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Old February 7th, 2012, 06:22 PM   #3201
Satyricon84
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Superstrada Cassino-Sora-Avezzano SS509/SS690












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Old February 7th, 2012, 08:40 PM   #3202
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i drove that road few years ago (in the middle of summer) and wondered how it looks like in winter
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Old February 7th, 2012, 09:08 PM   #3203
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
Weird language order: French on the 2nd row (France around 600km) and German on the last (Austrian border close).
Now we should also add Slovenian, Croatian, Czech and Hungarian but probably this sign was made when the Iron Curtain still existed and there weren't many people from those close countries like today.
There was some traffic from Yugoslavia, and there were (and still are) some signs in Serbo-Croatian (but not Slovenian).
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Old February 7th, 2012, 09:26 PM   #3204
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There was some traffic from Yugoslavia, and there were (and still are) some signs in Serbo-Croatian (but not Slovenian).
This is at Gonars Nord on A4. That sign tell not to buy stuff from illegal salesmen.
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Old February 8th, 2012, 12:59 AM   #3205
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somebody got an explanation why there was f** 7°C near Gemona?? (both directions) basically Gorizia - Udine was around 2°, and the climat changes in Pontebba from mediteranean to alpine.

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map1 par d.hofburg, sur Flickr
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Old February 8th, 2012, 01:03 AM   #3206
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4 lanes viaduct and 3 lanes tunnel on A23:

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07.02.2012 010 par d.hofburg, sur Flickr

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07.02.2012 009 par d.hofburg, sur Flickr
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Old February 8th, 2012, 01:35 AM   #3207
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somebody got an explanation why there was f** 7°C near Gemona?? (both directions) basically Gorizia - Udine was around 2°, and the climat changes in Pontebba from mediteranean to alpine.

image hosted on flickr

map1 par d.hofburg, sur Flickr
You got those figures by Internet forecasts or with your car's thermometer? Maybe Gemona is warmer because it's in a valley between mountains, but I think it's weird that they had 7°C while it was about 2-3°C south of Udine only a bit higher than the sealevel.
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Old February 8th, 2012, 01:38 AM   #3208
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car's thermometer. it's weird indeed, and even weirder I got the same thing when I was driving back, in the evening was 6°C near Gemona again. is maybe some industry near the motorway?
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Old February 8th, 2012, 02:00 AM   #3209
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car's thermometer. it's weird indeed, and even weirder I got the same thing when I was driving back, in the evening was 6°C near Gemona again. is maybe some industry near the motorway?
There is a steel plant in Osoppo, near Gemona; you can see the smoke from the motorway (on the left travelling northbound). But I don't think that it would interfere too much with climate, more likely hills protect this area from cold winds that come from the east (the famous Trieste's bora).
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Old February 8th, 2012, 07:13 AM   #3210
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italystf View Post
There is a steel plant in Osoppo, near Gemona; you can see the smoke from the motorway (on the left travelling northbound). But I don't think that it would interfere too much with climate, more likely hills protect this area from cold winds that come from the east (the famous Trieste's bora).
This kind of plant can increase temperature for about 1-2 degrees I think.
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Old February 9th, 2012, 01:04 AM   #3211
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Quote:
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Do you remember if those pics were taken northbound or southbound? In the first case is Fella rest area, in the second Campiolo rest area.

Weird language order: French on the 2nd row (France around 600km) and German on the last (Austrian border close).
Now we should also add Slovenian, Croatian, Czech and Hungarian but probably this sign was made when the Iron Curtain still existed and there weren't many people from those close countries like today.
French, English, German and Italian are almost anywhere in Italy when you have to put a multi-language panel bc these are the most important languages in the EU, regardless how far the small eastern european countries are

Slovenian, Croatian, Czeck and Hungarian are fairly irrelevant in this sense, as most people are supposed to know some basics of at least one of the 4 languages above if they are travelling in Italy.

Probably what is missing is Spanish...
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Old February 9th, 2012, 01:40 AM   #3212
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Probably what is missing is Spanish...
And Friulan (although almost all of them understand Italian).

Last edited by Verso; February 9th, 2012 at 01:45 AM.
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Old February 9th, 2012, 01:50 AM   #3213
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Understand? Virtually all of them are native speakers of Italian as well.
Last thing we need is a regional language mumbo-jumbo.
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Old February 9th, 2012, 12:39 PM   #3214
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And Friulan (although almost all of them understand Italian).
I'm from Friuli but I'm against those bilingual signs they put everywhere in Friuli. They are very annoying to tourists (expecially foreigners). Reading a directional sign with 5-6 town names while driving on an unknown road may be difficult and confusing, imagine if those town are written also in the local language. By the way, Friulan isn't the same all over the region. Signs are written everywhere in Udine's Friulan, so local names are often differents from those really used for example in Pordenone, Tolmezzo or Latisana. Nobody needs those signs, even Friulans feel more comfortable reading Italian names. Changing all signs was IMHO a huge waste of money. This is in contrast with the process of globalization and EU integration that is happening nowadays.





autostrade - tangjenziàl




In some villages of the provinces of UD, GO and TS there is the I-SLO bilinguism:








Last edited by italystf; February 9th, 2012 at 12:44 PM.
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Old February 9th, 2012, 12:42 PM   #3215
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I hate when they put more than one language on a sign, but the town's name is the same in both languages, so they write it twice
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Old February 9th, 2012, 12:59 PM   #3216
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I hate when they put more than one language on a sign, but the town's name is the same in both languages, so they write it twice
It depens on the situation. There are areas with 2 official languages such Italian and German in Alto Adige, Italian and French in Aoste Valley, Italian and Slovenian in some Trieste suburbs, French and German in Alsace, French and Dutch in Bruxelles, English and French in some parts of Canada, ecc... In those place is right use bilingual signs since both languages are spoken there by different people.
But local languages are a different thing. They aren't used anymore as primary language by anyone; everybody known the national language and they aren't usually spoken for example at school or at official ceremonies. In Italy Friulan, Sardinian, Occitan (spoken in some parts of Piedmont) and Ladin (Trentino - Alto Adige) are officially recognized as minority languages, so bilingual signs are allowed. But practically they're like other Italian dialect such Venetian, Lombardian, Tuscanian, Roman, Sicilian, ecc... spoken in families but everybody from those regions also knows Italian and speak it in more formal occasions. So, I think such kind of bilingual signs are useless and only confusing.
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Old February 9th, 2012, 01:40 PM   #3217
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Preservation of our heritage. It's important to protect those minority languages. To be in UE doesn't mean to lose own identity and diversity
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Old February 9th, 2012, 01:42 PM   #3218
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Quote:
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Preservation of our heritage. It's important to protect those minority languages. To be in UE doesn't mean to lose own identity and diversity
Making road signs confusing doesn't seem the right way to preserve your heritage...
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Old February 9th, 2012, 01:44 PM   #3219
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Making road signs confusing doesn't seem the right way to preserve your heritage...
Confusing is not the roadsign in two languages, rather is confusing the roadsign in itself
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Old February 9th, 2012, 01:51 PM   #3220
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Quote:
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Preservation of our heritage. It's important to protect those minority languages. To be in UE doesn't mean to lose own identity and diversity
There are more serious ways to protect our heritage. If you really want bilingual signs, at least limit bilinguism to entry/exit town signs and street name signs but avoid bilingual directional signs that need to be easily readable by anyone while driving fast.
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