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Old June 14th, 2005, 08:55 AM   #21
kostya
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hyacinthus
I was discussing this casually with a friend yesterday. He told me that to save energy, the passengers had to unlock and open the train doors to alight. However, doors were closed automatically before the train moves on. This is something new to me



I guess most trains stop operation at that kind of hours unless there is sufficient demand for it.

Yes, there is a red button which you have to press when the train stops to open the doors. I think it's right, i mean, sometimes the train is empty and still opening the doors, that's waste of energy . Of course Paris metro is somehow overcrowded most of the time...
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Old June 14th, 2005, 10:46 AM   #22
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I think that's only on L14. The older ones have a manual spring-release lever that you pull. But the doors close themselves, or I should say slam.
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Old June 14th, 2005, 10:51 AM   #23
hyacinthus
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hmmm... anyone has a picture to show that?
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Old June 14th, 2005, 12:28 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hyacinthus
hmmm... anyone has a picture to show that?
http://www.kevinhoffberg.com/images/.../MetroDoor.jpg
http://www.e-trading.co.jp/INFO/euro...is-Metro02.jpg

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Old June 14th, 2005, 12:35 PM   #25
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Thanks kostya

There are 2 types of opening mechanism? One with a lever and another with a green button to press?
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Old June 14th, 2005, 01:00 PM   #26
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I think i've seen both, commonly the one with the green button(it was red i remember ), The first one must be older i guess. If anyone knows anything else about this opening mechanism let us know
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Old June 14th, 2005, 01:05 PM   #27
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Mmm cant say I'm overly inspired by the Paris Metro. I'd use it when I do go to Paris, but it just doesnt do it for me like the Tube, Tokyo Subways or New York subways do!
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Old June 14th, 2005, 03:31 PM   #28
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PSD are mainly used in automated transit systems or in very recent classical metro line (Jubilee line in London) , that's why they're present on the Line 14 which is fully automated and opened in 1998.

I think Paris metro is one of the finest of the world:
- high density of stations
- high frequencies
- one fully automated heavy metro line
- two line having trains with full width gangways between coaches for easy movement throughout
- most of the lines have recent or refurbished rolling stock
- No line is completely closed for refurbishment (yes, I'm referring to some other subways in europe, here)
- Few technical problems

Someone should add pictures of the line 14 (I can't do that myself, being at work), which definitely has the most modern stations of Paris' subway.
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Old June 14th, 2005, 03:53 PM   #29
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Paris subway is a fantastic system, thys station is gorgeos
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Old June 14th, 2005, 04:02 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by samsonyuen
I think that's only on L14. The older ones have a manual spring-release lever that you pull. But the doors close themselves, or I should say slam.
Nope, there's a button to open the door on the lines 7,8 and 13. Doors of the lines 1 and 14 are fully automated.
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Old June 14th, 2005, 04:29 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arpels


Paris subway is a fantastic system, thys station is gorgeos
The picture is gorgeous, but not very true

This is the Arts-et-Métiers station IIRC. In real life it's very original, but slightly darker than in the picture

But something interesting in Paris is this kind of "theme" station. The Pasteur station is full of items related to medecine; Hotel de Ville, Bastille, Bienvenüe-Montparnasse, (Bienvenüe was the engineer who built the metro), and many other stations have special ornaments related to their context. In Assemblée Nationale (or maybe Concorde), you can read the french Declaration of Human Rights on the whole surface of the walls. In Cluny-la-Sorbonne, there are signatures of famous people (writers...) on the ceiling. And so on...
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Old June 14th, 2005, 04:34 PM   #32
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what's the theme of this station? It has the cogwheel-like sculpture on its ceiling but submarine windows and walls.
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Old June 14th, 2005, 04:43 PM   #33
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Arts-et-Métiers is a museum about techniques (you may see Blériot's plane there, for example; you may read about the museum in Umberto Eco's "Foucault's Pendulum"). So I suppose it's a kind of factory, but I don't stop very often in that station.
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Old June 14th, 2005, 04:49 PM   #34
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i see. It's a pendulum. All Paris stations have an artistic theme? Is there a website about all its stations?
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Old June 14th, 2005, 05:07 PM   #35
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Only 10 to 20 stations have a theme.

Here is a panoramic view for Arts-et-Métiers:



Many others remarkable panoramic and interactive views of Paris stations (in Java applets) are available at http://www.insecula.com/salle/EP0689_type2_page1.html (remarkable Web site).

For example:

Saint-Emilion (line 14):


Bonne Nouvelle:


Nationale:
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Old June 14th, 2005, 05:14 PM   #36
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Thanks thierry for the pics. I'll go look at the link.
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Old June 14th, 2005, 05:17 PM   #37
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Interesting! Unfortunately i didn't see any of these theme stations while i was in Paris...
Maybe next time
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Old June 14th, 2005, 05:56 PM   #38
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Other interesting stations, from Insecula:

Concorde (with the 1789 Declaration of Human Rights on the walls):


Varennes, near Musée Rodin (notice the statues)


Louvres-Rivoli, near the museum:


RER (a kind of metro that goes to the suburbs, bigger, uglier and less easy to use than the metro) in Charles-de-Gaulle-Etoile:
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Old June 14th, 2005, 06:02 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hyacinthus
I was discussing this casually with a friend yesterday. He told me that to save energy, the passengers had to unlock and open the train doors to alight. However, doors were closed automatically before the train moves on. This is something new to me
I don't think has anything to do with energy of the doors, but for keeping the temperature warm in winter in the trains.

Whenever a train stops at a station in winter, if all the doors open - on an outside platform anyway, gusts of cold air rush in and this is uncomfortable for passengers.

The point with this system is that doors only open if people actually need to get in or out at a particular station, and then only the doors actually in use.

Of cause, during busy hours doors will always open, but during the cold nights, I can imagine it would be quite annoying for passengers sitting next to the doors to freeze at every stop when the doors swing open, and gusts of ice cold wind blow in, even though no passengers may be using the doors.

This way, the cabin stay's warmer. I suppose, if the carriages are air conditioned, then in summer it will work the other way to keep the cabin cool.

This is quite common for European trains.
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Old June 14th, 2005, 06:18 PM   #40
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@Justme
I see... it makes sense too... I guess in a way, by making its door opening mechanism manual also helps to conserve energy cos less is required to maintain the temperature warm for its passengers. Thanks. It's interesting to learn a bit more.

@thierry
Thanks alot. I've seen those pics on the websites. Unfortunately, I don't understand French. So, not sure what was written there.
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