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Old July 29th, 2008, 01:26 PM   #641
DarJoLe
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This article shows how London's stadium is the future of Olympic stadiums for cities who don't want or need them.

Arup Associates gets ahead of the game on the Olympic stadium of the future
BD Mag - Sport and Leisure- July 08
By Elaine Knutt

Never mind this summer’s Olympics, what will the games of 2020 look like? Arup Associates proposes some radical innovations

The recyclable Olympics? According to Arup Associates, that’s so yesterday. Think the world-touring Olympics, the caravanserai Olympics, the Olympics that pitch up and have a party on Mombasa beach or the favelas of Rio de Janeiro. Imagine fully demountable stadiums, and a 50m Olympic swimming pool pulled around the world by supertankers. The relocatable Olympics would regenerate a region and put it under the world spotlight, energise the local economy, and demonstrate that governments need neither state communism nor rampant capitalism to join the Olympic party.



And Arup Associates, BD’s Sport & Leisure Architect of the Year, has patented the design innovation that could make it all possible — a combination of inflatable cantilevered roofs and advanced temporary seating. The grand launch isn’t until later this year, but BD Magazine had a sneak preview of white inflatables that could eventually have logos, colours or patterning applied. “It’s a bit like the Coliseum; it can be dressed in different ways so that people can bring their own cultural view point,” says architecture director Dipesh Patel.

In truth, the appeal has more to do with democracy than design, but it’s certainly a compelling concept. And Patel puts a strong case for a man who might be designing himself out of future stadium commissions. “You remediate derelict or underused land, sort the infastructure out, but rather than spending hundreds of millions on a public stadium, you rent it from the IOC,” he says. “It’s all about money today — how rich you are. Everyone says Africa needs to partake in the Olympics, but there’s no way they can spend the kind of money that’s been spent since Los Angeles.”

Arup Associates’ vision for the Olympics is also a logical extension to its design trajectory in the sports sector. Its portfolio doesn’t include architectural icons, or monuments to their sports, or even any recognisably “sports” buildings at all. So King’s School in Cambridge will have a new sports centre that passes itself off as an arts building; nearby, Cambridge University’s new sports facilities will be housed in three softly curving biomes, while the St Vincent National Stadium in St Vincent & the Grenadines is an innovative, ground-hugging piece of “stealth” architecture.

Where some sports buildings feel like the architectural equivalent of athletes on steroids — big, bulky and not much use to anyone in the long run — Arup Associates aims to design sustainably and modestly. “Until recently, we were building these big, expensive, energy-

hungry stadiums and using them very little, says Patel. “It’s a reflection of how rich societies in the west are. We have to to get a bit more realistic about what these buildings can do beyond sport, otherwise they just sit empty.”

The practice’s arguments on sustainability and legacy are similar to those that led London 2012 to its two-part stadium solution, whereby a crown of 55,000 seats will be later be shipped to another venue, leaving a sunken 20,000 seater bowl at the heart of the Olympic park. But do post-Olympic cities even need stadiums to keep the Olympic regeneration flame burning?

“The real legacy is clearing up the land, and the park left behind,” says David Parsons, an architect with the practice. “People switched on to Barcelona because of the whole development of the beach, but the actual stadium is decrepit and falling apart.”

And Patel would go further, asking why we should retain the Olympic stadium as a repository of memories when our imaginations can do the job far more efficiently. “Why not completely remove it, have an entirely demountable stadium?” he say. “When people cross the Equator, all you see is a sign. Just leaving the finish line in the park might have been enough.”



Arup Associates already has a track record in doing things differently. It was set up by Ove Arup in 1963 as a multi-disciplinary practice of architects plus services and structural engineers, an identity that is today embedded in the four-strong management board (two architectural directors, a finance director and engineering director), and in the multi-disciplinary teams formed for each project. “The architect drives and all the others put in their part — it’s highly interactive,” says senior mechanical engineer Alan Ross.

Projects such as a new headquarters and TV studios for Sky Television, a £40 million engineering faculty at Coventry University and offices for British Land will have well-crafted good design as the common denominator rather than a signature architectural style. Staff work on a range of building types, taking ideas across sectors and spreading expertise evenly. “People have been able to dip into sports projects and move on,” says Parsons, “so we have a breadth of sports knowledge across the practice.”

But to outsiders, working exclusively with in-house engineers can seem limiting, while the practice’s matrix management style, and being in the shadow of its parent firm Arup, give it a lower PR profile than others of its 120-strong size. So is Arup Associates seething with frustrated egos and breakaway plots? The truth, according to a former insider, is both more boring and successful. “The real strength is in the integrated way of working. It’s not the solution on every occasion, but it is appealing to some clients. It can be a big advantage for architects to work with an engineer at their elbow.”

The advantages can be very clear in sports projects. Take the Worrell, Weekes & Walcott Stand at the Kensington Oval in Barbados, its innovative shape akin to three cones pushed into one other with the gaps between admitting light and air. “We wanted it to have a certain form for environmental reasons,” says Parsons, “and then the complex geometry was possible through iterative design, with the architect and engineer passing 3D models to one another.”

The next innovative project in that part of the world will be the St Vincent’s cricket stadium. It’s literally as well as metaphorically down to earth, a bowl excavated out of the ground with grassy seating banks built up on one side. The project demonstrates Arup Associates’ ideas on adding uses to provide long-term viability — a market will shelter in the stands’ undercroft, toilet and shower pods in the boxes allow the stadium to be used as a residential training camp, and a multi-purpose suite can host conferences and weddings. “We’re trying to build a room for the entire island,” says Patel.

Closer to home, Ross is working on the refurbishment of Crystal Palace swimming pool and sports hall, which will be used as Olympic training venues. Originally commissioned to renew services, the £12 million project has grown to now include renovating the interior surfaces. But a major part of the project is upgrading a 50m swimming pool that in fact measured 49.98 m. “We had to take the tiles off, scrabble back the concrete, and spend an enormous amount of money to make it suitable for Olympic training,” he says.

But Crystal Palace is so far Arup Associates’ only contribution to London 2012, a situation that Patel finds disappointing but undaunting. “What I’m really interested in is taking our inflatable roof, and thinking about some of the other venues that haven’t been thought about yet, like hockey. Let’s practise what we preach about coming in quite late, quickly and cheaply, with really innovative solutions, and going at it through a different lens.”

As the Olympic budget comes under increasing pressure and thoughts turn to the most appropriate legacy for a festival of sport and democracy, Patel may yet have his chance.
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Old July 29th, 2008, 03:00 PM   #642
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^

That's how Melbourne would do it if we ever host again (we'll bid for sure in the 2020's).

A stadium at Dockland's that can be downsized later. I can't see them really using the MCG as the main stadium again-- the IOC does still want something fresh (however I can see it being used to host Football, similar to Wembley).
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Old July 29th, 2008, 07:11 PM   #643
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DarJoLe View Post
This article shows how London's stadium is the future of Olympic stadiums for cities who don't want or need them.

Arup Associates gets ahead of the game on the Olympic stadium of the future
BD Mag - Sport and Leisure- July 08
By Elaine Knutt

Never mind this summer’s Olympics, what will the games of 2020 look like? Arup Associates proposes some radical innovations

The recyclable Olympics? According to Arup Associates, that’s so yesterday. Think the world-touring Olympics, the caravanserai Olympics, the Olympics that pitch up and have a party on Mombasa beach or the favelas of Rio de Janeiro. Imagine fully demountable stadiums, and a 50m Olympic swimming pool pulled around the world by supertankers. The relocatable Olympics would regenerate a region and put it under the world spotlight, energise the local economy, and demonstrate that governments need neither state communism nor rampant capitalism to join the Olympic party.



And Arup Associates, BD’s Sport & Leisure Architect of the Year, has patented the design innovation that could make it all possible — a combination of inflatable cantilevered roofs and advanced temporary seating. The grand launch isn’t until later this year, but BD Magazine had a sneak preview of white inflatables that could eventually have logos, colours or patterning applied. “It’s a bit like the Coliseum; it can be dressed in different ways so that people can bring their own cultural view point,” says architecture director Dipesh Patel.

In truth, the appeal has more to do with democracy than design, but it’s certainly a compelling concept. And Patel puts a strong case for a man who might be designing himself out of future stadium commissions. “You remediate derelict or underused land, sort the infastructure out, but rather than spending hundreds of millions on a public stadium, you rent it from the IOC,” he says. “It’s all about money today — how rich you are. Everyone says Africa needs to partake in the Olympics, but there’s no way they can spend the kind of money that’s been spent since Los Angeles.”

Arup Associates’ vision for the Olympics is also a logical extension to its design trajectory in the sports sector. Its portfolio doesn’t include architectural icons, or monuments to their sports, or even any recognisably “sports” buildings at all. So King’s School in Cambridge will have a new sports centre that passes itself off as an arts building; nearby, Cambridge University’s new sports facilities will be housed in three softly curving biomes, while the St Vincent National Stadium in St Vincent & the Grenadines is an innovative, ground-hugging piece of “stealth” architecture.

Where some sports buildings feel like the architectural equivalent of athletes on steroids — big, bulky and not much use to anyone in the long run — Arup Associates aims to design sustainably and modestly. “Until recently, we were building these big, expensive, energy-

hungry stadiums and using them very little, says Patel. “It’s a reflection of how rich societies in the west are. We have to to get a bit more realistic about what these buildings can do beyond sport, otherwise they just sit empty.”

The practice’s arguments on sustainability and legacy are similar to those that led London 2012 to its two-part stadium solution, whereby a crown of 55,000 seats will be later be shipped to another venue, leaving a sunken 20,000 seater bowl at the heart of the Olympic park. But do post-Olympic cities even need stadiums to keep the Olympic regeneration flame burning?

“The real legacy is clearing up the land, and the park left behind,” says David Parsons, an architect with the practice. “People switched on to Barcelona because of the whole development of the beach, but the actual stadium is decrepit and falling apart.”

And Patel would go further, asking why we should retain the Olympic stadium as a repository of memories when our imaginations can do the job far more efficiently. “Why not completely remove it, have an entirely demountable stadium?” he say. “When people cross the Equator, all you see is a sign. Just leaving the finish line in the park might have been enough.”



Arup Associates already has a track record in doing things differently. It was set up by Ove Arup in 1963 as a multi-disciplinary practice of architects plus services and structural engineers, an identity that is today embedded in the four-strong management board (two architectural directors, a finance director and engineering director), and in the multi-disciplinary teams formed for each project. “The architect drives and all the others put in their part — it’s highly interactive,” says senior mechanical engineer Alan Ross.

Projects such as a new headquarters and TV studios for Sky Television, a £40 million engineering faculty at Coventry University and offices for British Land will have well-crafted good design as the common denominator rather than a signature architectural style. Staff work on a range of building types, taking ideas across sectors and spreading expertise evenly. “People have been able to dip into sports projects and move on,” says Parsons, “so we have a breadth of sports knowledge across the practice.”

But to outsiders, working exclusively with in-house engineers can seem limiting, while the practice’s matrix management style, and being in the shadow of its parent firm Arup, give it a lower PR profile than others of its 120-strong size. So is Arup Associates seething with frustrated egos and breakaway plots? The truth, according to a former insider, is both more boring and successful. “The real strength is in the integrated way of working. It’s not the solution on every occasion, but it is appealing to some clients. It can be a big advantage for architects to work with an engineer at their elbow.”

The advantages can be very clear in sports projects. Take the Worrell, Weekes & Walcott Stand at the Kensington Oval in Barbados, its innovative shape akin to three cones pushed into one other with the gaps between admitting light and air. “We wanted it to have a certain form for environmental reasons,” says Parsons, “and then the complex geometry was possible through iterative design, with the architect and engineer passing 3D models to one another.”

The next innovative project in that part of the world will be the St Vincent’s cricket stadium. It’s literally as well as metaphorically down to earth, a bowl excavated out of the ground with grassy seating banks built up on one side. The project demonstrates Arup Associates’ ideas on adding uses to provide long-term viability — a market will shelter in the stands’ undercroft, toilet and shower pods in the boxes allow the stadium to be used as a residential training camp, and a multi-purpose suite can host conferences and weddings. “We’re trying to build a room for the entire island,” says Patel.

Closer to home, Ross is working on the refurbishment of Crystal Palace swimming pool and sports hall, which will be used as Olympic training venues. Originally commissioned to renew services, the £12 million project has grown to now include renovating the interior surfaces. But a major part of the project is upgrading a 50m swimming pool that in fact measured 49.98 m. “We had to take the tiles off, scrabble back the concrete, and spend an enormous amount of money to make it suitable for Olympic training,” he says.

But Crystal Palace is so far Arup Associates’ only contribution to London 2012, a situation that Patel finds disappointing but undaunting. “What I’m really interested in is taking our inflatable roof, and thinking about some of the other venues that haven’t been thought about yet, like hockey. Let’s practise what we preach about coming in quite late, quickly and cheaply, with really innovative solutions, and going at it through a different lens.”

As the Olympic budget comes under increasing pressure and thoughts turn to the most appropriate legacy for a festival of sport and democracy, Patel may yet have his chance.
Excellent. Its something I've always thought about. Apart from a few venues, a totally temporary and travelling set of venues.
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Old July 29th, 2008, 08:52 PM   #644
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ha ha ha ha
have u ever watch ESPN?
London/UK has one of the most prestigious Football/Soccer league over the world, they call it England Premier League (EPL), ha ha ha...
small frog in a small bowl.
Hello small frog! guess you are very happy with your EPL only country.
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Old July 29th, 2008, 08:57 PM   #645
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Again:

http://www.skyscrapercity.com/showpo...&postcount=626
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Old July 29th, 2008, 09:08 PM   #646
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That news is a good idea, but it is only a good idea for a city already got all the stadiums and (they think) they don't need anymore. How about if Olympics host in Dubal with no stadium to start with? And they do want the stadium to stay?

We are talking about a legacy here, just stop the war government can easily pitch in 500M pounds. Yes I maybe idealistic but you guys just keep taking LOCOG's easy way out idea, nobody here from the Brit seems care about - what happen after the game. All you guys just looking at dollar sign.

Why can't LOCOG promise better sport stadium for our youth and bigger variarty of choice for next generation!!
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Old July 29th, 2008, 09:17 PM   #647
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Somebody make it stop
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Old July 29th, 2008, 09:19 PM   #648
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Because we have several large stadiums already!! Is that not easy to understand?

What on earth has Dubai got to do with anything?
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Old July 29th, 2008, 09:27 PM   #649
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Because we have several large stadiums already!! Is that not easy to understand?

What on earth has Dubai got to do with anything?
sorry i was talking about the fully demountable, relocatable stadiums
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Old July 29th, 2008, 09:33 PM   #650
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Somebody make it stop
Based on all your reply and post, I give you the title of "Zenith the King of one liner"


just a joke!
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Old July 29th, 2008, 09:40 PM   #651
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How about if Olympics host in Dubal with no stadium to start with? And they do want the stadium to stay?
Then they can build a permanent one that will stay, just like Beijing has. Each city has different needs and wants from an Olympic Games. Just because one doesn't want to keep an 80,000 seater stadium after the Games doesn't mean the next has to do the same.

London has more important things to spend money on than the upkeep of an 80,000 seater stadium that will only be used to capacity again after the Olympics probably once every ten years, no matter what sports LOCOG try and promote during its construction.

I still don't get why we're arguing this basic point. What problem is it that you have about London downsizing its stadium? You're not paying for it nor do you live in London so what's your beef about this? Are you seriously suggesting London shouldn't have bid in the first place because it doesn't intend to leave its Olympic stadium as it will be during the Games for the rest of its lifespan? That's some twisted logic.
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Old July 29th, 2008, 09:44 PM   #652
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I still don't get why we're arguing this basic point
Neither does anyone else, don't worry!
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Old July 29th, 2008, 11:03 PM   #653
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Sexas--- what do we have here?

Exhibit A -- Atlanta 1996. The stadium pictured at the top (white roof) is Atlanta-Fulton County Stadium, built in 1966 and demolished after the 1996 Olympics (it hosted the baseball events). Reason? The stadium bellow Atlanta Olympic Stadium, was downsized after the Olympics (temp. seating, sound familier?) and converted into a baseball stadium. WHY COULD NOT ATLANTA JUST HAVE TWO BIG BASEBALL STADIUMS??? DEY DIDN"T MANAGEMENT PROPER!!!!111??

before

after

Logically, the older stadium was demolished, and not-suprising for middle-America, was turned into a gigantic, garish parking lot, completel with markers of the original base ball stadium it was built upon! USA! USA!!

Um well hmmmm. First of all I grew up in Atlanta and have been to both stadiums. The Fulton County Stadium at the time of the Olympics was used for the Baseball events. Since it was thirty years old and the fact that the Olympic Stadium was to be reconfigured into a baseball stadium the county saw fit to demolish the Fulton County Stadium to make it a parking lot for Turner Field. OH! By the way Atlanta is the capitol of the state of Georgia which so happens to be located in the "South East" region of the United States. Not the middle. DERRRRRRRRR
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Last edited by Yrmom247; July 29th, 2008 at 11:18 PM.
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Old July 29th, 2008, 11:09 PM   #654
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Thank you for point it out.
No! I don't think they managing it properly, I think they can easily give the old one to the local Universities to use, who don't have stadium, but I think they build the new one over a parking lot...so they need the space back for parking lot. But the point from this is, you can do more things with a 80K stadium, it can be profitable stadium if LOCOG and the city of London managing it well, tear it down or down-sizing isn't the only option...you guys just let LOCOG go for the easy way. Look at Houston! they build the new NFL stadium right next to the old one and they both still in use.
Well the thing is the Universities and Colleges near by that actually have baseball teams already have their own fields. Georgia Tech Russ Chandler Stadium
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Old July 30th, 2008, 06:20 AM   #655
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Old July 30th, 2008, 08:07 AM   #656
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That news is a good idea, but it is only a good idea for a city already got all the stadiums and (they think) they don't need anymore. How about if Olympics host in Dubal with no stadium to start with? And they do want the stadium to stay?

We are talking about a legacy here, just stop the war government can easily pitch in 500M pounds. Yes I maybe idealistic but you guys just keep taking LOCOG's easy way out idea, nobody here from the Brit seems care about - what happen after the game. All you guys just looking at dollar sign.

Why can't LOCOG promise better sport stadium for our youth and bigger variarty of choice for next generation!!
You miss the point, Sexas. It's not about saving money - you could easily build a permanent 80,000 seat stadium for £600m - it's more the fact that London has an abundance of sporting facilities already, it doesn't need anymore!!!

Indeed, 3 of London's football teams are planning on building 55,000 + stadiums over the next decade. That will be 6 stadiums in London between 55,000 and 90,000. No other city on earth could boast such sporting facilities.

So don't worry about the legacy for sport in London, as London is surely the sporting capital of the world!
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Old July 30th, 2008, 10:00 AM   #657
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You miss the point, Sexas. It's not about saving money - you could easily build a permanent 80,000 seat stadium for £600m - it's more the fact that London has an abundance of sporting facilities already, it doesn't need anymore!!!

Indeed, 3 of London's football teams are planning on building 55,000 + stadiums over the next decade. That will be 6 stadiums in London between 55,000 and 90,000. No other city on earth could boast such sporting facilities.

So don't worry about the legacy for sport in London, as London is surely the sporting capital of the world!
Any reason why those football clubs can't use the Olypmics Stadium? Somebody already point out the club don't like the track around the stadium. but it seem like a design problem to me. And the government can always tell the football club "you better take the Olympic Stadium or no stadium at all"
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Old July 30th, 2008, 10:04 AM   #658
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Or we could build the one stadium we need - a small-mid sized athletics stadium....hang on, isn't that what's happening?
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Old July 30th, 2008, 10:15 AM   #659
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Somebody make it stop
Im enjoying it.
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Old July 30th, 2008, 10:34 AM   #660
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Me too in a strange way; it's rare you find someone here whose points are so easy to argue against.
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