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Old October 16th, 2010, 11:10 PM   #1921
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Thorpe was an ambassador for NYC's bid, but he's a world famous Olympian, so of course he's happy to see London 2012 doing well for his sport.

Incidentally, here's NYC's proposed Aquatics Centre from their 2012 bid:

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Old October 17th, 2010, 02:41 AM   #1922
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that looks awful
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Old October 17th, 2010, 03:12 AM   #1923
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Olympic Park Legacy

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Old October 17th, 2010, 11:12 PM   #1924
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Originally Posted by maXelo View Post
that could be final design inside...very close anyhows..
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Old October 18th, 2010, 08:29 AM   #1925
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That is an amazing render, very realistic.
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Old October 18th, 2010, 12:22 PM   #1926
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Originally Posted by rantanamo View Post
Do the English realize its not going to rain inside the Aquatics center or velodrome? Its funny how the roof line rides the stands the same way many of their football venues do. Definitely English.
I think its just the design. You need to take into account that the buildings shape like a stadium with a permanent roof on the top. That's why it looks like football venues. I'm sure any country with this design will follow the same construction method. I must say, these stadiums (besides the main stadium which looks like the commonwealth one in India) look good and unique. I prefer events like the olympics to be different each time. If london was to match Beijing, or if they were to 'do' a Beijing, then the London olympics will no longer be unique anymore.
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Old October 19th, 2010, 12:02 PM   #1927
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobH View Post
Thorpe was an ambassador for NYC's bid, but he's a world famous Olympian, so of course he's happy to see London 2012 doing well for his sport.

Incidentally, here's NYC's proposed Aquatics Centre from their 2012 bid:

It's just a concept. Remember London's?

Subpar building or not - that would have been one of the most spectacularly placed Olympic venues since the Barcelona aquatic centre.
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Old October 19th, 2010, 09:52 PM   #1928
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Sure, I wasn't criticising it, just posting it for interest's sake. Chicago had a very similar concept as well:

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Old October 19th, 2010, 11:47 PM   #1929
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London 2012 Olympics: England bid to host 2014 Hockey World Cup in Olympic Park


England expects: England hockey hopes to build on interest in the sport during London 2012 by hosting the 2014 World Cup at the Olympic Park

England Hockey Board (EHB) have enlisted the help of boxing promoter Frank Warren in launching a bid to bring the 2014 Hockey World Cup to London. If successful, it will be the first major event to be held at a legacy facility at the Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park following the 2012 London Olympic Games.

The bid is also supported by UK Sport and Visit London, who will inject around £1m and £500,000 respectively in to staging the finals if they are awarded to the capital.

The Lee Valley Hockey Centre would have its 3,000 seat capacity expanded to hold upwards of 10, 000 spectators for the two week event that would see the men’s and women’s World Cup hosted at the same venue for only the second time in their history.

The last time the UK hosted the men’s tournament was back in 1986 while the women’s event has never been staged here.

“Hockey is one of the ways in which we are going to turn the Olympic Park into a fantastic sporting legacy,” said Boris Johnson, the Mayor of London, who also lent his weight to the bid.

“We are always talking about regeneration of housing and parks, but it will also be a place where people want to come and play sport.

“It’s an impeccable bid. I know there are some strong rival bids from around the world, but London is very strong because we have fantastic facilities.”

EHB are looking to capitalise on an anticipated increase in interest in the sport after London 2012. All 630,000 tickets across the tournament are expected to be sold during the Games with the British squads likely to compete for medals.

“I am delighted to add my weight to this impressive bid,” said Warren. “I have promoted many great championship events here in London and this is going to be one of the most exciting.

“First of course we have to win the bid but we have a great team so let’s go out and bring the World Cups to London.”
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/oth...mpic-Park.html
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Old October 20th, 2010, 10:21 PM   #1930
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London's stadium loses it's decorative wrap - in cuts

Reuters) - Plans to surround London's Olympic stadium with an eye-catching fabric wrap have been scrapped after Wednesday's spending review by the British government but the overall Games budget has been unaffected.

"It is non essential and cannot be justified in the current financial climate," a spokesman for the Department of Culture and Sport (DCMS) said.

The 516 million pounds ($811.3 million) stadium had been designed with the wrap covering the steel girders and grey concrete seating and would have allowed for colourful images and slogans to light up the east London venue at night.

By scrapping the idea, the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA) will make a further seven million pounds in savings while another 13 million pounds will be trimmed in efficiency savings.

The ODA, the body responsible for building the Games infrastructure and venues, has already achieved 700 million pounds in savings since London's largest urban regeneration project began.

Despite the 80,000-seat stadium being stripped of its Games-time gloss, the 2012 Olympics escaped unscathed from the wide-ranging cuts in public spending announced on Wednesday.

"To deal with an unprecedented financial deficit we have been forced to make some incredibly difficult decisions," Jeremy Hunt, Secretary of State for Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport, said in a statement.

"We will deliver a safe and successful Olympics in 2012 when the eyes of the whole world will be upon us.

"By cutting bureaucracy and waste and prioritising the services valued by the public we will be able to protect our sporting and cultural core for the long term."

While the 9.3 billion Olympic budget may have been ring-fenced, London 2012 chief Sebastian Coe's desire for the 2012 to leave a lasting legacy in terms of participation levels could be undermined by cuts to general sports funding.

Sport England and UK Sport will both face a 30 percent cut in their budgets but Britain's elite athletes hoping to win medals at the Games will not be hit.

"We strongly support the safeguarding of funding to the National Governing Bodies of Olympic sports and elite athletes through a combination of exchequer and lottery funding," British Olympic Association (BOA) chairman Colin Moynihan said in a statement.

"This funding is critical to the success of Team GB at London 2012."

http://in.reuters.com/article/idINIndia-52331520101020
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Old October 21st, 2010, 01:03 AM   #1931
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Its not the worst news but still, I liked the last proposed wrap, huge shame its going.
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Old October 21st, 2010, 01:56 AM   #1932
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Sounds absolutely absurd to me!

£7 Million? I see no reason why the major International sponsors cannot jointly fund the wrap and combine a stunning feature to the Games whilst plugging their brands in between. Providing each gets the same amount of airtime - it wouldn't need to be televised (as that would go against the BBC) but throughout the games it could advertise to the crowds visiting.
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Old October 21st, 2010, 01:59 PM   #1933
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RobH View Post
Sure, I wasn't criticising it, just posting it for interest's sake. Chicago had a very similar concept as well:

Chicago's concept echoed Los Angeles heavily. I think the Chicago bid tried to evoke memories of a great American Olympics like LA 1932/1984 to somehow overshadow the more recent embarrassment of Atlanta 96.

If you look at the stadium with the simple open air swimming arena its certainly got major preWW2 Olympics undertones.

While Rio is going to be brilliant in 2016, and the best choice, Chicago 2016 would have been a superb Olympic Games. It did not deserve to come in last. Madrid and Tokyo just didn't have the same charisma.

I think the US is waiting for 2024 - and I with the right city, they'll have it in the bag. My bets are on either Chicago, New York or San Francisco, or maybe a city like Seattle or Boston.
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Old October 22nd, 2010, 07:59 PM   #1934
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Olympic Park Energy Centre powers to finish line delivering sustainable legacy for 2012

The state-of-the-art Energy Centre in the Olympic Park was unveiled today by the Olympic Delivery Authority (ODA). The building was officially opened by Mayor of London Boris Johnson, ODA Chief Executive David Higgins and Gérard Mestrallet, Chairman & CEO of GDF SUEZ who will own and operate the new facility.



The Energy Centre will help reduce the carbon emissions of the Olympic Park and deliver an early legacy of sustainable energy across the site well before the Games begin. The project is the largest energy centre scheme to be built so far in the UK.

The Energy Centre will provide an efficient low-carbon heating and cooling system across the site for the Games and for the new buildings and communities that will develop after 2012. The Energy Centre is now available to meet the heating and cooling requirements of venues and buildings across the Olympic Park.

Boris Johnson, Mayor of London said: 'It is an environmental imperative that we harness the delivery of 2012 Games to raise new standards of sustainability. Not only will this leverage in new skills and job opportunities for Londoners, but also help the transition towards a low carbon economy. It is a fantastic achievement that the Olympic Park will be powered locally. Not only will it generate electricity but the heat from that process will also be used to heat and cool buildings providing a valuable wider legacy for the vibrant new metropolitan quarter we are creating in east London. We want to encourage more energy centres such as this one through the London Green Fund, which will offer loans for innovative infrastructure projects.'

ODA Chief Executive David Higgins said: 'The opening of the Energy Centre is a significant milestone for the Olympic Park and demonstrates the sustainability features that underpin this project. The Energy Centre will deliver essential services throughout the Olympic Park well before the Games begin and ensure a lasting legacy of green power for generations to come. The delivery of this facility is a considerable achievement and sets a model for future urban regeneration schemes'

Andrew Altman, Chief Executive of the Olympic Park Legacy Company, said: 'The Energy Centre will be a core part of our long-term sustainability aims, meeting all future energy needs of the Olympic Park including the five new neighbourhoods that will be developed. Not only will it be more energy efficient by eliminating the need for boilers in each home, but it has the capacity to supply the areas surrounding the Park and, in turn, leave an even bigger legacy for east London.'

The facility will provide an efficient low-carbon heating and cooling system across the site for the Games and for the new buildings and communities that will develop after 2012, contributing towards the ODA’s overall target to reduce carbon emissions by 50% across the Olympic Park.

The Energy Centre will include a gas-fired Combined Cooling Heat & Power (CCHP) plant to capture the heat generated by electricity production. It will also include biomass-fired boilers using sustainable biomass fuels (woodchip) to generate heat and deliver low carbon energy. Cooling will be provided through a combination of electric, ammonia based chillers and absorption chillers which are driven by heat recovered from plant in the Energy Centre.

The Energy Centre has a flexible modular design, meaning that further capacity and new technology can be added as the area is developed after the Games and demand increases.

Emphasis has been put on the architectural designs of the energy centre to ensure it fits in with the design of the wider Olympic Park. The energy centre has been designed by John McAslan & Partners and reflects the Victorian heritage of the Olympic Park site as well as drawing inspiration from iconic London power stations such as Tate Modern (the former Bankside power station) and Battersea power station. Part of the utilities infrastructure will be housed within an existing Edwardian building which is being retained and renovated and will include space for a visitors’ centre to be added in the future.

The Energy Centre has been also been designed to be part of a wider ‘family’ of utility buildings on the Olympic Park, to join the electricity substation and sewer pumping station – these main utility buildings have all been designed to be ‘grounded in the earth’ with a solidity to give them a separate identity to the main sporting venues in the Olympic Park which are seen as lightweight and floating out of the ground.

Energy Centre fact file:

* The Energy Centre has been designed, financed and built by Cofely, subsidiary of GDF SUEZ, together with approximately 16km of community energy networks. It will be operated by Cofely, the energy services company of GDF SUEZ, for 40 years
* An initial capacity of 46.5 MW of heating and 16 MW of cooling
* The Energy Centre building is 45m tall at its highest point
* Equipment in the building includes five cooling towers, and two hot water boilers each weighing around 60 tons
* The Energy Centre will provide heating and cooling through 16km of Community Energy Networks across the Olympic Park
* An early legacy of sustainable and essential energy services
* The facility will use zero carbon renewable energy sources such as biomass
* The CCHP system has been designed to use recycled wastewater to cool the Energy Centre
* The community energy networks across the Olympic Park have been designed to operate at low temperatures, minimising energy losses
* Heating will be affordable, with mechanisms in place to ensure that supply costs less to end-users than traditional means
* A 2nd Energy Centre is being built in Stratford City to supply the new retail and commercial development
* The flexible modular building design avoids overcapacity in first phase of development but allows future technologies to be incorporated in the building as they are developed and as demand grows after 2012

http://www.london2012.com/press/medi...ne-deliver.php
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Old October 24th, 2010, 04:08 AM   #1935
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Why the Olympic Park building site has become London's hot new tourist attraction

Building sites are not generally places that attract day-trippers but then the 2012 Olympic Park has more potential than your average development. Indeed, so popular is the work in progress proving that around 110,000 curious visitors have already descended on London's east end to have a nose around. On a sunny autumn afternoon, I joined a few of them - and some 10,000 men in hard hats - at what is turning out to be the capital's unlikely new tourist attraction...



Pulling into Pudding Mill Station on the Docklands Light Railway, it is hard to avoid the Olympic Park, the train practically hovers right over the site. The raised line that leads from central London out to Stratford in the east is the kind of route a tourist bus would charge a fortune to ride, but for the price of a commuter train ticket you can fly right by the stadium and venues in all their glory. However, I have been told I can enjoy an even better view with a quick walk to the foot and cycle path known as the Greenway - a once-neglected passage considered far too dangerous to venture down but now revamped thanks to a wave of the Olympic wand.

The four-and-a-half mile route cuts across east London and borders the building site is currently Olympic Park, offering some great vantage points from which to see the new structures come to life. Known as the View Tube, the main lookout has been made all the more pleasant by a community-run cafe located in a bright green building made from recycled shipping containers - these are to be known as the 'Green Games' after all.





It is not unusual to see groups on Blue Badge guided tours around the outskirts of the site making a quick pitstop en masse at the cafe to enjoy bargain bacon butties and homemade cakes. Nor is it surprising to see a gaggle of schoolchildren being shepherded into the View Tube building and the classroom upstairs which has been designed to host and inspire younger visitors.

I'm surprised that even on a weekday there seems to be a steady trickle of locals and visitors dropping in to enjoy a coffee with a view - I even spotted the odd business meeting taking place. For the adventurous who want to explore further afield, bikes are for hire for a wallet-friendly £5, enabling you to take yourself off around the circumference of the Park and down the length of The Greenway with its unparalleled views of London's City skyline.



But if you really want a dose of Olympic fever, there is no better way to join the excitement than with a free bus tour inside the hallowed fences of the Park. The trips take place daily but are so popular that you have to book three to four months in advance (book now if you want to see it in spring) to even have a hope of setting foot inside London's ultimate sports venue before 2012.

But it is well worth the long waiting list and stringent security checks. As I pass by the sweeping roof of the velodrome - everybody's favourite building - and the wibbly, tent-like basketball arena, it is fascinating to hear the thought process behind each decision and the unusual history of the area. How poetic that the Park is being built on what was once a dumping ground for WW2 rubble and the site where the running track from the 1948 Olympics is buried.

While I can't get out of the vehicle for safety reasons ('Olympic rubble crushes visitor' is not among the headlines the organisers want to create), I'm as close to the action as it is possible to be ahead of the official opening. And there is something truly exciting about seeing the Park mid-transformation - it feels like a VIP-style sneak peek behind the scenes with giant steel rods rushed past us and bulky items lurking mysteriously under tarpaulins.



A surprising number of structures look almost finished from the outside. Some are temporary and others are purposefully designed so that they can be converted into something else once the games are over. The enormous media centre has had cooling systems built on the outside, so that once the TV cameras have gone, they can be removed easily and the building put to good use in other ways. The Aquatics Centre and Stadium have extra seating that can be detached to make them smaller and the Basketball Arena can be taken down and set up in another part of the UK that needs a sports venue.

Three waterways criss-cross the Park and the banks - currently covered in orange fencing to protect new plants - are being designed to create picnic spots for the visiting masses. And organisers have worked with the University of Sheffield to choose just the right wildflowers for the meadow outside the Stadium so they bloom an appropriate gold colour in the month of August.



But it's not just the pretty touches that make the site so special, the idea of creating a legacy - so intrinsic to London's successful bid - has come to life in a myriad of unusual ways. As well as the 4,000 trees being planted, a 2,000-pupil school is also being built just behind the Olympic Village so that when it is turned into a residential area in 2013 there is already a community feel.

The soil of the once-industrial site has been removed and cleaned before being built on, to rid it of the poisonous asbestos and chemicals that had seeped into the ground and an apprentice centre has been set up to train young people in the building and construction trade. Seeing the Park now, there is a real sense of seeing the power of regeneration in action. Visitors leave walking that little bit taller, that little bit prouder, and local children are full of bubbling, excited chatter. As for me, I'm heading straight home to apply for 2012 tickets online. There's no way I'm missing out on this party.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/ar...ttraction.html
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Old October 25th, 2010, 02:44 AM   #1936
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What will east London look like after the athletes leave?

Stadiums rise from the building sites of Stratford and another 2,000 homes are planned to replace the Olympic media centre after 2012

There's little more maddening than wandering around an obsolete and decaying Olympic complex, which, after huge investment and a brief moment of glory, is rotting away. From Athens to Atlanta they stand, chronically underused and deathly silent, a testament to overambitious and short-sighted planning.


In Britain, with the 2012 Olympic Games drawing nearer and building work gathering pace, the Government and public alike are anxious that the 500-acre complex being constructed at Stratford in east London should deliver a profound and lasting legacy for the area. Especially when in a faltering economy the expected cost of the Games has risen from £2.4bn five years ago to around £9.3bn now.

Last week the Olympic Park Legacy Company (OPLC), the organistaion set the challenge of turning one of the country's most deprived areas into a sustainable and thriving neighbourhood, and home to thousands of new homes, called for expressions of interest in the massive broadcast and press centres currently under construction .

While the media centres, designed to house 20,000 journalists, photographers and broadcasters during the Games, are not themselves suitable for housing – there has been early interest from a range of sectors including creative, retail, education, sports, culture and office use – it is envisaged that they will be a vibrant hub of activity, the centre of a new neighbourhood that will include lots of new housing – surrounded by the park's 80,000-seater stadium, aquatic centre, velopark and indoor arena.

"The broadcast and press centres offer an unprecedented opportunity to create a new employment hub in Hackney Wick," says Jules Pipe, the elected Mayor of Hackney. "They will have world-class communications infrastructure and will be served by excellent new transport links."

However, a report last month by the London Assembly disagreed, noting that the media centre will be poorly served by transport.

Andrew Altman, chief executive of the OPLC, remains optimistic, however: "We hope to have around 2,000 new homes built around the broadcast and press centres," he says. "We see the Olympic Park as having distinct neighbourhoods, and this one will have green spaces, a public plaza, great connectivity, with bridges linking with Hackney Wick, perhaps some retail."

And, overall, the region's transport will be greatly improved. The Docklands Light Railway will be extended, and the Jubilee Line will increase capacity, while Stratford regional station will be equipped to cope with three times the current level of passengers. With the Eurostar and Crossrail connecting with Stratford in time, and City airport in the vicinity, the transport network will be fantastic, and invariably a huge influence on driving prices upwards.

At present the media centre is a huge building site and doesn't look too inspiring, but it is not difficult to imagine how it could be transformed into an attractive, thriving new neighbourhood once the Games have ended. Framed on two sides by pretty waterways, with Hackney Marshes to the immediate north and more open space to the east, and with the extensive facilities in the area – including the £1.45 billion Westfield Stratford City, which will be Europe's biggest shopping centre – no doubt people will be queuing up to live and work here if all goes to plan.

Details of housing on the Olympic Park – which is set to consist of at least 10,000 homes in all, to be constructed in the two decades following the Games – is still sketchy. Plans are afoot for up to 2,818 homes to be created, with 1,379 of these affordable, from the 17,800-person capacity Athletes' Village to be used by athletes and officials during the Games.

It will feature an education academy for 1,800 students, community and healthcare facilities, and parks, public squares, tree-lined streets and communal gardens. Residents will move in during 2013, at which time the development will be extended to include further homes, a health centre and community centre.

The regeneration is to be carefully integrated with existing communities, creating huge new employment opportunities. Indeed, at present around 10,000 people are working at the site.

Stratford City, where the Westfield retail park is set to open next spring, is pencilled to accommodate 16,400 homes on completion. Ikea has also bought a site by the Olympic Park, with development potential for up to 1,500 homes.

As well as Stratford itself, there are new homes planned in Bromley-by-Bow, Hackney Wick, Canning Town and Leyton. It is difficult to ascertain as yet exactly how much the Olympic Park is influencing the local housing market, however. Analysis of Land Registry data by Lloyds TSB in July revealed that house prices in east London have risen by 26 per cent (compared to 20 per cent nationally) since the capital was granted the right to host the Games in 2005. Some neighbourhoods have enjoyed particularly high increases, such as Homerton rising by 69 per cent, compared to the Greater London average of 36 per cent. Yet in total just four out of the 14 Olympic postal districts have seen house prices rise by more than the London average. Stratford, where the Olympic Stadium is located, saw only a 3 per cent increase in average prices, lower than any of the other Olympic postal districts.

And there have been other influences at play to help explain price rises, including the transport improvements and gentrification of areas such as Hoxton and Shoreditch. The financial crisis and property crash would have complicated the picture further.

Agents are noticing considerable interest from Chinese investors, who witnessed the Olympic effect on property prices in Beijing. Many believe that buying now, with the worst of the financial crisis over, in order to sell just before the Games, before a new swathe of properties enter the market after the Games, is a possible strategy.

Potential investors should be aware that there is always a danger of east London being swamped by new housing stock. Forty two per cent of Greater London's homes under construction are in east London, and more than half of those with planning permission but awaiting construction are there also.

"There are a number of developments in Stratford and Hackney itself that are being built independently," says Daren Haysom, sales manager of the Islington branch of agents Foxtons. "They include the striking Athena Towers located on Stratford high street with magnificent views over the Olympic Stadium and just nearby is St Andrews in Bromley By Bow."

Athena, an entirely private development, will tower 28 storeys above the ground and provide far-reaching views across London and the Olympic Park. Apartments are not currently available, but details of prices, specifications and availabilty are expected around mid-November.

Knight Frank is currently marketing 64 one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments at the architecturally bold Lett Road development near the park, with prices ranging from £235,000 to £337,500. Around half have already been sold since launching in April.

Affordable homes developer One Housing Group's Velocity development on Stratford high street is also generating considerable interest. The one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments will be available to those eligible through schemes including the Government's New Build Homebuy scheme. The properties will be released for sale tomorrow.

Close to Bow Church, at Genesis Homes' Fairfield Quarter affordable homes development, a 25 per cent share price for the one-bedroom apartments ranges from £41,000 to £56,750, based on full-market price ranges from £164,000 to £227,000.

"With the Olympic Games fast approaching there has been a complete makeover and remodelling of Stratford and Hackney – areas positioned right above Canary Wharf, one of the most valuable financial districts in the world," says Haysom. "Essentially, it's the redevelopment of a section of a capital city with an existing and strong beating heart. Once the Olympics is complete it will become important to focus on engaging the Olympic Park with its neighbouring areas.

"East London has seen a huge uplift in demand and prices this year, with continued redevelopment, new transport links and a massive influx of fashion-setting inhabitants. Despite this, property prices still remain well below central London average values and are therefore a great investment for the future."

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-st...e-2094455.html
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Old October 25th, 2010, 01:19 PM   #1937
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Firework displays could be ditched from ceremonies The International Olympic Committee is to consider whether to ditch traditional fireworks displays at the opening and closing ceremonies at the London 2012 Games on environmental grounds.

By Jacquelin Magnay
Published: 8:33PM BST 24 Oct 2010
Explosive: the firework display at the opening ceremony of the 2008 Beijing Olympics could be lastPhoto: AFP The Sri Lankan National Olympic Committee president Hemasiri Fernando said the extensive use of fireworks used during the ceremonies caused a potential polluting effect. The IOC has now promised to put the matter to its environmental committee.
“We all have the responsibility to protect this earth and the fireworks have a tremendous effect on the environment,” Fernando said.

IOC president Jacques Rogge said he was taking the issue seriously but wanted more information about the carbon footprint of previous displays.
However, Lord Coe, chairman of the London 2012 organising committee, said he preferred to concentrate on the sporting side of the Games.
“We have a creative team who are looking at things and putting stuff together and, while I am keen to observe the views of all 205 national olympic committees, at this moment my focus is delivering the 26 sports and I don’t have a fireworks policy,” he said.

Back in 1988 there was an outcry about the tradition of releasing doves to symbolise peace and the Olympic truce at the Games following the death of a flock of doves when the Seoul cauldron was lit.
Rogge added: “The doves went in the cauldron and tens of doves were burned alive and there was a lot of emotion from the world wildlife fund and animal protection and the IOC decided no doves would be released any more."
Fireworks comprised an extraordinary part of the spectacular opening ceremony of the Beijing Olympics, although organisers came under fire for “faking” the broadcast footage of the colourful sequence with an overlay of pre-filmed firework explosions.
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Old October 25th, 2010, 05:43 PM   #1938
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London Olympics 2012 on Track, Claims Andy Hunt

Andy Hunt, the Chief Executive for British Olympics Association has claimed that the preparations for London Olympics 2012 were on schedule and he expected to deliver a fantastic games event to the spectators around the globe.

Talking to the media personnel on Tuesday, the chief executive said that the government’s decision to exclude Olympics games spending from major cuts to reduce the country’s deficit was commendable.

Reportedly, there has been a budget allocation of 9.3 billion pounds for London Olympics 2012 event. Out of this huge amount, 7.3 billion pounds would be spent on regeneration of east London.

While addressing the press after a meeting of National Olympics Organizations in Acapulco Hunt expressed that cutting off the Olympics’ budget would have been a crazy step. He was of the view that allocation of two billion pounds for staging the sport event was rather appropriate; with such huge sums of money, the games could turn out to be fantastic.

Today Mr. Seb Coe, the chairman for London Organizing committee is expected to present a progress report before the Association of National Olympics Committee. The report would encapsulate all the details of the works which have been duly completed and the proposed schedule for the pending tasks.

Pondering upon the success for convincing the government to not to cut the budget for the London Olympics, Andy Hunt said that they had to lodge a lot of lobbying efforts for pursuing the authorities. However, he also admitted that for the government too, things were quite difficult to handle on economic fronts. “In the toughest economic crunch of the times if the authorities have the nerve to retain spending upon the sports that must be welcomed with open hearts,” said the chief executive.

Talking about the preparations work, Hunt said that regeneration of a large part of eastern side of the London city would help them carve an outstanding legacy and would transform the eastern side of the city to admirable standards.

Hunt hoped that the Olympic stadium would be able to retain the running tracks after the games would be over, however he also admitted that the final decision had to be taken by the Olympic Park Legacy Company.

While bidding for the Olympics games, the officials at London had promised to keep athletics as a part of long run future of the stadium, it is expected that after the 2012 games would be over, most probably they would keep their promise.

A major improvement in this regards was witnessed when two of the Premier League Football teams expressed their interest in moving to the Olympic stadium, however a considerable hindrance on the way forward was the proposal from London Club West Ham United to keep the running track. A few months back West Ham had submitted a joint offer with local government of Newham east London in which they had requested to retain the track of the stadium for 537 million pounds. The request was also backed by the governing body of the UK athletics.

Another bid had been submitted by a rival London club known as Tottenham as a joint venture in collaboration with American entertainment and sport giant AEG. However, they do not have any plans to keep the athletics track intact.

Commenting upon the situation, Hunt said that he felt encouraged after several good bids for stadium had been submitted. He also added that provision of a world class athletics track in the stadium was at the top of their agenda and failing to do so would be equally disappointing for them.

On the other side, David Campbell the chief executive for AEG Europe told the media correspondents that he believed there were two other credible bids; however, the total number of bids could rise to 30 for the remarkably large stadium situated on a huge 560 acres of site in the most rundown part of the capital of Britain.
http://blogs.bettor.com/London-Olymp...dy-Hunt-a36166
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Old October 27th, 2010, 08:16 PM   #1939
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London 2012 Olympics: IOC president Jacques Rogge praises Games organisers


Impressed: IOC president Jacques Rogge has congratulated the London 2012 organisers

International Olympic Committee president Jacques Rogge is so impressed with the preparations for the London 2012 Olympic Games he has predicted that they will be ''a great success''.

Dr Rogge was so confident in the professionalism of the Games organisers that he publicly praised them following a three day IOC executive board meeting.

He noted the next challenges for the organisers were the same as for every Games cycle - moving from the construction phase to the operational phase and learning from the test event period.

''London is going extremely well, ''he said. ''This is really a very good preparation. Test events are a very good indicator.'' Dr Rogge said Britain was the country that invented modern sport and that pedigree will underpin the strength of the British team at their home games.

''They are very strong in sport, the British Olympic Association at the last two games was outstanding and I have every confidence in their success,'' he said.

Meanwhile Dr Rogge has faciliated discussions between Israel and Palestine here in Acapulco after a recent goodwill tour to the Middle East and the two countries will meet in Lausanne early next year to discuss sporting issues.

''Palestinian athletes have trouble coming to Palestine, travelling back from international competions which is sometimes a lengthy process. The two (countries met here ) together, agreed on inventory of issues that have to be solved, an inventory of bilaterial support and exchanges that could be carried out,'' Dr Rogge said.

He also confirmed that Haiti would be the next recipient of the Olympic Youth Development Centre under its Sports for Hope initiative.

A meeting is being organised for early next year to bring together government, sport and regulatory bodies like Interpol to see how a legislation can help sports in battling illegal and corrupt betting practices.

Dr Rogge said the IOC had already worked with cricket, equestrian and tennis as the sports most affected by irregular betting and had expanded the involvment of a monitoring company to embrace other international sports competitions and international federations.
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/oth...rganisers.html
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Old October 28th, 2010, 01:21 AM   #1940
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