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Old April 3rd, 2014, 01:54 AM   #1641
00Zy99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smithrh View Post
In http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OOzQ8jTcSg8, the train operator uses a very distinctive red flip phone with a clear JR logo on it. This device also has a circle of white LEDs which is also very unique.

8:31 in the video gives a fairly clear shot of the device.

This device is used after the emergency brakes are applied.

I hesitate to call this device a cell phone as it's possible that it's a two-way radio, but that's not entirely likely for various reasons.

I am guessing that the color, prominent JR logo and white LEDs are to distinguish this device from any personal cellular device.

Anyone have information on JR's radio network? I do find it a bit odd that they wouldn't use 2-way radio in this case...

What line and train type is that?
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Old April 3rd, 2014, 03:20 AM   #1642
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Quote:
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What line and train type is that?
Not sure - I don't read Japanese and the translation from Google Translate doesn't mention any specifics...
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Old April 3rd, 2014, 06:30 AM   #1643
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Quote:
What line and train type is that?
Kiha 85 on a Wide View Hida service on the JR Tokai Takayama Line. On some JR trains (I recall seeing them on JR West), there are notice stickers applied to the windows dividing the passenger area and driver's compartment stating that in cases of emergency, drivers may use cell phones to report operating conditions to a control center.
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Old April 3rd, 2014, 11:59 AM   #1644
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I bet something similar happens at the front of the train when I was in Japan in 2007, when a part of the group I was with pushed on the wrong button on the lavatory
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Old April 11th, 2014, 06:06 AM   #1645
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Kotatsu train




all Sanriku line revived in April 2014

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Old April 16th, 2014, 01:43 PM   #1646
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When I was in Japan I noticed that all commuter type trains I travelled on had lots of wind noise and rattling panels and doors. The same effect can be seen/heard in many Youtube clips, especially when trains pass each other. I can imagine that those rattling doors could also create a severe cold draft in winter.

Given that Japan is relatively crowded, it would make sense that they would appreciate all comfort possible when possible and except for rattling panels I never noticed anything this bad on European trains/trams/subways. So why do they accept being put up with this in Japan?
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Old April 16th, 2014, 02:46 PM   #1647
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M-NL View Post
When I was in Japan I noticed that all commuter type trains I travelled on had lots of wind noise and rattling panels and doors. The same effect can be seen/heard in many Youtube clips, especially when trains pass each other. I can imagine that those rattling doors could also create a severe cold draft in winter.
Where were you in Japan when you experienced this? I've rode the E231's and E233's in the Tokyo area and never had this problem.
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Old April 16th, 2014, 04:59 PM   #1648
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Rattling is common on older stock with sliding doors. Plug doors are not common on commuter stock as they are less reliable and maintenance intensive. In my 16+ years living in Japan, I have never found it particularly cold on trains in winter. Quite the opposite in many cases.
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Old April 16th, 2014, 07:28 PM   #1649
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Actually on the E231 or E233 series, which are quite new rolling stocks of the Takasaki Line I use to go to Tokyo (I live in Gunma), I seldom notice doors rattling.
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Old April 17th, 2014, 09:05 AM   #1650
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That's also what I noticed. New rolling stock still seems to have the whistling at speed but the rattling is mostly gone. Even older stock with sliding doors doesn't need to rattle: Dutch mat '54 also has sliding doors and that didn't have severe rattles at the end of their 40 year service life either.

I rode several trains in Japan: Some old stock on Nishitetsu's Omuta Line, the JR West 115 on the Sanyo Line, several subways in Kyoto and Tokyo, as well as several commuter lines in Tokyo.

If plug doors are less reliable: why are the fast majority of European trains fitted with them?
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Old April 17th, 2014, 01:59 PM   #1651
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M-NL View Post
That's also what I noticed. New rolling stock still seems to have the whistling at speed but the rattling is mostly gone. Even older stock with sliding doors doesn't need to rattle: Dutch mat '54 also has sliding doors and that didn't have severe rattles at the end of their 40 year service life either.

I rode several trains in Japan: Some old stock on Nishitetsu's Omuta Line, the JR West 115 on the Sanyo Line, several subways in Kyoto and Tokyo, as well as several commuter lines in Tokyo.

If plug doors are less reliable: why are the fast majority of European trains fitted with them?
Plug doors are most definitely a problem when it comes to reliability. They're great for aesthetics as well as for being better for keeping the climate out (at least I notice that most of all here in Sweden). That said, the plug doors on the Stockholm tunnelbana I find often have problems with the "sucking" sound, where they briefly get sucked out part way and slam closed again. This noise is far more disturbing than the slight rattle one might note with sliding doors. The older rolling stock on the tunnelbana have sliding doors, and I actually prefer them to the plug doors on the new C20 rolling stock. Not only do they open faster, but they don't do the "sucky thing" if one can call it that.

I would pay very good money to get rolling stock of the quality that is used in Japan overall - especially the newest JR East urban stock on the Chuo, Keihin-Tohoku, Saikyo and Yamanote lines.
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Old April 17th, 2014, 02:25 PM   #1652
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I suppose it depends on the vehicle type; the plug doors in use in the UK on the class 225s and Desiro stock that I've experienced have always held still and solid. On the contrary, the sliding doors used on the old Thameslink trains (319s?) rattle and bang a lot when passing other trains
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Old April 17th, 2014, 03:33 PM   #1653
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sopomon View Post

I suppose it depends on the vehicle type; the plug doors in use in the UK on the class 225s and Desiro stock that I've experienced have always held still and solid. On the contrary, the sliding doors used on the old Thameslink trains (319s?) rattle and bang a lot when passing other trains
It's funny that the Desiro stock don't have that problem, yet our Bombardier made C20 stock does. If you pass a train underground, the doors suck outwards very noticeably, and even if the air pressure changes in the tunnel at all, the doors all get sucked outwards. I'm not sure why this occurs, but it certainly does.

Anyway, the key issue on an urban railway that I see is that plug doors are just so SLOW to open compared to sliding doors. Again, to use the Stockholm example as a metro system that has both door systems, the older rolling stock have far quicker doors on the older sliding door rolling stock, whereas the new stock have irritatingly slow plug doors. That extra dwell time makes all the difference on a metro system. I, personally, don't like plug doors at all.
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Old April 17th, 2014, 03:40 PM   #1654
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From Global Rail News:

Quote:
http://www.globalrailnews.com/2014/0...longest-rails/

Japanese company begins manufacturing ‘world’s longest rails’
17 APR, 2014

A Japanese steel works has completed an upgrade of its facilities which will allow it to manufacture and ship 150-metre length rails.

Described by Nippon Steel & Sumitomo Metal Corporation (NSSMC) as the longest in the world, the rails have been developed to deal with the evolution in passenger and freight traffic loads and speeds.

The company has just completed an upgrade of its Yawata Works, which has been manufacturing rails since it opened in 1901, to accommodate the longer rails.

Until now, NSSMC has produced standard 25-metre lengths up to a maximum of 50 metres. The new rails will require less welding and fewer joints, which reduces the possibility of failures and the ride quality for passengers
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Old April 19th, 2014, 10:41 AM   #1655
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And that rail track:

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Old April 19th, 2014, 03:11 PM   #1656
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My guess is that among the first customers for these longer rail sections is JR East and JR Hokkaido to build the 1435 mm tracks between Shin-Aomori and Shin-Hakodate Stations through the Seikan Tunnel for the Hokkaido Shinkansen line.

Speaking of which I've read that the Shinkansen trains on the Hokkaido Shinkansen line may be initially limited to 140 km/h (87 mph) between Oku-Tsugaru (neé Tsugaru-Imabetsu) and Kikonai Stations through the Seikan Tunnel to maintain speed compatibility with JR Freight trains that also use the tunnel.
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Old April 19th, 2014, 11:32 PM   #1657
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Would anybody happen to have a grade profile for Usui Pass? Or better yet, the Shinetsu Main Line as a whole?
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Old April 20th, 2014, 03:06 AM   #1658
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sacto7654 View Post
My guess is that among the first customers for these longer rail sections is JR East and JR Hokkaido to build the 1435 mm tracks between Shin-Aomori and Shin-Hakodate Stations through the Seikan Tunnel for the Hokkaido Shinkansen line.

Speaking of which I've read that the Shinkansen trains on the Hokkaido Shinkansen line may be initially limited to 140 km/h (87 mph) between Oku-Tsugaru (neé Tsugaru-Imabetsu) and Kikonai Stations through the Seikan Tunnel to maintain speed compatibility with JR Freight trains that also use the tunnel.
On a similar note, is the Hokkaido Shinkansen limited to 260km/h by curvature or simply for maintenance cost savings? Given the Tohoku Shinkansen aims to run at 360 eventually, having the Hokkaido Shinkansen running only at 260 could be what prevents Tokyo-Sapporo travel times from being competitive.
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Old April 20th, 2014, 03:15 AM   #1659
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Quote:
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Would anybody happen to have a grade profile for Usui Pass? Or better yet, the Shinetsu Main Line as a whole?
Usui Pass has a grade of 6,7% between Yokokawa and Karuizawa. The line has no traffic since 1997, when Nagano Shinkansen began Its operations.

In the other hand, I believe Usui Pass would be reactivated for freight trains, only. Nagano region has a poor connection with Tokyo and Yokohama harbour by railways and Japan need to reduce Its fuel consumption because a great part of import oil is used to move trucks on Japanese expressways.

So, the reactivation of Usui Pass (with new electric locomotives) would increase the increase traffic of freight trains in Nagano, Niigata and Kanazawa regions, contributing to the environment and reducing consumption of imported oil.
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Old April 20th, 2014, 08:21 PM   #1660
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Although the São Paulo-Santos railway has a 110‰ incline equipped with rack, basically no freight mainline in the world exceed 40‰, and even grades higher around 25‰ are seen as high (European target for new lines is even as low as 12‰). How could a 67‰ line carry economically a lot of freight?
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