daily menu » rate the banner | guess the city | one on oneforums map | privacy policy | DMCA | news magazine | posting guidelines

Go Back   SkyscraperCity > Infrastructure and Mobility Forums > Railways

Railways (Inter)national commuter and freight trains



Global Announcement

As a general reminder, please respect others and respect copyrights. Go here to familiarize yourself with our posting policy.


Reply

 
Thread Tools
Old April 18th, 2016, 03:54 PM   #2381
dimlys1994
Moderator
 
dimlys1994's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Dniepropetrovsk
Posts: 16,337
Likes (Received): 26123

From Rail Journal:

Quote:
http://www.railjournal.com/index.php...ml?channel=537

Bern bottleneck relief project breaks ground
Monday, April 18, 2016





SWISS Federal Railways (SBB), together with the Swiss federal office for transport (BAV), the canton of Bern and Switzerland's second largest railway BLS, has broken ground on a SFr 270m ($US 279.8m) project to relieve a bottleneck between Wylerfeld and Wankdorf, east of Bern

Dubbed "Unbundling Wylerfeld," the project will improve connections and punctuality for regional and long-distance services travelling in and out of Bern, and is due for completion in 2022

...
__________________
Для Вас:
Страница в ВК:

For you:
Facebook & Flickr pages

Zaz965 liked this post
dimlys1994 no está en línea   Reply With Quote

Sponsored Links
Old April 20th, 2016, 10:00 PM   #2382
steple
Registered User
 
steple's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 311
Likes (Received): 1142



http://www.railpictures.net/viewphot...571779&nseq=73
Georg Trüb, April 02, 2016, Ardez
For about 10 years, members of association "Club 1889", founded in 1996, worked in Samedan on the 2-6-0 steam locomotive G 3/4 # 11 "Heidi", which was built by SLM in 1902. The club name was choosen after the year 1889, when the first passenger car, C 2012, which was rebuilt by the association, was built. The "Mogul" steamlocomotive got a new all welded boiler, new pistons, new valves, a new chimney, superheater, and was converted to burn light oil by DLM Winterthur. Some work was done by the RhB in Landquart, but most was done by skilled members of Club 1889 in Samedan. Now the "Heidi" is finished and like new. On April 2nd, she pulled a train from Samedan to Scuol-Tarasp and back for the workers of the Club 1889 and some guests. Several of the passengers were wearing contemporaneous clothes. Here, the train stopped in Ardez for some minutes. The locomotive is pulling the 5 two-axle cars: C 2012 (first rebuilt vehicle of Club 1889), baggage car F 4004, B 2138 "Filisurer-Stübli", B 2060 and freight car L 6603 (with additional oil and water).
__________________
steple no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 26th, 2016, 01:09 AM   #2383
steple
Registered User
 
steple's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 311
Likes (Received): 1142



http://www.railpictures.net/viewphot...572953&nseq=40
Georg Trüb, April 12, 2016, Bürglen
"HVZ" (peak time) push pull train with 10 double deck cars and Re 420 in front and the rear. Train 19067 of the "S 23" service is running from Zürich to Romanshorn along the factory canal in Bürglen, pushed by Re 420 "LION" # 223 (rebuilt from Re 4/4 II # 11223 in 2013)
__________________
steple no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 26th, 2016, 07:50 PM   #2384
steple
Registered User
 
steple's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 311
Likes (Received): 1142



http://www.railpictures.net/viewphot...572455&nseq=56
Georg Trüb, April 08, 2016, Luzern
An interesting look at the early days of railway electrification. The locomotive Ge 2/4 # 207 of the Rhaetian Railway, built in 1913 for the new and from the beginning electrified (11'000 V AC, 16.7 Hz) line Bever-Scuol, was powered by a huge Déri repulsion motor, driving the two coupled axles directly via a rod, without any gear. This engine was developed by the Hungarian engineer Miksa Déri . The detached sidewall of the body allows a beautiful view of this drive technology. The Ge 2/4 # 207 was built as the last of a series (201-207) by SLM and BBC, was in use until 1974 and exhibited in the Swiss Museum of Transport in Lucerne since 1982.

From Wikipedia: A repulsion motor is a type of electric motor for use on alternating current (AC). It was formerly used as a traction motor for electric trains but has been superseded by other types of motors. Repulsion motors are classified under single phase motors. In repulsion motors the stator windings are connected directly to the AC power supply and the rotor is connected to a commutator and brush assembly, similar to that of a direct current (DC) motor.
__________________

Perennial Quest liked this post
steple no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 27th, 2016, 10:40 PM   #2385
steple
Registered User
 
steple's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 311
Likes (Received): 1142



http://www.railpictures.net/viewphot...40989&nseq=129
David Gubler, June 23, 2013, Salgesch
The Salgesch - Sierre section of the Rhone valley line from Brig to Lausanne is one of the most scenic locations of that line. The train is a Brig - Geneva Interregio service, which run every half an hour.
__________________
steple no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old April 29th, 2016, 12:29 AM   #2386
steple
Registered User
 
steple's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 311
Likes (Received): 1142



http://www.railpictures.net/viewphot...573144&nseq=29
Georg Trüb, April 14, 2016, Gland
Re 420 # 506 of the MBC is the former BLS locomotive with same number, bought from the SBB in 2004 (Re 4/4 II # 11142). It came to the MBC in autumn 2013 for a new gravel traffic between the 1 meter gauge network of the MBC near Apples over the standard gauge Morges-Gland line of the SBB. Here the locmotive is in the siding in Gland with 7 empty gravel cars for personnel training.
__________________
steple no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 2nd, 2016, 12:44 AM   #2387
steple
Registered User
 
steple's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 311
Likes (Received): 1142



http://www.railpictures.net/viewphot...07812&nseq=155
David Gubler, April 09, 2009, Fribourg
A Re 460 with an EW IV push-pull train is crossing the Grandfey viaduct over the Schiffenen lake.
The swans were a little more than a lucky coincidence - we had no bread to attract them, but assuming that they were used to humans throwing bread, we used little sticks instead, and they bought it, at least for some time.
__________________
steple no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 2nd, 2016, 01:28 AM   #2388
Wilhem275
The Transporter
 
Wilhem275's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Genoa & Venice [I]
Posts: 2,732
Likes (Received): 767

LOL, poor swans should sue Mr. Gubler for the trick
__________________
I've sold monorails to Brockway, Ogdenville, and North Haverbrooke, and by gum, it put them on the map!
Well, sir, there's nothing on earth like a genuine, bona fide, electrified, six-car monorail!

Marchionne means never having to say you're sorry.

Due to Photobucket f*cking up, most images won't be visibile in my old posts. If you need anything specific, please write me.
Wilhem275 no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 2nd, 2016, 01:33 AM   #2389
Suburbanist
on the road
 
Suburbanist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: the rain capital of Europe
Posts: 27,529
Likes (Received): 21236

Does SBB have a seismic protection plan in place w.r.t. these old rail viaducts?
__________________
YIMBY - Yes, in my backyard!
Suburbanist no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2016, 01:08 AM   #2390
suasion
Registered User
 
suasion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: New Sumplace
Posts: 823
Likes (Received): 1850

Subduction of Europe under the italiian terrane stopped a number of years ago and what you see in the Alps is uplifted crystaline basement. Continued closure of the Tethy's ocean (Med basin is a puddle of it, see also Zagros, Hindu Kesh, Himalayays etc.) means penninsular Italy gets Earthquakes and Volcanoes as the African plate descends; but the Swiss would be as well comet proofing as seismic proofing. The continued pressure from th African plate also prevents orogenic collapse of the Alps.
__________________

Shenkey liked this post
suasion no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 3rd, 2016, 08:58 AM   #2391
hammersklavier
Feral
 
hammersklavier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 597
Likes (Received): 423

Quote:
Originally Posted by suasion View Post
Subduction of Europe under the italiian terrane stopped a number of years ago and what you see in the Alps is uplifted crystaline basement. Continued closure of the Tethy's ocean (Med basin is a puddle of it, see also Zagros, Hindu Kesh, Himalayays etc.) means penninsular Italy gets Earthquakes and Volcanoes as the African plate descends; but the Swiss would be as well comet proofing as seismic proofing. The continued pressure from th African plate also prevents orogenic collapse of the Alps.
To tell you the truth this comment worries me somewhat. When it comes to plate boundaries, a lack of activity usually means that friction inside the system is what's holding it together, and this friction works against plate movements. Eventually, the stresses incurred by plate movements overcome the frictional forces, and the result is a major earthquake.

There's also a subtle contradiction here. If the subduction of Europe under the Alps (actually, it's more accurate to say IIRC that the African plate is overriding the Eurasian one; continental crust does not get subducted down to the mantle) has stopped, then shouldn't the closure of the Tethys Ocean have also stopped?

What we are seeing is more likely than not an intermission in geologic time, and the end of the intermission will occur when the frictional forces are overwhelmed ... i.e. a massive earthquake that starts the system moving again.
__________________

Shenkey liked this post
hammersklavier no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 4th, 2016, 12:39 AM   #2392
suasion
Registered User
 
suasion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: New Sumplace
Posts: 823
Likes (Received): 1850

Europe did subduct under Italy as the Tethys ocean closed, Italy used to be an Island but is now well and truely sutured onto Eurasia, The Jura mountains are the foreland of this process, where sedimentary layers are folded but not metamorphised, Similar rocks would have sat over the Alps as the crust thickened; rocks which have eroded away, allowing the deeply buried crystaline rocks we see in todays Alps to rise up as the crust keeps isostatic equilibrium. this does not conflict with the fact that the African plate (not the continent) is still subducting under Europe (The volcanoes are always on the overriding plate). One should remember, coastlines do not mark the edges of the continents; and that plates contain both oceanic and continental crust. Of course islands cannot subduct but neither do they have to be part of a larger plate, there are many micro continents in the mix too, e.g. half of California was one and it still slides along the San andreas fault as it is not fully docked( Thankfully Italy is). Anyway as all the other sides of Africa border growing ocean basins (bound only with passive margins) there is no danger of the plate changing direction anytime soon, orogenic collapse is quite unlikely as long as compressional forces remain.
Plate tectonics is a mindnumbingly slow process. Geologists consider the Himalays (which still grow) as young mountains because the are a mere 16 million years old, and their rise sudden and rapid. Engineering for future plate reconfigurations would IMO be taking futureproofing a little bit too far.
__________________

Shenkey, Vaud liked this post
suasion no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 4th, 2016, 12:59 AM   #2393
Suburbanist
on the road
 
Suburbanist's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: the rain capital of Europe
Posts: 27,529
Likes (Received): 21236

What about historical powerful earthquakes in Switzerland


source

Quote:
SED estimates that an earthquake with a magnitude of 6.5 to 7, like the Basel quake of 1356, will occur every 1,500 years. Such a quake would cause damage more than 100 kilometres from its centre. Several thousand deaths and tens of thousands of injuries would result. Property damage could run as high as CHF 50 to CHF 100 billion. According to SED, the most likely locations for such an event are the Alpine and Basel regions.
__________________
YIMBY - Yes, in my backyard!
Suburbanist no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 4th, 2016, 02:26 AM   #2394
hammersklavier
Feral
 
hammersklavier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 597
Likes (Received): 423

Quote:
Originally Posted by suasion View Post
Europe did subduct under Italy as the Tethys ocean closed, Italy used to be an Island but is now well and truely sutured onto Eurasia, The Jura mountains are the foreland of this process, where sedimentary layers are folded but not metamorphised, Similar rocks would have sat over the Alps as the crust thickened; rocks which have eroded away, allowing the deeply buried crystaline rocks we see in todays Alps to rise up as the crust keeps isostatic equilibrium. this does not conflict with the fact that the African plate (not the continent) is still subducting under Europe (The volcanoes are always on the overriding plate). One should remember, coastlines do not mark the edges of the continents; and that plates contain both oceanic and continental crust. Of course islands cannot subduct but neither do they have to be part of a larger plate, there are many micro continents in the mix too, e.g. half of California was one and it still slides along the San andreas fault as it is not fully docked( Thankfully Italy is). Anyway as all the other sides of Africa border growing ocean basins (bound only with passive margins) there is no danger of the plate changing direction anytime soon, orogenic collapse is quite unlikely as long as compressional forces remain.
Plate tectonics is a mindnumbingly slow process. Geologists consider the Himalays (which still grow) as young mountains because the are a mere 16 million years old, and their rise sudden and rapid.
While this post certainly made old Suburby doze off -- given his demonstrated (lack of) interest in or knowledge of geology -- it didn't make me.

Hmm as I recall, the Italic microplate is rotating counterclockwise about a fulcrum found more or less in Tuscany. This will obviously lead to the closure of the Adriatic basin. It also means the plate is moving independently of either the Eurasian (moving southeast) or African (moving northward) plates ... although one of its boundaries is the suture buried deep in the Alps.

In any event, Switzerland sits in the foreland of an active plate boundary. Eventually Italy will become some hills on an altiplano where the Mediterranean used-to-was (though not in our 10 x 10^10-great grandchildren's lifetimes). This means that Suburbanist's leading concern -- seismic retrofitting -- is a valid concern, as earthquakes can and will continue to happen in the region for the foreseeable future.

Incidentally, the thought just occurred to me: Continental crust floats on the asthenosphere the same way* as a wooden raft floats on water; oceanic crust the same way as an iron hull floats on water. This is why oceanic crust starts sinking towards the core when it's subducted -- have you seen pictures of the former Farallon plate? It's so cool! -- while continental collisions essentially turn into giant logjams.
Quote:
Engineering for future plate reconfigurations would IMO be taking futureproofing a little bit too far.
If we futureproofed that far ahead, we'd all have to live on the Canadian, South African, Australian, or Siberian cratons. :P
_______________
* Obviously it doesn't.

Last edited by hammersklavier; May 4th, 2016 at 02:32 AM.
hammersklavier no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 4th, 2016, 10:35 PM   #2395
suasion
Registered User
 
suasion's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
Location: New Sumplace
Posts: 823
Likes (Received): 1850

Basel earthquake 1356 lol. This was most likely related to the continued opening of the Rhine-graben, are you suggesting France and Germany should also earthquake proof? along the same Graben, you also have other areas like the Eiffel hot spot which may or may not cause a quake. The fact is an intraplate Earthquake could occur anywhere or nowhere, but they are of such low likeli.hood that as i said you would be as wise to invest in comet proofing.

Quote:
Hmm as I recall, the Italic microplate is rotating counterclockwise about a fulcrum found more or less in Tuscany. This will obviously lead to the closure of the Adriatic basin. It also means the plate is moving independently of either the Eurasian (moving southeast) or African (moving northward) plates ... although one of its boundaries is the suture buried deep in the Alps.
You are correct, but it as well to remember all the idea of a large rigid plate is just a simplisation; the large plates are all made up of numerous microplates or blocks that tend to rotate or slide to accommodate the movements and forces of the larger plate. But the serious earthquakes are focused (though not exclusive to) Subduction zones, shallow focus near the trench, deeper and less dangerous as you move towards and past the volcanic arc;and Orogonic zones, which can be very shallow focus. Iran, Pakistan, India, Nepal etc have had some devastating ones in recent memory. Even ancient African cratons have been remobilized by the rift valley, in fact the whole centre of the continent is tending to well up under all the compressional forces.
__________________

Suburbanist liked this post

Last edited by suasion; May 4th, 2016 at 10:40 PM.
suasion no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 6th, 2016, 11:00 AM   #2396
hammersklavier
Feral
 
hammersklavier's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: Philadelphia
Posts: 597
Likes (Received): 423

Quote:
Originally Posted by suasion View Post
Basel earthquake 1356 lol. This was most likely related to the continued opening of the Rhine-graben, are you suggesting France and Germany should also earthquake proof? along the same Graben, you also have other areas like the Eiffel hot spot which may or may not cause a quake. The fact is an intraplate Earthquake could occur anywhere or nowhere, but they are of such low likeli.hood that as i said you would be as wise to invest in comet proofing.
But that's the heart of the question -- it isn't just major quakes in the historical record. Is Switzerland affected by enough major quakes for mitigation to be important? It does sit in the shadow of an active orogen, which suggests it gets enough quakes for it to be at least worth considering. After all, Switzerland is in just as active an orogenic zone as e.g. Nepal.
Quote:
You are correct, but it as well to remember all the idea of a large rigid plate is just a simplisation; the large plates are all made up of numerous microplates or blocks that tend to rotate or slide to accommodate the movements and forces of the larger plate. But the serious earthquakes are focused (though not exclusive to) Subduction zones, shallow focus near the trench, deeper and less dangerous as you move towards and past the volcanic arc;and Orogonic zones, which can be very shallow focus. Iran, Pakistan, India, Nepal etc have had some devastating ones in recent memory. Even ancient African cratons have been remobilized by the rift valley, in fact the whole centre of the continent is tending to well up under all the compressional forces.
Something that puzzles me is the Great Appalachian Valley -- a low valley extending the length of the range, and separating the crystalline Appalachians to the east from the folded ridges to the west. I know it marks a suture between terranes, as the crystalline ridges are much older and considered part of Avalonia, but for the life of me I have no idea how a deep valley along the suture came to be. I mean, yes, all that's left is the core of a Triassic orogeny ... but I still don't get why the suture itself would take the form of a long, low valley?
hammersklavier no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2016, 12:43 AM   #2397
steple
Registered User
 
steple's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 311
Likes (Received): 1142



http://www.railpictures.net/viewphot...575738&nseq=21
Georg Trüb, May 07, 2016, between Feuerthalen and Schaffhausen
"Crocodile" Be 6/8 III # 13302 "flying" over the Rhine between Feuerthalen and Schaffhausen, pulling the Swiss Classic Train from Arbon via Romanshorn-Kreuzlingen-Stein am Rhein to Winterthur. The iconic vehicle from 1926 is on loan to and operated by "Betriebsgruppe 13302" in Rapperswil.
__________________

Perennial Quest liked this post
steple no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2016, 09:36 PM   #2398
IanCleverly
A New Kind of Medicine
 
IanCleverly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Caerphilly, South Wales
Posts: 446
Likes (Received): 230

Quote:
Originally Posted by swissinfo.ch
More long-distance bus companies are operating on European routes. They are a serious competitor to trains.

<snip>

In one example, a bus company providing direct connections between Zurich and Munich in Germany charges CHF18-48. For the same route, a full-fare train ticket costs CHF92 for a trip that takes 30 minutes longer.
As it's a video report, and as I'm unsure as to whether the code provided on the link there would work, you'll want to Click here to watch said piece.
IanCleverly no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 10th, 2016, 11:44 PM   #2399
steple
Registered User
 
steple's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Posts: 311
Likes (Received): 1142



http://www.railpictures.net/viewphot...=575932&nseq=0
Georg Trüb, May 05, 2016, above Faulensee
Re 460 # 032 is pushing Eurocity 7 Hamburg Altona - Interlaken Ost along the Thunersee above Faulensee near Spiez.
__________________
steple no está en línea   Reply With Quote
Old May 11th, 2016, 01:24 AM   #2400
Wilhem275
The Transporter
 
Wilhem275's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Genoa & Venice [I]
Posts: 2,732
Likes (Received): 767

I have a question about the new Zurich underground rail link (DML).
I read some parts of it are built with a 4% grade, while some other sources report a 3,7% (while TSI standards suggest a 3,5 max).

It is supposed to serve all kind of trains (S-RE-IC), but some reported there was a performance problem with Re 460 hauled trains.
Does anyone please have more detailed info about this issue?
(English, Italian, German is all fine)
__________________
I've sold monorails to Brockway, Ogdenville, and North Haverbrooke, and by gum, it put them on the map!
Well, sir, there's nothing on earth like a genuine, bona fide, electrified, six-car monorail!

Marchionne means never having to say you're sorry.

Due to Photobucket f*cking up, most images won't be visibile in my old posts. If you need anything specific, please write me.
Wilhem275 no está en línea   Reply With Quote


Reply

Tags
basel, zurich

Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Related topics on SkyscraperCity


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 08:24 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.11 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, vBulletin Solutions Inc.
Feedback Buttons provided by Advanced Post Thanks / Like (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

vBulletin Optimisation provided by vB Optimise (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2018 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.

SkyscraperCity ☆ In Urbanity We trust ☆ about us | privacy policy | DMCA policy

tech management by Sysprosium