota Motor Corp.'s best-selling Prius, is helping to boost interest in hybrid trains. Railway companies around the world, including America's Amtrak and Germany's Deutsche Bahn AG, are working on or investigating the technology.

Cost remains a hurdle. The Japanese train, which boosts fuel efficiency by 20 percent and reduces emissions by up to 60 percent, runs nearly 200 million yen (US$1.7 million; €1.2 million), twice as much as a standard train, Kikuchi said.

The Kiha E200, as it is known, is equipped with a diesel engine, two electric motors under each of its cars and lithium ion batteries on the roof.

With the word "hybrid" splashed in silver across its side, the otherwise normal-looking train rolls quietly out of Nakagomi station, powered by its four electric motors.

The diesel engine only kicks in with a rumble when needed to climb a hill or if the batteries run low.

The batteries are recharged when the train slows down. After the power is switched off, the motors continue to turn for a while, and that energy — wasted in a non-hybrid train — is used to recharge the batteries.

Besides the usual buttons and dials, the conductor also has a touch-panel monitor. Arrows show which way energy is flowing, connecting boxes that represent the engine, generator, motor and battery, busily changing direction every few minutes. Whether cars or trains, hybrids delicately balance the two sources of power, relying on a computer to minimize waste.

The Kiha E200, which seats 46 and can hold 117 people including standees, is debuting on a line that runs about once an hour on a 79 kilometer (49 mile) route through a mountain resort area.

East Japan Railway will gather data on fuel consumption, which is expected to vary with different passenger loads; maintenance needs and whether the power holds up for heating in winter, said company engineer Mitsuyoshi Yokota.

In North America, Railpower Technologies Corp. has developed a hybrid train called the Green Goat for moving freight cars in a rail yard.

But industry efforts are focused on developing cleaner fuels for non-hybrid trains, said Allen Schaeffer, executive director of the Diesel Technology Forum, a trade association representing engine and equipment manufacturers.

"Here in the U.S., we're not really looking at hybrid technology as replacing the main locomotive," he said.

Hybrid trains, long viewed as impracticable because it's cumbersome to get the various parts to work together, are catching on thanks to hybrid cars, said Makoto Arisawa, an ecology professor and train expert at Keio University in Tokyo.

"Maybe we can't expect too much from a railway this small," he said. "For the technology to be effective, it must become more widespread."

That didn't stop Hitomi Shimizu, 29, who runs a nearby inn, from showing up at Nakagomi station to get a snapshot of herself on the platform with the train.

"I'm so proud of being part of a community with a train that's gentle to the environment," she said.

Copyright © 2007 the International Herald Tribune All rights reserved
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Old July 31st, 2007, 12:20 PM   #124
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nazrey View Post
The batteries are recharged when the train slows down. After the power is switched off, the motors continue to turn for a while, and that energy — wasted in a non-hybrid train — is used to recharge the batteries.
Regenerative braking has been around for decades.

Over here, braking trains and trams generate power which is fed back into the overhead.

I guess the actual advancement is being able to develop batteries (and control systems) that can store sufficient energy to power a train over a reasonable distance.
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Old July 31st, 2007, 02:42 PM   #125
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Quote:
Originally Posted by invincible View Post
Regenerative braking has been around for decades.

Over here, braking trains and trams generate power which is fed back into the overhead.

I guess the actual advancement is being able to develop batteries (and control systems) that can store sufficient energy to power a train over a reasonable distance.
Partly. But this train functions with electricity without overhead cables. So this can replace diesel locomotives on non-electrified tracks,which is a new thing.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 07:18 PM   #126
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Diesel electric locomotives are a long established category.

I dont know if those in use do use breaking energy though. Perhaps this is why its called "hybrid" in the article.

Perhaps someone who knows more about it can write if thats really a new application at diesel-electric trains or not.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 07:29 PM   #127
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Quote:
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Diesel electric locomotives are a long established category.

I dont know if those in use do use breaking energy though. Perhaps this is why its called "hybrid" in the article.

Perhaps someone who knows more about it can write if thats really a new application at diesel-electric trains or not.
I believe the diesel-electric produces electricity from the fuel. This only uses fuel when needed. Otherwise runs on stored electricity.
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Old August 1st, 2007, 07:35 PM   #128
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slartibartfas View Post
Diesel electric locomotives are a long established category.

I dont know if those in use do use breaking energy though. Perhaps this is why its called "hybrid" in the article.

Perhaps someone who knows more about it can write if thats really a new application at diesel-electric trains or not.
diesel electric locomotives are ones that have the capacity to use diesel and electric power. In order to use the electric type, it needs overhead wires.

this is not the case in this thread. it is able to run on electricity that it generates itself. hence why this is news worthy.
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Old August 2nd, 2007, 05:28 PM   #129
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No, there is a bit of ambiguity in the terms. Most diesel locomotives are diesel-electric locomotives, where the locomotive contains a large diesel generator which supplies electricity to the motors. Many also have connections to supply electricity to passenger carriages.

The other common type of transmission used (according to Wikipedia) is diesel-hydraulic.
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Old August 11th, 2007, 02:26 PM   #130
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can someone translate this discussion into English please?
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Old August 11th, 2007, 10:46 PM   #131
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DRUMM BATTERY TRAINS

Not a Hybrid as such but Professor Drumm (Trinity College, Dublin) developed battery powered Railcars for irish Railways as long ago as the 1930's it was run mainly from Dublin to Bray, a relatively short distance about 20 km. They ran for about 20 years. They were however rather expensive to to run compared to the then coal Locomotives and when the time came to replace the batteries it was decided not to continue using them.
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Last edited by freeluas; August 11th, 2007 at 11:38 PM. Reason: Found photo
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Old August 14th, 2007, 01:35 PM   #132
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FEVE is the narrow gauge public operator in Spain. Years ago they bought and developed a hybird loco for carry passangers and goods in the North of the country.

See more pics here:

http://www.railfaneurope.net/pix/es/.../1900/pix.html

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Old August 14th, 2007, 01:43 PM   #133
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Can you see hollows for hide the pantographs over the loco's ceiling??

Running on diesel in this pic

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Old August 14th, 2007, 01:49 PM   #134
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I don't know if I could name a diesel train that wasn't diesel-electric. i.e. diesel genrator powering electric motors. Why would a train building company design a mechanical drive system?
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Old August 14th, 2007, 01:54 PM   #135
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Your are right, diesel-electric would be right term.

I suppose FEVE developed these locos to take advantage of its network. Electrified lines of FEVE are only around the big cities. Rest of lines, rural and coastal ones, are exclusively non-electrified.
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Old August 14th, 2007, 09:45 PM   #136
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Quote:
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I don't know if I could name a diesel train that wasn't diesel-electric. i.e. diesel genrator powering electric motors. Why would a train building company design a mechanical drive system?
The Austrian railways have a rather new train that is diesel hydraulic. Its used for switching purposes.



I heard that those hydraulic trains have a superior efficiency in comparision to diesel-electric ones. The downside is higher maintenance costs.


After reading a bit about it, I see that diesel-electric trains normally dont inlucde break energy recoverage.

So the news is indeed worth to be mentioned. I can not verify though, in how far the claim that this mentioned train is the first that is able to drive on recovered brake energy.
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Old August 15th, 2007, 01:08 AM   #137
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I saw this train in Mito station.
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Old August 16th, 2007, 05:18 PM   #138
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Quote:
Originally Posted by elfabyanos View Post
I don't know if I could name a diesel train that wasn't diesel-electric. i.e. diesel genrator powering electric motors. Why would a train building company design a mechanical drive system?
Victoria's VLocity 160 trains use a diesel-hydraulic transmission provided by Voith.


Image from Wikipedia, taken by wongm.

I can't find any information on the previous model of DMU railcar, because it's called the Sprinter which happens to also be name of a type of DMU in the UK. Older locomotive hauled trains are all diesel-electric though.
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Old August 17th, 2007, 02:30 PM   #139
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Slartibartfas View Post

After reading a bit about it, I see that diesel-electric trains normally dont inlucde break energy recoverage.

So the news is indeed worth to be mentioned. I can not verify though, in how far the claim that this mentioned train is the first that is able to drive on recovered brake energy.
UK Voyager trains are diesel-elctric and utilise rheostatic braking.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgin_Voyager

Whilst the Japanese train is no doubt a good product, there doesn't seem to be anything ground-breaking about it. Rheostatic braking has been around for decades, nearly all new electric trains in the uk have it, and many diesel-electrics.
The difference being that it is designed to run without the diesel powerplant for periods of time. The fact remains that all the pwer must come from the diesel power plant or rheostatic braking - same as a lot of other trains. Ultimate benefit to the environment is zero.
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Old August 20th, 2007, 12:39 PM   #140
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The difference is the Japanese train uses regenerative braking which stores the braking energy in batteries for reuse.

Rheostatic braking dissapates the energy as heat in resistors (a rheostat is a variable resistor). Also known as dynamic braking.

For a comparison of regenerative and rheostatic braking this Wikipedia article might be helpful.

I think the train reduces emissions by running the diesel engine at constant speed to charge the batteries and switching off when not required. Diesel engines produce a lot of soot when changing speed (speeding up or slowing down).

Similar techonogy is being tested in the UK with an HST power car converted to hybrid power as a test bed. It's used on Network Rail's track measurement train.

Hope this helps.
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