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Old December 14th, 2008, 05:08 PM   #161
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Svartmetall View Post
That is a pretty impressive railway! Is it easy to get to from Tokyo (as it looks pretty close)?
It took one hour approximately from Shinjuku.



from http://www.odakyu.jp/english/freepass/enokama_01.html
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Old December 16th, 2008, 08:13 PM   #162
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That's beautiful. I simply don't have any words to describe it.
To what major city is this town close to?
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Old December 16th, 2008, 11:40 PM   #163
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Kamakura is just south of Yokohama and is part of Greater Tokyo. It's very easy to get to by train (Odakyu or JR) and is a popular day trip destination when in the Tokyo area.
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Old May 18th, 2009, 05:17 PM   #164
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Today I visited Kamakura and Enoshima, I also took some pictures of these little trains.

























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Old May 18th, 2009, 06:18 PM   #165
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Japanese are the first in city space economy! Great lines!
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Old May 19th, 2009, 01:50 AM   #166
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waa, natsukashii! I used to see Enoden all the time in Slam Dunk openings and endings when I was younger. I think when I finally went to Shonan area, I took Enoden and went around looking for all the high schools they used in SD
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Old May 19th, 2009, 03:44 AM   #167
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RyukyuRhymer View Post
waa, natsukashii! I used to see Enoden all the time in Slam Dunk openings and endings when I was younger. I think when I finally went to Shonan area, I took Enoden and went around looking for all the high schools they used in SD
Yes, speaking of nostalgia, this line has special meaning for me, as my grandparents used to live in Kamakura. When I was a tot, my grandmother would take me on a ride to Fujisawa. The cavernous (to my four year old eyes) interior of the bay terminal there left a big impression, as well as the street running near Enoshima. Nothing much has changed, though I dislike the faux antique streetcar looks of the newer trainsets. The "rickety" and "cramped" units are the best!
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Old June 21st, 2009, 03:45 PM   #168
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EnoDen

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Old June 22nd, 2009, 02:05 AM   #169
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k.k.jetcar View Post
Yes, speaking of nostalgia, this line has special meaning for me, as my grandparents used to live in Kamakura. When I was a tot, my grandmother would take me on a ride to Fujisawa.
If you haven't already seen it, you should watch Akira Kurosawa's film Tengoku to jigoku (High and Low), made in 1963. The Enoden plays a rather important role in the plot and you'll get to see real vintage streetcars.
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Old November 6th, 2010, 12:21 PM   #170
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JAPAN | Railways

Instead of clogging up other posters' threads, I decided to make my own.

Post anything related to general Japanese rail service outside of urban transport, including the following:
  • High-speed rail (Shinkansen, maglev, free-gauge train)
  • Local (rural) rail lines
  • Conventional intercity rail (limited expresses)
  • Sleeper trains, steam, and other special passenger rail
  • Freight (conventional, high-speed)
    etc.
This will (hopefully) be the counterpart to my thread on Japanese urban transport in the Subways and Urban Transport forum... Mostly news and informational posts, with some railfan stuff interjected here and there.

I will probably start light so as not to kill myself handling both this and the urban transport thread, and hopefully pick up the pace as I get my schedule worked out. Feel free to post anything you find, though... Any help is appreciated.

宜しくお願いします。m(_ _)m
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Old November 6th, 2010, 12:23 PM   #171
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Q&A on the Chūō Shinkansen maglev
http://chubu.yomiuri.co.jp/news_k/ckei101027_1.htm

Quote:
In preparation for the Chūō Shinkansen maglev project, JR Central will begin trial runs starting in late FY2013 on the Yamanashi test track (total length: 42.8 km), using superconducting maglev trains designed for revenue service. To find out just what this maglev line, slated to open between Tōkyō (Shinagawa) and Nagoya in 2027, is all about, we looked at things from a passenger's perspective and summarized the details in a question-and-answer format.

No operator on board
Q: Will operators be on board the maglev trains?
A: All operation will be handled by the command center, so operators will not be on board any of the trains. For passenger information and guidance during emergencies, however, conductors will be on board.

No seatbelts
Q: Maximum speed during revenue service is approx. 500 km. Will the seats have seatbelts?
A: JR Central's plan is to "aim for a comfortable ride" (Executive Director Shirakuni Noriyuki) and avoid rapid acceleration or deceleration in regular operations, so there won't be seatbelts. In order to allow passengers to enjoy a leisurely ride, the overhead space and luggage storage space will be increased compared to the current test train.

More expensive than the Nozomi
Q: What will the fares for the maglev be?
A: According to preliminary calculations by JR Central, the fare between Tōkyō and Ōsaka is expected to be ¥15,050—¥1,000 more than the current ¥14,050 for reserved seats on Tōkaidō Shinkansen Nozomi trains—while the fare between Tōkyō and Nagoya is expected to be ¥11,480—¥700 more than the current ¥10,780 for reserved seats on Nozomi trains. However, due to the need to factor in economic conditions and price levels at the time of the opening of the new line, the final fare structure will be decided only when the opening date nears.

Primarily non-stop
Q: What stations will the maglev stop at?
A: According to current calculations, at the time of the opening to Nagoya, JR Central is assuming operation of a maximum of five trains in each direction, and 144 trains total daily. Of the five trains, four will be Nozomi-type services running non-stop between Tōkyō and Nagoya. The fifth train is envisioned as a Kodama-type service that stops at every intermediate station, one for each prefecture.

15 minutes to transfer
Q: When the maglev opens all the way to Nagoya Station, how will passengers transfer to the Tōkaidō Shinkansen?
A: The maglev's Nagoya Station is expected to be constructed as a deep underground structure more than 40 m below the ground surface, and passengers will use elevators and other means to access street level. From a convenience standpoint, JR Central envisions locating the station within a 15-minute transfer with the Shinkansen.

More stations on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen
Q: What will service be like on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen after the maglev opens?
A: With the opening of the maglev, JR Central forecasts that people using Nozomi trains for Tōkyō ‒ Ōsaka and Tōkyō ‒ Nagoya trips will switch to the maglev. As a result, JR Central plans to reduce the number of Nozomi services on the Tōkaidō Shinkansen and increase the number of Hikari and Kodama services, increasing convenience for users along the existing line in Kanagawa Prefecture, Shizuoka Prefecture, and eastern Aichi Prefecture. JR Central has also explained that "there would be more possibilities to establish new stations," and some local governments have already requested for new stations to be built.
Another news report, from ANN (2010.10.26), on the recent announcement concerning the maglev trains:

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Old November 6th, 2010, 12:23 PM   #172
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Early press debut of Tōhoku Shinkansen extension held October 29
http://www.yomiuri.co.jp/e-japan/iwa...OYT8T00084.htm

Quote:
60 percent of new extension is tunnels
Prior to the December 4 opening of the Shin-Aomori extension of the Tōhoku Shinkansen, a special press pre-opening test ride was held on October 29, with a train making a round-trip on the new track between Hachinohe and Shin-Aomori Stations.

After departing Morioka Station, where preparations are continuing for the 120th anniversary celebration of the station's opening on November 1, at Hachinohe Station I transferred to the special train for the pre-opening test ride, which doubled as an operator training run. At Hachinohe Station, a panel advertising "36 days until the opening of the full length of the line" was on display.

After departure, fresh concrete walls, silver-colored pipes, and vegetation along the adjacent slopes entered my field of vision. Before long, we entered a tunnel, passing the 600 km mark from Tōkyō Station. As we repeatedly exited and reentered one tunnel after another, we quickly began decelerating, stopping at Shichinohe - Towada Station 12 minutes after our departure from Hachinohe Station. Like Mizusawa - Esashi Station, Shichinohe - Towada Station is a Shinkansen-only station, and work is still continuing on improvements outside the station.

Three minutes later, we began moving again. The anti-snow infrastructure along the sides of the track changed from a side accumulation design to a water sprinkler design like that found at Kitakami Station. In about three minutes, we dive into the Hakkōda Tunnel, traveling its full 26.455 km length in about six minutes. This is the longest terrestrial tunnel in Japan, surpassing the Iwata - Ichinohe Tunnel, and third longest in the world. Tunnels actually comprise approx. 50 km (62%) of the 81.8-km extension, with the remainder comprised of viaducts (approx. 15 km, 18%), cut and fill (approx. 12 km, 15%), and bridges (approx. 4 km, 5%).

After the exiting the 19th and final tunnel, the urbanized districts of Aomori City come into view on the right side, while straight ahead is the Aomori Bay Bridge and directly behind us are the Hakkōda Mountains. Traversing a uniquely-shaped bridge looking like the strings of a harp, we slowly glide past the Sannai Maruyama archeological site before arriving at Shin-Aomori Station in a journey that took a total of 30 minutes. In regular service, the trip will take as little as 24 minutes. The columns and benches on the platforms are made of Aomori-produced hiba cypress and feature Tsugaru-nuri lacquerwork, creating a relaxed feeling. Outside the station, where work still continues, stands a 30-year-old Aomori hiba tree. The JR Morioka Branch Office's Funakoshi Katsumi (58), the Aomori Branch Store Chief, remarked, "We've finally made it this far. I hope many visitors will get to experience Aomori's natural beauty and culture."

The pre-opening test ride Tōhoku Shinkansen train enters the platform at Shin-Aomori Station. The doors are an apple-red color, while the benches feature Aomori-produced hiba cypress wood. (October 29, Shin-Aomori Station)
Window view from a test ride. Starts at Shin-Aomori and then ends at Hachinohe. I believe this was from the November 3 test ride for children with disabilities and their families. Not the best quality, but there are still additional pre-opening test rides on November 20 and 21 for the 5,000 people who were lucky and got selected, so maybe we will get some better quality footage then.


Source: ARAIKIO on YouTube
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Old November 6th, 2010, 12:24 PM   #173
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JAL cuts airfares to Haneda to compete against Tōhoku Shinkansen extension
http://mytown.asahi.com/areanews/aom...011050562.html

Quote:
On October 29, Japan Airlines (JAL) announced discounted airfares for January through March of next year. The Aomori ‒ Haneda flight usually costs ¥30,200 (including the ¥100 Haneda Airport landing fee), but with the "Super Sentoku" program where passengers reserve tickets 45 days before their flight, the airfare for flights between January 11 and February 28 will be reduced to a mere ¥12,000. This is the lowest airfare in the history of the service, and cheaper than the ¥16,370 fare (regular fare plus limited express fare for a non-peak reserved seat) for the Tōhoku Shinkansen between Shin-Aomori and Tōkyō.

According to JAL's Aomori Office, the airline introduced its first "Super Sentoku" program, which offers substantial discounts on Aomori ‒ Haneda and Misawa ‒ Haneda flights. Spokespersons for JAL's Aomori Office say, "The reduced airfare isn't necessarily a direct jab at the Shinkansen, but we certainly kept the Shinkansen fare in mind when we set the new fare."

The cheapest airfares for January through March (excepting peak holiday periods) are as follows:
  • Aomori ‒ Haneda: ¥12,000 to ¥20,000
  • Misawa ‒ Haneda: ¥12,000 to ¥16,500 (normally ¥29,600)
  • Aomori ‒ Itami: ¥18,000 to ¥26,000 (normally ¥36,700)
  • Aomori ‒ Sapporo: ¥16,500 to ¥18,500 (normally ¥21,400)
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Old November 6th, 2010, 12:27 PM   #174
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Tickets for opening day Tōhoku Shinkansen trains sell out in less than a minute
http://mytown.asahi.com/aomori/news....00541011050001
http://mytown.asahi.com/tokyo/news.p...00701011050001

Quote:
First train sells out in 30 seconds
On November 4, just one month away from the opening of the full length of the Tōhoku Shinkansen, tickets for opening day December 4 were on sale, and railfans lined up at several ticket counters in Aomori Prefecture. The first inbound and outbound trains connecting Shin-Aomori (Aomori City) and Tōkyō were so popular that they sold out in less than a minute. Commemorative events were also held inside Aomori City to get the festive mood started.

The new Shin-Aomori Station set to open is still under construction and currently lacks ticket counters, but about 25 people had queued up at Aomori Station about four kilometers away before 10:00 am, when ticket sales were scheduled to start.

Office worker Sakamoto Kōsuke (24), a native of Goshogawara City who now works in Taitō Ward, Tōkyō, was in line since 7:00 am, purchasing a reserved seat on the first train departing Shin-Aomori. Sakamoto went out of his way, taking time off from work to line up at Aomori Station: "If I was going to buy tickets, I figured I might as well buy them back home."

At exactly 10:00 am, after one of the employees at the Midori no Madoguchi ticket counter notified him that the order went through, Sakamoto was all smiles. Sakamoto says he also rode the first train departing Hachinohe Station when the line was extended to Hachinohe in December 2002, and was giddy with excitement: "I'm really glad I was able to get on the first train for both extensions."

Aomori City college student Ōmiya Hiroaki (19), who was second in line and also succeeded in getting a seat on the first train, remarked, "I'm curious to see just how faster it will be between Aomori and Hachinohe now."

At Hachinohe City's Same Station on the JR Hachinohe Line, one man (66) who runs his own company arrived just after 10:00 am to purchase a reserved-seat limited express ticket to get a ride on one of the Shinkansen trains on opening day. He reserved a seat to Hachinohe on a Hayate train departing Shin-Aomori at 12:28 pm, and was looking forward to a 30-minute long trip on the new extension: "I knew the first train was going to be impossible, so I was hoping to ride whatever I could get. Honestly, I wanted to ride all the way to Tōkyō, but with my back pains..."

According to JR East, the first inbound train (for Tōkyō) on opening day sold out in about 30 seconds, while the first outbound train (to Shin-Aomori) sold out in about 45 seconds.

Meanwhile, a special countdown commemorative event was held on November 4 at the station plaza outside Shin-Aomori Station, marking the last 30 days until the opening of the extension.

Approximately 1,000 people from local elementary and high schools and neighborhood associations participated. In the unveiling of the countdown board, Aomori City mayor Shikanai Hiroshi and local pre-school children pulled at the rope, revealing the words, "30 days to opening." Mayor Shikanai remarked, "The station is complete, and I can definitely feel opening day approaching."

Open-air stalls lined the event area, and a special stew featuring the local Aomori breed of free-range chicken, Shamo Rock, was provided for free, enough to feed 1,000 people. Kimura Saeko (15), a first-year student at Aomori West High School, commented, "I want to take the Shinkansen all the way to Ōsaka to visit the hometown of my favorite idol group. The less time I spend in the train, the more time I'll have to spend in Ōsaka."

==============

The countdown board advertising "30 days to opening" is unveiled outside JR Shin-Aomori Station.


People looking to purchase opening-day train tickets line up before the start of ticket sales outside the Midori no Madoguchi ticket counter at JR Aomori Station.


Sakamoto Kōsuke shows off his ticket for the first train. (Aomori Station)
NHK news report (2010.11.04):


Source: senna5706 on YouTube
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Old November 6th, 2010, 12:27 PM   #175
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E5 series videos

Just to get us "up to speed"... Only a month till opening.
Services using the E5 series trains will be known as Hayabusa ("Falcon").

First some scenes testing at Shin-Aomori Station:
Source: Aomori Prefectural Government

Arriving:





Departing:



Testing at 180 kph:



Testing at 300-320 kph:

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Old November 6th, 2010, 01:12 PM   #176
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With Ōsaka Station under going massive renovation, will the same follow with Shin-Ōsaka Station? or will most likely any renovation that happens to it will come along with the Chuo Shinkansen?
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Old November 7th, 2010, 04:41 AM   #177
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Well, they're actually doing several projects at Shin-Ōsaka:
  • Construction of an additional side platform (Platform 27) north of Platform 26, using a portion of the ROW initially secured by Hankyū Corporation for its future proposed connection to Shin-Ōsaka. The additional platform is needed to help cope with the opening of the full length of the Kyūshū Shinkansen in March 2011. This will increase the Shinkansen platform capacity at the station from seven tracks (three island platforms plus one side platform) to eight tracks (three island platforms plus two side platforms).
  • Expansion of the sidings at the Hakata end from four to two. This is in conjunction with the new Platform 27, and is also designed to increase the station's capacity to handle trains.
  • Renovation of the station concourse, again part of the need to accomodate additional demand for the Kyūshū Shinkansen. The details for this project are in the posts below, but the project calls for expanding the JR West faregates, revamping the Shinkansen transfer faregates, constructing a new waiting room, and giving the existing facilities a facelift.
  • Construction of the Shin-Ōsaka Hankyū Building, being undertaken by Hankyū Corporation. I will post more details below, but this will be a typical station tenant building development and will incorporate some of the station functions, namely a bus terminal on the ground floor, and will be directly connected to both the Midōsuji Line and the JR West / JR Central portions of the station.

In terms of non-Shinkansen projects, they are also bringing the Ōsaka-Higashi Line into the station, and there are various other proposals.
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Old November 7th, 2010, 04:42 AM   #178
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JR Central track / platform construction at Shin-Ōsaka Station
http://jr-central.co.jp/news/release/nws000532.html

Quote:
At JR Central, we have been conducting large-scale improvement works at Shin-Ōsaka Station since 2007, with the aim of increasing the Tōkaidō Shinkansen's operational flexibility, and strenghtening its adaptability during disasters and in other situations, as well as further improving passenger service.

This project involves a large number of difficult construction works—including switching out multiple tracks and constructing a new platform directly above Shin-Midōsuji (National Route 423)—all while maintaining daily Shinkansen operations.

Starting June 27, 2010, we will achieve a major milestone in the project and construct the girder for Platform 27.

This construction work will require the closure during evening periods of Shin-Midōsuji directly beneath the Shinkansen viaduct, after due-diligence in notifying the public with the assistance of concerned agencies.

We apologize for the inconvenience to users of Shin-Midōsuji, and ask for your cooperation and understanding.

Shin-Ōsaka Station Improvement Works
  1. Additional platforms and other facilities (announced July 9, 2007)
    • Construction of a new track and platform (Platform 27)
    • Construction of two additional sidings within the station
  2. Improvements to the station concourse (announced July 3, 2008)
    • Establishment of a pedestrian access route to the areas north of the station (connected with the Shin-Ōsaka Hankyū Building)
    • Improvements within and outside the station concourse
Details of the platform girder construction work
We will place the platform girder, which will become the future platform for Track 27, above Shin-Midōsuji on the north side of the station.
  1. Construction method
    • We will use a "sliding bridge" construction method.
    • After gradually moving the 105 m long platform girder horizontally from the Hakata end of the station, we will lower it into the specific location. (This work will take place over the course of six moves).
  2. Date (scheduled):
    Six days between Sunday, June 27, 2010 and Monday, July 19, 2010
    (Work will take place from the late evening to the early morning, e.g., 1:00 am to 6:00 am)
Other
  1. The date of the work may change depending on weather conditions and other factors.
  2. Information regarding the street closure will be provided in the Ōsaka area via television, radio, newspaper, and sign displays.
Red section on the left is for the two new track sidings and shed (scheduled to be completed in FY2012), while the one on the right is for the new 400 m platform (scheduled to be completed in FY2013).



Construction process for the platform girder.
The green sections are temporary sections to allow them to slide the permanent girder into place.

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Old November 7th, 2010, 04:43 AM   #179
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JR West to revamp Shin-Ōsaka Station concourse
http://www.westjr.co.jp/news/newslis...74711_799.html

Quote:
Currently, Central Japan Railway Company is proceeding with construction of a new Shinkansen platform at Shin-Ōsaka Station. In concert with this project, JR West will undertake improvements to the station and has been conducting various studies in an effort to further enhance the convenience of the station.

The improvement plan for the station concourse has recently been compiled, and we have reached the stage where we can now begin actual construction.

Improvement plan components
  • Improvements to the ticketing area and faregate area
    • In addition to increasing the number of automatic faregates at the East Exit, we will renovate this gate to improve visibility.
    • We will renovate the ticketing hall at the Shinkansen transfer gate, alleviating conflict between transferring passengers and passengers queuing up to purchase tickets.
    • On the south side of the Central Exit, we will distribute tourist-related information and construct a new space for passengers to pick up tickets purchased via telephone or online.
  • Other improvements
    • We will construct a new central waiting room and restrooms on the south side of the Central Exit to replace the previous facilities, which are currently closed due to construction. We will also construct new escalators from the second floor to the third floor to increase passenger convenience.
Cost: Approx. ¥8.8 billion
Construction schedule: March 2010 to end of FY2012
Besides being the Shinkansen terminal for Ōsaka City, Shin-Ōsaka also serves as a terminal for many limited express trains. Urban service from the station to other points in the Kansai region is primarily provided by JR’s network of shin-kaisoku trains, while the Ōsaka Municipal Subway Midōsuji Line connects north-south to other points within Ōsaka City, including Ōsaka Station (JR’s main terminal), Shinsaibashi, and Namba.

Daily ridership:
  • JR West: 46,900 daily entries (2007)
  • JR Central: 65,500 daily entries (2006)
  • Ōsaka Municipal Subway: 133,000 daily entries and exits (2007)

Renderings:
Source: JR West

East Exit for the JR lines (non-Shinkansen trains)



Central waiting room





Ticketing area

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Old November 7th, 2010, 04:44 AM   #180
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Shin-Ōsaka Station construction update: Part 1

A few pictures (2010.07) of the construction work in the concourse part of the station.
Source: http://blog.goo.ne.jp/so-long7/

The Central Exit area is pretty much a construction zone now:



Same location in March 2010, before construction began:



The Midori no Madoguchi (staffed ticket counter area) is now relocated to this temporary setup.



Because of the construction, they sealed off the Sennari Hyōtan monument. This is supposed to be a replica of the battle standard used by Toyotomi Hideyoshi and is fairly famous—they have station signage (see the top left of the picture) that directs visitors to it. For now, though, all they have are these posters on the columns.

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