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Old September 24th, 2008, 12:10 AM   #61
Matthias Offodile
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The people of French Guiana would never accept that. They are already upset about making up only 50% of French Guiana's population (the rest is made up of Brazilian, Surinamese and Haitian immigrants, as well as Metropolitan Frenchmen). They fear that their original French Guianese creole culture is being swamped and erased by all these newcomers (just imagine a country with 50% of the population being immigrants), so they would completely oppose the arrival of 3 million people from Metropolitan France which would turn them into a tiny minority.

Besides, France is not a dictatorship, so it's not like you can snap your fingers and have 3 million Metropolitan French people move to French Guiana. Of all the Europeans, the French have always been the least inclined to migrate. Even a paradise like New Caledonia has attracted only 50,000 French people since the 19th century. If French people were migrants at heart, North America today would be French speaking, and French would be the world language today instead of English because in the 18th century there were 4 times more inhabitants in France than in England. England, with 4 times less inhabitants than France, sent 230,000 settlers to North America in the 17th and 18th centuries (not even counting the Scots, Scot-Irish and Irish) whereas France sent only 30,000 settlers, two-third of whom returned to France (while extremely few English settlers returned to England), thus leaving only 10,000 French people in North America. The 7 million French Canadians and the nearly 10 million US citizens with French, French Canadian and Cajun ancestry are all descended from these 10,000 French settlers who remained in North America.

Even if the French government disregarded the uneasiness of French Guianese creoles becoming a tiny minority in their homeland, and suddenly promoted a large scale immigration program to French Guiana, I doubt they would attract more than a few tens of thousands of Metropolitan French people.
why do you leave out Africa? There are many French people that flocked to Africa south of Sahara....there was a large chunk that arrived after 1960. The figure sky-rockettted to 350 000 till 1980´s...the number has gone down drastically since then but there are still relatively large French commnunities in certain African countries, even second and third generation!!!

Moreover, do not forget the Magreb, there are many Franch people in Tunisia and Marocco and I don´t mean the tourists.

Btw, lovely pics!

Is there any slight chance of seeing an independent Quebec in the future?
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Old September 24th, 2008, 12:11 AM   #62
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The people of French Guiana would never accept that. They are already upset about making up only 50% of French Guiana's population (the rest is made up of Brazilian, Surinamese and Haitian immigrants, as well as Metropolitan Frenchmen). They fear that their original French Guianese creole culture is being swamped and erased by all these newcomers (just imagine a country with 50% of the population being immigrants), so they would completely oppose the arrival of 3 million people from Metropolitan France which would turn them into a tiny minority.

Besides, France is not a dictatorship, so it's not like you can snap your fingers and have 3 million Metropolitan French people move to French Guiana. Of all the Europeans, the French have always been the least inclined to migrate. Even a paradise like New Caledonia has attracted only 50,000 French people since the 19th century. If French people were migrants at heart, North America today would be French speaking, and French would be the world language today instead of English because in the 18th century there were 4 times more inhabitants in France than in England. England, with 4 times less inhabitants than France, sent 230,000 settlers to North America in the 17th and 18th centuries (not even counting the Scots, Scot-Irish and Irish) whereas France sent only 30,000 settlers, two-third of whom returned to France (while extremely few English settlers returned to England), thus leaving only 10,000 French people in North America. The 7 million French Canadians and the nearly 10 million US citizens with French, French Canadian and Cajun ancestry are all descended from these 10,000 French settlers who remained in North America.

Even if the French government disregarded the uneasiness of French Guianese creoles becoming a tiny minority in their homeland, and suddenly promoted a large scale immigration program to French Guiana, I doubt they would attract more than a few tens of thousands of Metropolitan French people.
why do you leave out Africa? There are many French people that flocked to Africa south of Sahara....there was a large chunk that arrived after 1960. The figure sky-rockettted to 350 000 till 1980´s...the number has gone down drastically since then but there are still relatively large French commnunities in certain African countries, even second and third generation!!!

Moreover, do not forget the Magreb, there are many Franch people in Tunisia and Marocco and I don´t mean the tourists.

Btw, lovely pics!

Is there any slight chance of seeing an independent Quebec in the future?
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Old September 24th, 2008, 12:27 AM   #63
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hope you don´t mind if I add some Nouméa pictures

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Old September 26th, 2008, 12:52 PM   #64
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Thank you Matthias for those pics, Nouméa seems to be a nice place to live.
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Old September 26th, 2008, 01:21 PM   #65
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Some pics of FORT-DE-FRANCE and suburbs (MARTINIQUE, French caribbean)


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Old December 12th, 2008, 09:47 PM   #66
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Quote:
Originally Posted by r32_gts View Post
Have you been to Noumea? It doesn't have a Western European living standard. It's still a nice place though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brisavoine View Post
In 2004, according to official figures from the New Caledonia statistics institute, the GDP per capita of New Caledonia was 25,352 US dollars. Greater Nouméa account for 63% of New Caledonia's population, and GDP per capita there is significantly higher than in the rest of New Caledonia, so I would say the GDP per capita in Greater Noumea is possibly about 29,000 US dollars whereas the GDP per capita of the rest of New Caledonia is about 19,000 US dollars (just an educated guess).
I've found some very interesting statistics in a study just published by the French statistical office (link below). These statistics confirm what I was guessing in a previous post (above). The French statistical office calculated GDP per capita for each province of New Caledonia, and also for Greater Nouméa. As far as I know, this is the first time that this was ever done. They found (all details in the study linked to below) that in 2004 the GDP per capita in Greater Nouméa was about 18% higher than the New Caledonian average. If we suppose that it was the same in 2007 (18% higher in Greater Nouméa than in New Caledonia as a whole), that means the GDP per capita in Greater Nouméa was 42,990 US dollars in 2007 at market exchange rates (compared to 36,376 US dollars for New Caledonia as a whole).

These are very high GDP per capita figures, and in fact with 42,990 US dollars the GDP per capita of Greater Nouméa is higher than the GDP per capita of Metropolitan France (the European part of France), which was "only" 41,311 US dollars in 2007.

However, these are GDP per capita figures converted at market exchange rates. If they were converted at purchasing power parity (PPP), they would be significantly lower due to the very high cost of life in New Caledonia, since most products have to be imported from far away. In the same study the French statistical office tried to calculate the PPP GDP per capita of New Caledonia. As far as I know, this is also the first time this was ever attempted (neither the IMF nor the World Bank make any PPP calculations for New Caledonia). The French statistical office tried a PPP calculation for New Calculation for the year 2005, a very rough calculation not as accurate as those carried out by the IMF and the World Bank, but still it gives an idea. If I apply their PPP conversion to the year 2007 (i.e. supposing that the PPP value of a Pacific franc in US dollars in 2007 is the same as the PPP value in 2005 calculated by INSEE), then I find that in 2007 the PPP GDP per capita of Greater Nouméa was 25,750 US dollars (down from 42,990 US dollars at market exchange rates, which reflects the very high cost of life in New Caledonia). This is a PPP GDP per capita that is very close to the PPP GDP per capita of New Zealand. As for New Caledonia as a whole, I find a PPP GDP per capita of 21,790 US dollars, which is the same as the PPP GDP per capita of Portugal. For comparison, the PPP GDP per capita of Metropolitan France in 2007 was 33,509 US dollars.

So there you have it. The PPP GDP per capita in Greater Nouméa is about the same as in New Zealand, and bear in mind that it doesn't even include the pensions of the many French retirees living in Nouméa who receive an income through their French pensions but sink the GDP per capita figures since they don't work (same as happens on the French Riviera or in Florida, but on a smaller scale of course).

These figures I found in a very detailed study just published this week. The study is about the New Caledonian economy, the reasons for the economic boom in New Caledonia, the socio-economic conditions of the territory, and the prospects for the New Caledonian economy in the future. It contains a wealth of information, figures, tables, graphs. I can only recommend it if you can read French. I learned some very interesting things, such as how the Melanesian Kanaks are fast catching up with the European New Caledonians: in the past 20 years, the fertility rates in the Northern Province as well as in the Loyalty Islands, where the majority of the Kanaks live, have dropped dramatically, being now almost the same as in Greater Nouméa, where the majority of the Whites live. Standards of living have also dramatically increased in 20 years in the Northern Province and the Loyalty Islands (the number of houses equiped with bathrooms and toilets for example, the ownership of cars, etc.). Inequalities still remain high, however, much higher than in Metropolitan France, but are diminishing year after year. Life expectancy in the Northern Province and the Loyalty Islands has also greatly increased, now reaching almost the life expectancy in Greater Nouméa.

Here is the link to the study: The Challenges of New Caledonia's Growth

With the expansion of the nickel industry, the economic boom in New Caledonia is set to continue in the coming years, despite the current global crisis (bar a total collapse of economic growth in East Asia). This attracts many immigrants to New Caledonia (in particular from Metropolitan France), and explains the big urban growth in Greater Nouméa, with many urban developments currently going on. I'll post info as it comes.

Last edited by brisavoine; December 18th, 2008 at 02:22 AM.
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Old December 18th, 2008, 02:16 AM   #67
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News just in: Nicolas Sarkozy announced tonight that a referendum will be held in the overseas collectivity of Mayotte on March 29, 2009 to decide whether Mayotte will become a full-fledged département of France. Most likely the majority of the Mayotte people will vote in favor of becoming a French département. In that case, Mayotte (200,000 inhabitants and growing) will become the 101st French département in 2011 (the first département created since 1964), and will therefore also enter the European Union. The entry of Mayotte in the EU in 2011 will be the first enlargement of the EU since the entry of Romania and Bulgaria in 2007.











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Old January 7th, 2009, 02:44 AM   #68
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The results of the last French census (Jan. 1, 2006 census) were published last week. We can now establish a new ranking of the largest cities in overseas France. Here the list, with the population in the urban areas as of Jan. 1, 2006. In parenthesis you can see the total population increase between the 1999 census and the 2006 census.

On January 1, 2006:
- Pointe-à-Pitre (Guadeloupe): 177,336 inh. (+3.2%)
- Fort-de-France (Martinique): 173,128 inh. (incl. Le Lamentin) (+1.7%)
- Saint-Denis-de-la-Réunion (Réunion): 168,910 inh. (+6.8%)
- Saint-Pierre (Réunion): 144,329 inh. (+11.7%)
- Cayenne (French Guiana): 100,323 inh. (incl. Matoury) (+19,2%)
- Saint-Paul (Réunion): 99,291 inh. (+13.2%)
- Le Port (Réunion): 64,390 inh. (+6.8%)
- Saint-André (Réunion): 51,817 inh. (+20.0%)
- Saint-Louis (Réunion): 49,455 inh. (+13.6%)
- Basse-Terre (Guadeloupe): 46,319 inh. (+3.2%)

The overseas collectivities in the Pacific have separate censuses on different dates than the general census for the rest of France. Only two cities from the overseas collectivities in the Pacific would make it in the list above. Here is the population in their urban areas, with the dates of the censuses:
- Nouméa (New Caledonia): 146,245 inh. (Sept. 2004 census)
- Papeete (French Polynesia): 131,695 inh. (Aug. 2007 census)
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Old February 2nd, 2009, 10:32 PM   #69
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Renderings of the new Prefecture buildings in Fort-de-France, Martinique, planned to be added to the old Prefecture. The Prefecture, which was originally the palace of the governor, was too small and needed to be enlarged.





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Old February 19th, 2009, 04:30 AM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minato ku View Post
Poverty is not so worse than in some departement of France.
Corruption is not higher than any other departement of France. (maybe even lower than in southern France)

These departement are in the first world.
A little Look of Saint Denis
http://www.flickr.com/photos/jikgoe/...7600251791199/
The pictures of Saint Denis in Réunion look like a provincial town of South America - with some (superficial) French touches, but definitely not First World
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Old August 26th, 2009, 01:10 PM   #71
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New general hospital under construction in Mamoudzou, capital of Mayotte. The hospital will be completed in 2010. Architects: Cardete & Huet, Atelier REC. Floor space: 12,000 m² (130,000 sq. ft). Cost: 20 million euros (28.5 million US dollars). Apparently the architects had trouble starting construction due to the insularity of Mayotte (harbor not fit for large boats carrying construction material).







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Old November 22nd, 2009, 12:05 PM   #72
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The 21-floor tower at the Pointe Simon, on the seafront of downtown Fort-de-France, Martinique, started construction earlier this year and is now rising above ground.

At 105.5 meters (346 feet) above street level, it will be the tallest tower in the Lesser Antilles. Here are the latest pictures of the construction site by Skyhig.

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Old November 23rd, 2009, 07:44 PM   #73
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Originally Posted by brisavoine View Post
News just in: Nicolas Sarkozy announced tonight that a referendum will be held in the overseas collectivity of Mayotte on March 29, 2009 to decide whether Mayotte will become a full-fledged département of France. Most likely the majority of the Mayotte people will vote in favor of becoming a French département. In that case, Mayotte (200,000 inhabitants and growing) will become the 101st French département in 2011 (the first département created since 1964), and will therefore also enter the European Union. The entry of Mayotte in the EU in 2011 will be the first enlargement of the EU since the entry of Romania and Bulgaria in 2007.
Does this mean Mayotte will be included on the euro bills?
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 02:32 AM   #74
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That Tram Train project looks quite interesting...











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Old January 23rd, 2010, 09:59 PM   #75
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That Tram Train project looks quite interesting...











Yes it is , but the local authorities have problems to finance the project.
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 10:28 PM   #76
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Some realisations and new projects in Fort de France

Cour Perrinon shopping mall

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Fort-de-France waterfront

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New justice court




Kerlys technopole in the periphery of Fort de France


Last edited by skyhig; January 24th, 2010 at 05:44 PM.
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Old January 23rd, 2010, 11:34 PM   #77
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Kampflamm has turned Réunionais?





Concerning that project, they currently have problems to finance it, and the central government in Paris doesn't seem willing to help them that much, so the project is a bit up in the air at the moment. However, Réunion is growing a lot, its population will pass 1 million before 2030, so I think they have no choice but to build it if they don't want traffic to choke the island very soon.

PS: Sarkozy visited Réunion this week, so he may have promised something about the tram-train (he has great plans to develop the economy of Réunion further, so the tram-train would seem necessary to prevent traffic jams that are detrimental to the local economy). I'll have to check what he said there. I'll let you know.
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Old January 24th, 2010, 11:23 AM   #78
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Well, I'm just interested in the outer territories of our European Empire (Reunion, Martinique, Azores etc.). After checking out out the Wikipedia-Article on Reunion I have to say that the population #s are quite stunning. I mean they pretty much doubled their population in a matter of 40 years. So I hope this project will go through. Are any EU-funds available for this?
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Old January 24th, 2010, 06:40 PM   #79
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Are any EU-funds available for this?
Apparently the European Investment Bank, the EU's long-term lending institution, will lend 400 million euros out of the 1.7 billion euros needed to build the tram train. This money will have to be paid back to the bank, it's not some regional subsidy.

See:
- in French: http://www.eib.europa.eu/projects/pi...8.htm?lang=fr&
- in German: http://www.eib.europa.eu/projects/pi...8.htm?lang=de&
- in English: http://www.eib.europa.eu/projects/pi...8.htm?lang=en&

Apart from these loans, the EU has apparently agreed to give 70 million euros for the project in regional subsidies (they don't have to be paid back).

Concerning the central French government, after checking the local newspapers, it seems Sarkozy said nothing about the tram train during his visit there earlier this week. Apparently the tram train has become a toy in the political contest between the Right and the Left who campaign for the regional elections that will take place in March this year. The Réunion region has been ruled by the Communist Party (!) for many years. It's the Reunionese Communist Party and its leader Paul Vergès who are behind the tram train project, and from what I understand the Right is now saying that the tram train is too costly for Réunion, but that seems a political ploy to weaken the Communists before the regional elections. That may explain why the central French government has been less supportive of the project recently (the prime minister François Fillon agreed to back the project if it didn't exceed 1.3 billion euros, but said 1.7 billion was way too much; note that "backing" doesn't mean the French government would finance the whole project, it just means they would give the AAA financial guarantee of the French government for the whole project, but they would finance directly only 435 million euros, the rest coming from the Réunion region, the EU, the European Investment Bank, and private companies who will then receive payments from the Réunion region over many years).

If the Communist Party wins the regional elections in March, probably the stance of the French government will change, they will become more supportive of the project and accept to back the 1.7 billion cost because Sarkozy reportedly needs the neutral attitude of the Reunionese Communists for the 2012 presidential elections. If the Right wins, they may scrap the whole project because it was launched by the Communists, but I think at the end of the day they may come back to their senses and recognize this tram train is necessary for Réunion, so they may finally continue the project, albeit with a few changes (different route here and there, etc.), just to show people it's their project, not the Communists' project.

Politics at its worst you might say! As Churchill used to say, democracy is the worst political system, except for all the other ones.

Here you have a website specially dedicated to the traim train of Réunion, notably showing the route that has been selected: http://www.tramtrain.fr/
Here the Wikipedia article in English: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/R%C3%A9union_Tram_Train


Last edited by brisavoine; January 24th, 2010 at 06:47 PM.
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Old January 24th, 2010, 07:10 PM   #80
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Some interesting details about the project:
- the line would be 41.5 km long
- there would be 26 stations: from the Réunion international airport, to the University of Réunion, to downtown St Denis (the capital of Réunion), to the international seaport of Réunion (which is separated from St Denis by a huge and ancient lava flow that the tram train would cross through tunnels), to the booming city of St Paul
- the total population in the 5 municipalies along the line is 338,387 inhabitants (in Jan. 2007)
- each tram-train could contain 250 passengers
- it is expected there would be 52,000 passengers per day on the line
- the tram train would have an average speed of 40 km per hour (100 km per hour outside of urbanized areas)
- it would take 40 minutes to go from St Paul to downtown St Denis, and 25 minutes from the international seaport to downtown St Denis
- the tram train would run from 5am to midnight, 7 days a week
- there would be one tram train every 10 minutes in each direction, but in St Denis the frequency would be higher with one tram train every 5 minutes in each direction (I suppose that means there would be some tram trains that would run only from the airport to downtown St Denis, otherwise I don't see how the frequency could be higher in St Denis than in the rest of the line)
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