daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > World Development News Forums > General Urban Developments

General Urban Developments Discussions of projects shorter than 100m/300ft. Also, please post all other threads not specified in other Development News subforums here.



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old July 2nd, 2011, 10:13 PM   #2401
DarJoLe
Registered User
 
DarJoLe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London
Posts: 19,834
Likes (Received): 6363

None of the canals inside the Park are green.
DarJoLe no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old July 3rd, 2011, 01:43 AM   #2402
msl1
msl
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 195
Likes (Received): 130

No, but the Hertford Union Canal and the Hackney Cut are - the latter runs around the easter perimeter and will be visible from the park.
msl1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 3rd, 2011, 02:48 AM   #2403
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 23,938
Likes (Received): 7186

Could it be excess of biomass?
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 3rd, 2011, 07:23 PM   #2404
msl1
msl
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 195
Likes (Received): 130

No - its 100% natural canal weed - I'm just wondering if theyre going to clean it out games time or let nature do its thing. Anyway, theres far more important things….!
msl1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 3rd, 2011, 07:27 PM   #2405
msl1
msl
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 195
Likes (Received): 130

Great pic of the park wetlands on this new webcam:

http://www.london2012.com/webcams/ol...k-wetlands.php
msl1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 3rd, 2011, 09:15 PM   #2406
Angle42
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 235
Likes (Received): 1

Quote:
Originally Posted by msl1 View Post
Great pic of the park wetlands on this new webcam:

http://www.london2012.com/webcams/ol...k-wetlands.php
Yep, they finally got round to labelling the camera correctly. This has been viewable as the "IBC" for some time...
Angle42 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 3rd, 2011, 09:39 PM   #2407
pagey17
Registered User
 
pagey17's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Leeds, Yorkshire
Posts: 955
Likes (Received): 3

Lush
pagey17 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 4th, 2011, 08:04 PM   #2408
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 23,938
Likes (Received): 7186

Quote:
Originally Posted by msl1 View Post
Great pic of the park wetlands on this new webcam:

http://www.london2012.com/webcams/ol...k-wetlands.php
This is the best looking view of the park so far.
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2011, 02:46 AM   #2409
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 23,938
Likes (Received): 7186

Quote:
Westfield Stratford City "tip of the iceberg" regeneration from London 2012 Games, claims Johnson

London Mayor Boris Johnson has claimed that the construction of the £1.45 billion ($2.33 billion) Westfield Stratford City retail centre here that overlooks the Olympic Park is "just the tip of the iceberg" in showing the accelerated regeneration of East London that will result from the city hosting the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games.

As a result of winning the London 2012 Games in Singapore in 2005, phase one of the construction of Westfield Stratford City was completed around seven years ahead of schedule while research by Volterra, commissioned by Westfield Group, estimates that completion of phase two of the development will be up to 25 years ahead of the investor's plans.

In total, the London 2012 Games are set to inject around £2 billion ($3.2 billion) into the capital's economy and create 10,000 permanent jobs many years earlier than forecast according to the report published today, with Johnson stating that Westfield is an early illustration of the changes that are to come in east London.

"Our commitment to transform the job prospects of Londoners and bring lasting economic benefits as a result of the 2012 Games is already becoming a reality," said Johnson. "The future of this long-neglected area is looking bright thanks to both the Games and the vision of Westfield Group.

"And this is just the tip of the iceberg as investors from across the planet see the incredible opportunities arising as we develop this brand new district in our great city."

The jobs created at Westfield Stratford City are in addition to the wider jobs and skills legacy being delivered through 2012 Games programmes, which include lifting more than 25,000 people into new jobs. In addition, 400 apprentices have been trained on the Olympic Park site, while a further 40,000 training places have been provided and 50,000 people have received support to get back into work.

The figures were revealed as the London Mayor joined Stratford City's development director John Burton and Newham Mayor, Sir Robin Wales on a tour of the retail centre here. The trio met construction workers finishing off the site as well as some of the very first people who have been offered jobs there after attending Westfield, Newham and Seetec's unique retail academy, The Skills Place Newham, which is supplying skilled workers to operate the centre and its shops.

"This project is the first piece of legacy for east London and, with the creation of 10,000 permanent new jobs from our opening on September 13, it demonstrates the scale of regeneration taking place in this part of the city," said Burton.

"Although this project was going to happen with or without the Games, London's successful bid to host the Olympics gave us all a fixed deadline and has therefore accelerated the delivery of the investment and job creation by up to 25 years."

Sir Robin added: "Our great partnership with Westfield has enabled us to set up Skills Place Newham which will equip local people with the training and expertise they need to get back into work. We have already been successful in helping more than 7,500 people into work through Newham's Workplace programme which was developed to make sure local people receive advice about their employment options and have the right skills for their chosen career. Workplace will now work in close partnership with Skills Place Newham to help us deliver a lasting legacy of sustained employment for our residents."
http://insidethegames.biz/olympics/s...claims-johnson
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2011, 02:35 PM   #2410
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 23,938
Likes (Received): 7186

Quote:
Olympic Test Events Begin

Preparations for London 2012 are gearing up with test sports events and security agencies being put through their paces.

There’s already been some testing for the marathon and race walking (on 30th May. Anyone spot that? We know it was a bank holiday, but still…) and the equestrian invitational started in Greenwich Park yesterday with a small protest from people who think it’s all a terrible idea – we’d make a joke about horses and stable doors but there are some puns even we won’t stoop to. You should be able to get a glimpse of the cross country racing today if you stand by the right bit of fence. The Modern Pentathlon World Cup Final happens this weekend in Greenwich and Crystal Palace, too.

Other events coming up (not all planned by LOCOG, but useful practice) include road cycling starting from The Mall, the London Triathlon, badminton at Wembley Arena, basketball at the new venue in the Olympic Park, marathon swimming in Hyde Park and beach volleyball at Horse Guards Parade.

The Home Office is also getting in on the action to see how police and emergency services would cope with a crisis during the Games. At least 10 exercises are planned to test how well all the various agencies work together – and the Met’s radio system has had its capacity increased to handle the expected extra officers.
http://londonist.com/2011/07/olympic...ents-begin.php
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2011, 03:15 PM   #2411
DarJoLe
Registered User
 
DarJoLe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: London
Posts: 19,834
Likes (Received): 6363

Quote:
Originally Posted by msl1 View Post
No, but the Hertford Union Canal and the Hackney Cut are - the latter runs around the easter perimeter and will be visible from the park.
No they won't.
DarJoLe no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2011, 06:24 PM   #2412
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 23,938
Likes (Received): 7186

For those too lazy to open the Time Out link.

__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 5th, 2011, 10:32 PM   #2413
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 23,938
Likes (Received): 7186

Quote:
Officials weigh Wellcome’s all-or-nothing bid

The Wellcome Trust has developed a plan for a 1m sq ft science campus on the Olympic Park that offers two immediate attractions for the government: the creation of a world-class science centre and a platform for wider economic regeneration of the deprived area of east London.

“This is an opportunity to create a kernel of a Silicon Valley rival,” said Peter Pereira Gray, head of investment at Wellcome, which is proposing to take over the freehold of the whole of the Olympic Park in return for a £1bn investment.

The centre, the cornerstone of that investment, offers the potential to be a key part of the government’s attempts to foster technology industries between Old Street and Stratford. It would help to make good what David Cameron last November called the “incredible possibilities of the Olympic Park to help make east London one of the world’s great technology centres”.

Ministers have been told that the “life sciences innovation centre”, to be converted from the Olympic media centre, would create not just 7,000 direct jobs but generate up to 2.5 times that number in service jobs in Newham, Hackney and other parts of east London.

“This is a site of national importance,” said Mr Pereira Gray. “We can create a significant economic driver through the innovation centre. It will act as a catalyst for economic regeneration. This builds on the prime minister’s vision of a technology corridor.”

The problem is that the proposal has come rather late in the day. Legacy planning for the Olympic Park is well advanced. Parts of the park are being put out to tender – a decision on the preferred bidder for the athletes’ village is imminent, while expressions of interest have been sought for the media centre.

The government envisages developing parkland to create 11,000 homes over and above the 2,800 units the village will yield. But tendering for the park as a whole was not contemplated. Two people close to the process said that the Wellcome bid was being taken seriously by the government, although they added that it would be unimaginable for officials to grant any sort of exclusivity without offering the opportunity first to the wider market.

Nor is it conceivable that the government will halt the tender of the village – in which Wellcome is one of three shortlisted bidders. That begs the question: what happens if Wellcome loses the auction?

Wellcome has made clear it is all or nothing: that the village proceeds are critical to its park investment fund. Its innovation centre would provide space for two universities, as well as facilities that would allow technologies to be started and developed in an “incubator” and an “accelerator”.

There would be additional space for offices, conference facilities, a data centre and communal areas. Under the trust’s plans, the athletes’ village and the buildings in and around the innovation centre would be developed first, followed by the first tranche of housing to the north of the site.

The trust would use the proceeds from residential sales to fund the development. As part of the plan, it is attempting to acquire the freehold of the entire park, which would see it take on a management role across all legacy concerns from sporting to commercial.

The government has been offered a future cut in the profits of the site, although Mr Pereira Gray would not say how much it was proposing. The upsides of the Wellcome proposal include not just a Silicon Valley contender – proceeds from the Olympic Park will pay off monies owed to other bodies to help fund the Games, £675m for the National Lottery and £600m to the London mayor’s London Development Agency.

The time frame for repaying those funds would shrink rapidly if a deal was done with the trust. The calculation to be done in Whitehall is whether Wellcome’s take-it-or-leave-it approach is genuine or whether a modified version of the “holistic” plan is negotiable.
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/1d396ab6-a...#axzz1RGF9qT8U
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 7th, 2011, 12:39 AM   #2414
msl1
msl
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 195
Likes (Received): 130

Quote:
Originally Posted by DarJoLe View Post
No they won't.
Please elaborate. How do you know?
msl1 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 7th, 2011, 05:30 PM   #2415
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 23,938
Likes (Received): 7186

Quote:
The men, women and birds of prey who make the Olympic Park work

In a little over 12 months, after years of planning, sawing, drilling and hammering, the finished Olympic Park will be unveiled to the public. It's expected to have cost up to £7.2 billion and is set to be a visual spectacle for the world.



But what about the people for whom being on this building site has become just another day in the office? From builders to nurses, caterers to policemen, this patch of east London has played host to a total workforce of 12,635 people.

As the work on the 2012 Olympic park begins to wrap up, we discover the weird and wonderful job titles created in the run-up to the 2012 games.

The Falconer
Jason Keddie, 43, with Amy the Harris Hawk

Job: I fly birds of prey as a deterrent towards pigeons and other birds in the Aquatic Centre. Pigeons are a health and safety issue because the construction site needs to be kept as clear as possible. I have a two-hour morning shift at 6am and a two-hour night shift.
Track record: Falconry has been a hobby since childhood. I worked as an air-conditioning engineer until six years ago when I was given an opportunity to turn my hobby into a job. I worked for a London bus company where I would clear depots of pigeons.
Olympic victory: I don't know how I got the job - it must have been through word of mouth.
Park perks: I didn't get any tickets, but I'm hoping I will be there during the Games to keep pigeons away.
Long-distance: I don't know what life holds. It's been fantastic for my CV because everyone knows that you have to be special to work here. I hope it will lead to plenty of falconry jobs.
Site-souvenirs: I've got so many photographs because I'm proud to be a part of the Games in some way. When my children watch the swimming on telly next year, I can say: "Look. Dad sorted that out."

The artist-in-residence
Neville Gabie, 52

Job: Making the construction visible to a wider audience. Pieces will include a short film involving many of those working on the site.
Track record: I studied sculpture at the Royal College of Art. I then ran a project in a tower block with artists, writers and residents and went on to work as an artist on a building site for a shopping centre. My projects tend to be in response to sites and communities.
Olympic victory: There was a stringent application and interview process.
Park perks: The real perk has been meeting the people who've built the venues. When I was at the Aquatic Centre, I spent some time with the tilers and their skills are extraordinary. If the length of the pool is out by more than 5mm it doesn't qualify as an Olympic distance.
Long-distance: I think it will take some time to absorb all that's happened.
Site souvenirs: I've collected odd things. I've got a rickety, homemade saw bench from the stadium that I hope we will use in an exhibition.

...
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standa...c-park-work.do
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 7th, 2011, 07:03 PM   #2416
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 23,938
Likes (Received): 7186

by louisemarston on Flickr.







http://www.flickr.com/photos/louisem...7627132498496/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/louisem...7627132498496/
http://www.flickr.com/photos/louisem...7627132498496/
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 7th, 2011, 08:12 PM   #2417
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 23,938
Likes (Received): 7186

Quote:
Major road restrictions for London weeks before Games

Road restrictions will be put in place across London weeks before the Olympic Games are due to begin, the Standard has learned. Drivers will be banned from turning right on some routes, traffic lights will be phased and parking bays will be suspended two weeks before the 2012 event to speed up VIP traffic.

The restrictions - to benefit athletes and officials who arrive early - will mean disruption for Londoners will be far greater than previously suggested. Transport chiefs at the International Olympic Committee (IOC) were examining the detail of the Olympic Route Network (ORN) at its executive board meeting in Durban today.

An IOC source said the plans could cause problems: "The Mayor needs to be clearer. We are concerned that they will have to do something drastic such as ban some cars and there could be a backlash."

Details of the road restriction timetable were revealed in an interview with Transport for London commissioner Peter Hendy. He said TfL will begin the work at the start of the school holidays when, it says, traffic volumes drop about 10 per cent. But motorists face further disruption as key routes will also be suspended at night and over weekends next summer as the 100-mile network of priority of Olympic routes is installed, work which includes painting road markings and removing bollards.

Most critics of the lanes accept that they are essential to athletes and officials but want VIPs and sponsors to use public transport instead of chauffeur-driven BMW cars.

Mr Hendy declined to be drawn on this but insisted that for the opening ceremony on July 27 he would make members of the IOC take chartered coaches from their Park Lane hotels to the Olympic Park to ease pressure on the roads. He said: "The dignitaries will be in buses on opening ceremony night whether they like it or not."

Mr Hendy declined to say what maximum journey times along the Olympic lanes TfL had guaranteed to Olympics chiefs, though it is thought original target times will not be met. It is thought the journey on the Olympic lanes between Park Lane and the Olympic Park will be about 25 minutes.

Mr Hendy said normal speed limits would apply. "The ORN is a modification to a road network to produce reliable journeys for the Olympic family so they don't have to drive at 90mph to get to the Games on time. We don't want to publicise the journey times because they depend on other measures (to be agreed) such as (a ban on) right-hand turns." He said that phasing traffic lights green to speed through VIPs on Olympic lanes would also benefit motorists in the adjacent lane, such as the Victoria Embankment.

Planned roadworks on the ORN will be banned from the end of next March and this ban will be widened to all A and B roads in London during the Games to keep traffic flowing. There are concerns that this will prompt utility companies to move all works to minor roads next summer.

TfL have confirmed that 35 bus routes will be diverted due to the Olympic lanes (21 around venues and 14 elsewhere) but it is thought this number may almost double once plans are finalised.

However, Mr Hendy insisted that the VIP-only Olympic lanes would not be imposed until the day of the opening ceremony. He said: "The essential thing in London is that circumstances are not practical to have the Olympic lanes except when they are needed. They said in Athens they put them in earlier so people could get used to them but here the reverse is true."
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standa...efore-games.do
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 7th, 2011, 11:07 PM   #2418
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 23,938
Likes (Received): 7186

Quote:
Work on London cable car across River Thames begins

Work has begun on a £50m cable car project to link two Olympic venues on opposite sides of the River Thames. Digging for the foundations of the two new stations in the Royal Victoria Dock and on the Greenwich Peninsula began on Thursday.

Once finished, the cable cars will run 50m (164ft) above the river carrying up to 2,500 people an hour. It will connect the O2 arena in North Greenwich to the Excel exhibition centre at the Royal Victoria Dock.

The North Station in the Royal Victoria Dock is in east London while the South Station in Greenwich is in south-east London. A Transport for London (TfL) spokeswoman said completing the project by next summer was an "aspiration", but trying to get it up and running for the Games would be "challenging" and was never a plan.

She added that the cable car project was not a part of TfL's Olympic transport strategy and it was not essential for the Games. TfL is providing the upfront costs for the project.

Originally the project was to be privately funded and estimated to cost £25m, but earlier this year TfL said it would fund the project to ensure its "quick delivery". The cable car will provide a "much-needed river crossing" and a "bird's eye view" of the capital, London Mayor Boris Johnson said. But John Biggs, Labour member of the London Assembly, criticised the scheme saying it was "no substitute" for a bridge across the Thames.

Caroline Pidgeon, the Liberal Democrat leader on the assembly, has also criticised the doubling of its projected cost. A consortium, led by Mace, is carrying out the building work and will later run the cable cars.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-14059134
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 8th, 2011, 02:13 AM   #2419
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 23,938
Likes (Received): 7186

Quote:
We're in the money! (and it's all thanks to Gordon Brown)

David Cameron has little reason to say a good word about Gordon Brown. But, next year, as he takes his seat for the 2012 Olympics opening ceremony, he may reflect that the former Prime Minister has been responsible, albeit unwittingly, for an unexpected success story. London, the only city to host the Olympics three times, will also be the first in modern times to come in under budget. Not quite a golden legacy but at least, in this area, Labour has left Cameron some money - the Government will be getting back more than £800 million from its Olympic budget.

To appreciate how unexpected this is, consider the spat between the chairman of arguably the most powerful Commons committee and the highest civil servant in the department responsible for the Olympics. It came in 2008, just a year after Brown's government had finally announced that the budget for the Games had risen almost four times, from its original estimate of £2.375 billion to £9.3 billion.

Edward Leigh, then chairman of the Public Accounts Committee, could not have been blunter with Jonathan Stephens, Permanent Secretary to the Department of Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS). "What worries me is that, judging by your record, I do not have any confidence in your ability to plan ahead," he said. "I think what is going to happen in the run-up to these Games in 2012 is that you are going to start panicking, things will be half-finished and you'll start throwing money at it."

Stephens defended himself, saying the Games were on a sound financial footing, but he was clearly not believed. The PAC report on the budget was as damming as any Commons Olympics report. In essence, it said that the government had not been transparent and it could not be sure that the £9.3 billion budget would turn out to be the final cost.

Three years on, the picture could not be more different. Last month, as the Government released its quarterly economic report on Olympic costs, Dennis Hone, chief executive of the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA), announced that, with 83 per cent of construction complete, savings of more than £830 million had been made.

Some of the savings are due to the Brown downturn. But that amounts to £80 million as a result of inflation - which was expected to push up construction costs - no longer being a factor. The downturn has led to some venues, such as the one for basketball, being made temporary and others, such as the one for fencing, being scrapped. However, most of the savings the ODA claims proudly are due to getting value for money and keeping a tight rein on delivery time. The ODA's recently departed chief executive David Higgins, knighted in the recent honours list, can claim credit for this. But the real story is that this is also a wonderful illustration of the British muddling through to the right result.

London 2012 was always a huge fight against Brown and the Treasury until the budget was finally agreed in March 2007. The bid was launched against a background where bidding for the Olympics was like waiting for a British winner at Wimbledon. In the decade leading up to the success in Singapore in 2005, two bids by Manchester and one by Birmingham had failed. Then, having secured the 2005 World Athletics Championships, the British behaved almost like a Third World country and gave the championships back. The reason given was that Britain could not afford to build the required facilities. There was also the ongoing saga at Wembley and the bail-out of the 2002 Manchester Commonwealth Games.

Brown, in any case, did not care for the Olympics and had set his heart on getting the World Cup back to this country. Indeed, on becoming Prime Minister, he bounced the Football Association into bidding for the World Cup. He always saw the Olympics as a Tony Blair initiative.

Brown's reluctance was all the stranger because of the alliance backing the bid - that of Tessa Jowell, then Secretary of State for Culture Media and Sport, and Ken Livingstone, then London Mayor. Jowell had persuaded Blair to back the Olympics by telling him that it would be a great shame if the fourth largest economy [as the UK then was], could not even bid for the greatest show on earth. She had also persuaded him not to vacate Downing Street when he was under pressure from Brown to do so.

Brown was even less pleased to learn that Cherie Blair, who is also close to Jowell, wanted to head the London bid. Indeed, she was so keen that I was asked to brief her as to what would be involved. The tea-time meeting at the Reform Club, to where she had been brought by Michael Beloff, the QC who shares her chambers, demonstrated that she certainly felt she could do the job. She left the meeting telling me that, "I will have to talk to him." She did not have to specify who "him" was. But in the end, the security problems that would have been created by a Prime Minister's wife hanging around the hotel lobbies of the world, cosying up to members of the International Olympic Committee, proved too daunting.

Livingstone, a long-standing enemy of Brown, had no interest in sport but saw the Olympics as regenerating the East End. He persuaded the British Olympic Association to move from its original choice of west London.

It was Livingstone who, in a now famous meeting on Jowell's sofa at DCMS, agreed the funding package. The Government had increased the £1.8 billion costs estimated by a British Olympic Association study to £2.375 billion. Treasury insiders have confirmed that officials, not expecting a win in Singapore, did not examine the figures in any great detail.

Livingstone has since told me, "The Treasury saw the Olympics as a toy for Tessa and me. They did not expect us to win." The Treasury may well have been proved right, had London had to fight Madrid in the final round instead of Paris. Keith Mills, deputy chairman of the bid, had calculated that, in a London versus Madrid fight, London would lose by five votes.

On returning from Singapore, the Government carried on as if the budget calculated before the unexpected victory would not change. As the legislation for the London Games was being considered by Parliament in January 2006, a briefing note given to MPs reiterated the original figure but it did also mention the Lower Lea Valley Development, estimated at £800 million. It said those costs "are not associated with the Olympics". There was also £650 million for the athletes' village but this, it promised, "will be privately funded as part of the broader development of Stratford City".

However, behind the scenes, a titanic battle was being waged between the DCMS, the Mayor's office and the Treasury. Brown's department, having finally looked at the figures in detail, was insisting on a 60 per cent contingency.

I was then the BBC's sports editor and in February 2007 I revealed that the budget had risen to £9.3 billion. On the day of my 10 O'Clock News broadcast, I got a very angry message from an insider in the Mayor's office saying I had been spun a line by the Treasury about costs. I was accused of falling for the game the Treasury was playing with the DCMS. The final figure, I was told, would be nothing like what I had revealed. A month later, the Government confirmed the budget of £9.3 billion.

The Treasury had insisted on the huge budget contingency because it expected the Olympics to take place while Britain was booming. The recession would soon change things but it also meant that the Treasury's contingency was to come in very handy.

The downturn's first casualty was the Olympic Village as the developer, Lend Lease, could not raise the necessary money to build it. The Government decided to fund the Village using £650 million from the contingency pot. Another £135 million of the contingency was used to build the media centre, part of which will be temporary.

So, in what may well prove the greatest of ironies, Gordon Brown, who least cared about the Games, has left his successor a valuable pot for a wholly unintended Olympic bonus.
http://www.thisislondon.co.uk/standa...s-to-gordon.do
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old July 9th, 2011, 12:28 AM   #2420
PortoNuts
Registered User
 
PortoNuts's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Porto
Posts: 23,938
Likes (Received): 7186

Aquatics Centre



Olympic Stadium



Westfield Stratford City





http://www.flickr.com/photos/9190307...th/5913236343/
__________________
Got one head for money and one head for sin..
PortoNuts no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
london, olympic games 2012, olympic stadium, olympics

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 05:59 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2017 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

Hosted by Blacksun, dedicated to this site too!
Forum server management by DaiTengu