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Old March 2nd, 2009, 10:56 AM   #201
city_thing
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There was an incident a few weeks ago where a guy was seen on CCTV footage wandering around the City Loop tunnels. It happened just after 9am, and trains had to stop using the loop whilst guards/cops ran through the tunnels trying to find him.

From memory, they didn't catch him.

----

On a side note, how many tunnels does the City Loop actually consist of? Are there 4 tunnels the entire way, or two tunnels that branch out into 4 when approaching a station?
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Old March 2nd, 2009, 12:32 PM   #202
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Svartmetall View Post
I think they say "passenger action" in Britain. Lovely euphamism.
In Paris we use "incident voyageur", there is a suicide or suicide attempt about every two day in Paris metro.
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Old March 2nd, 2009, 12:48 PM   #203
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Minato ku View Post
In Paris we use "incident voyageur", there is a suicide or suicide attempt about every two day in Paris metro.
That's quite a frightening, sad, and high statistic.

In Vancouver, the term "medical emergency" is usually used. We don't usually have train-human accidents though.
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Old March 3rd, 2009, 06:32 AM   #204
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Quote:
Originally Posted by city_thing View Post
On a side note, how many tunnels does the City Loop actually consist of? Are there 4 tunnels the entire way, or two tunnels that branch out into 4 when approaching a station?
There are four tunnels, arranged as two pairs of tunnels stacked on top of each other. This correlates with the four "groups" of lines: the Northern group, the Clifton Hill group, the Burnley Group and the Caulfield Group. The groups are named after the main junction station on each group (Northern = North Melbourne).

Only the Clifton Hill tunnel actually has the connection to form a complete circle - all other tunnels only have enough connections to allow trains to return from where they came from. It's hard to explain without a diagram though.
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Old March 4th, 2009, 06:42 AM   #205
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deasine View Post
That's quite a frightening, sad, and high statistic.

In Vancouver, the term "medical emergency" is usually used. We don't usually have train-human accidents though.
Toronto is "personal injury at track level"

There was one yesterday but ironically, it was a real injury...someone slipped and fell onto the tracks, breaking an arm or wrist.

In Kuala Lumpur they use "track intrusion" (iirc).

Cheers, m
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Old March 19th, 2009, 06:00 AM   #206
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Nice pictures! I just feel i have to correct something in the initial post;
Quote:
Originally Posted by gappa View Post
the city loop is underground. It was constructed in the 70's and 80's to relieve strain on Flinders St Station, but is now itself nearing capacity
My understanding is that's not actually true, the city loop is nowhere near capacity. It currently runs at something like 40% of the number of services it was designed for, so they can more than double the number of services before starting to worry about reaching maximum capacity.

The thing with the city loop is that it was designed to serve another four or five tracks on top of the tracks that currently feed into it.
Quote:
Originally Posted by gappa
Big news for Melbourne's train network with a new underground line cutting beneath the city from Footscray to Caufield being announced today as part of the States $38 billion transport plan. Also major infrastructure upgrades and rolling stock purchases.
It should be mentioned that the underground line is controversial; they shipped in a pro-privatisation guy from England (the department is basically staffed with conservative ideologues) to make the tunnel proposal look good, and ignored all the local input except for the people who already agreed with them.

Paul Mees wrote a whole report about why the underground line is unnessecary. He also pointed out that they could build those extra tracks that they never constructed four times over with the money thats being splashed on a single tunnel.

Should also be noted that the $38 billion figure they like to throw about is roads + rail. Only $8 billion of that is actually going to the train system.
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Old March 19th, 2009, 09:31 AM   #207
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Increased dwell times plus whingers complaining about confusion re. Flinders St direct vs City Loop services means that the originally planned capacity is unachievable. Additionally, the nature of services has changed - gone are the locals terminating at places like Box Hill, Essendon or Oakleigh. With a more spread out population, there is a greater demand for express services to serve outer suburban passengers, thus taking away train paths and creating bottleneck problems such as those at Caulfield Junction. If you don't fix these problems with triple/quad tracks, grade separation and buying trains with fewer seats and more doors and standing room, it doesn't matter how good the loop is, you're still going to have capacity constrained due to other causes.

Privatisation has nothing to do with these issues. Supporters of nationalisation are merely driving debate to an area where any change would bring few advantages. Additionally, there is a tendency to look at the past through rose-tinted glasses. The network wasn't any better under government management than it was under private management.

Anyway, the main thread is in the OzScrapers Transportation section. There are more than 2200 posts over about two years so you might want to only read the last couple of pages.
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Old April 21st, 2009, 04:47 PM   #208
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Roxburgh Park Station

I live in da area and thank god metlink thought of putting a station in Roxburgh Park. Now i don't have to go to b'medows or Glenroy
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Old May 18th, 2009, 11:40 PM   #209
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dissembly View Post
Nice pictures! I just feel i have to correct something in the initial post;
My understanding is that's not actually true, the city loop is nowhere near capacity. It currently runs at something like 40% of the number of services it was designed for, so they can more than double the number of services before starting to worry about reaching maximum capacity.

The thing with the city loop is that it was designed to serve another four or five tracks on top of the tracks that currently feed into it.It should be mentioned that the underground line is controversial; they shipped in a pro-privatisation guy from England (the department is basically staffed with conservative ideologues) to make the tunnel proposal look good, and ignored all the local input except for the people who already agreed with them.

Paul Mees wrote a whole report about why the underground line is unnessecary. He also pointed out that they could build those extra tracks that they never constructed four times over with the money thats being splashed on a single tunnel.

Should also be noted that the $38 billion figure they like to throw about is roads + rail. Only $8 billion of that is actually going to the train system.
Aside from the lines mentioned in the posting subsequent to yours, there are the Port Melbourne & St Kilda lines- now tram lines- which shuttled from Flinders St. to each of their destinations a few km away 10 times an hour, off-peak.

No-one's allocating $38 billion here, but $3.2 billion has ben allocated by the Federal Government for this, and the people of Melbourne (and surrounding areas) should count themselves lucky. As the Premier remarked, they'd got the best deal, nationwide.

Since this is a global thread, I'll explain what's going on here: for a start, with a map: from the Ministry of Infrastructure.



The map above indicates the proposed "Metro" system in 2020. Most of this rail network exists currently, although the changes that need to be made are not insignificant. The new lines proposed are the black line from west of Werribee to Sunshine, and the pale blue line from Sunshine (in places dotted) to Caulfield. There are sundry other extensions proposed or under way, but compared to these they are minor matters.

Currently, as has been previously stated, almost all suburban traffic circles the Melbourne CBD through 4 independent tunnels. Mr. Mees thinks that there should be more trains running through these tunnels: Mr. Mees doesn't drive trains, and neither do I. My observation is, at peak hour, trains are neck and neck through those tunnels.

Look at the map above. It's labelled "Melbourne Metro 2020", but in fact Bendigo and Traralgon are both 160 km from the city: and those black lines (V/Line) account for more than 10 outbound trains per hour for a couple of hours during the afternoon peak through my station, and the same applies inbound in the morning. The traffic on them is rising, and so is the suburban traffic. Incidentally, Pakenham is 64 km from the CBD, and Werribee is 34 or so, so, leaving aside the 320 km run from Traralgon to Bendigo, the city's network is about 100 km across. Of course, things extend further.

In a nutshell, what this project provides, and I hope it get through to completion, is several simple things:
  1. Dismantling of three of the four suburban groups into "two-tiered" systems.

    By this I mean: inner (local) and outer (express) services. Note the eastern (right-hand) services. The outer red services from Belgrave and Lilydale run express to the city and run round the loop; the inner (pink) services from Blackburn, Alamein and Glen Waverley terminate at Flinders Street (in the CBD). Currently they mostly all just run around the loop.

  2. Separation of the regional traffic from the suburban traffic

    The regional traffic is indicated in black. Separating it from the local traffic is hardly a radical notion, anywhere else, even in Sydney.

  3. Construction of a north-south underground linking the CBD with the University Precinct (Parkville) and the St. Kilda Road Precinct to the south.

    This is one of the aspects of this plan which is contentious here: the pale blue route. Some people want new lines: and that's why Paul Mees is still carping about forty-year old timetables. The Government has instead chosen to build where there is obvious overcrowding, anticipated to increase.
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Old June 25th, 2009, 05:51 AM   #210
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http://www.theage.com.au/national/ne...0625-cxgx.html

New train, tram operators for Melbourne
Clay Lucas and Mex Cooper
June 25, 2009 - 11:13AM

Connex has been stripped of its contract to operate Melbourne's train system, with Hong Kong-backed company Metro Trains Melbourne to take its place.

The city's trams will also have a new operator with Keolis Downer EDI ousting the incumbent Yarra Trams as the government's preferred tenderer.

The fresh contracts will begin in December, with the new operators offered an initial eight-year term, with an option to extend for a further seven years.

The decision to oust Connex is likely to be warmly greeted by train passengers who have become increasingly infuriated with late, overcrowded and cancelled services across the network.

May was the fifth month in a row that Melbourne trains did not meet punctuality targets with almost one in 10 failing to arrive at their destination on time.

Connex this year had $11 million wiped from its revenue by the Government after 2.8 per cent of all train services were cancelled in the first months of the year.

MTM is a joint venture between Hong Kong's MTR Corporation Ltd, Australian companies John Holland Melbourne Rail Franchise Pty Ltd and United Group Rail Services Ltd. MTR also operates the London Overground rail service.

The new contract will include a customer service regime, offering incentives for MTM to improve customer service announcements, cleanliness, graffiti removal and increased personal safety on the rail network.

The contract will also include a 50 per cent increase in funding for rail maintenance.

Announcing the tender winners this morning, Premier John Brumby said MTM had a proven track record of operating metropolitan train networks, achieving 99 per cent reliability on Hong Kong's mass transit system.

The new operator would bring "significant change" to Melbourne's transport network, he told reporters.

Asked if the decision was a condemnation of Connex, Mr Brumby said it "wasn't helpful to look back", but he admitted there were elements of Connex's performance that "obviously could have been improved".

He said the final cost of the contracts had yet to be decided, although he believed the winning bids represented value for money.

The tender decision had been based on reliability, punctuality, cleanliness, safety and cost, he said.

Public Transport Minister Lynne Kosky, a regular target of commuter fury, said MTM would deliver improved reliability and fewer cancellations for Melbourne's train passengers.

She said the change in operators would not affect current train and tram employees, who would be transferred to the new companies.

The government is yet to release the new names or livery for the city's train and tram networks.

Keolis Downer EDI (KDR), a consortium made up French firm Keolis and Australian maintenance provider Downer EDI, will also be offered an eight-year term with an option for a further seven years to run Melbourne's trams.

Mr Brumby said KDR's bid showed it was committed to customer service, including a greater focus on staff training and providing more timely and accurate information to passengers.

"Our trams are an iconic symbol of our city and KDR has proven strategies to improve services, reduce cancellations and increase maintenance. KDR operates four tram networks in France,'' he said.
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Old June 27th, 2009, 07:10 PM   #211
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New North Melbourne Station, as yet incomplete:





Apart from the the replacement of Connex as the operator of the system at the end of the year, and te rolling introduction of a new fleet of trains being assembled in Ballarat, trackworks are proceeding at Laverton, Westall, expansions of the system to South Morang, and electrification of the line to Sunbury.
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Old September 8th, 2009, 06:07 PM   #212
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http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/sto...7-2862,00.html



Under-city rail plan to cut Melbourne congestion

Stephen McMahon

September 09, 2009 12:00am

COMMUTERS sick of chronic overcrowding can look forward to a new underground rail service tipped to slash congestion on north and western lines.

It will come with a $100 million underground station at Parkville to service the hospital and university sector.

The new service will link Flinders St station with Melbourne Central and on to Parkville before joining up with the Footscray line.

The link will allow an additional 14 trains every hour on the Craigieburn, Sunbury, Werribee, Williamstown and Upfield lines -- the equivalent of 12,000 seats.

The line is a key part of the $4.5 billion extension of the city's underground train network, set to revolutionise the way people move around.

Premier John Brumby will unveil plans for the new line and station as part of the $38 billion Victorian Transport Plan.

It will be the first new underground line in Melbourne since the completion of the city loop almost 25 years ago.

Mr Brumby said the service would allow thousands more passengers on the suburban rail network, and shape the future growth of the CBD and inner Melbourne.

"We are building a better transport system so people can spend more time with family and less time commuting," Mr Brumby said.

The service will provide direct rail access to Melbourne University and the nearby Women's Hospital and the Royal Children's Hospital.

Mr Brumby said the Parkville station would also provide a seamless link from the inner west to the St Kilda Road precinct.

The Parkville station will also serve as an interchange point for trains, trams and buses in the inner-northern suburbs.

Soil and engineering testing works are expected to start before the end of the year, but construction is not due to start until 2012.

Transport Minister Lynne Kosky said: "We are now starting the first stage of what will be a massive infrastructure project, which will create thousands of jobs and shape the growth of inner Melbourne."

New Branding for Melbourne Trains



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Old September 8th, 2009, 08:58 PM   #213
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So this is actually an underground extension of the existing commuter rail system, or is it a new metro? By the look of the vehicle it appears as the latter, but by the description it sounds like the former.
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Old September 9th, 2009, 10:09 AM   #214
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Dwdwone you're right, this is an extension to the existing commuter rail system. However the plan is to turn what is now a commuter/metro hybrid into a 'heavy rail metro'...and that means whatever the government wants it to. They are doing this by building this tunnel, separating regional trains from the metropolitan system and separating metropolitan lines. The new branding is a result of Connex losing the train franchise in Melbourne. I guess the government thinks you can make a metro system by just calling it a metro system. A lot cheaper than spending real money too...

More pics









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Old September 10th, 2009, 04:55 AM   #215
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Seems like a good idea just the same, whether a proper 'metro' or no.
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Old November 28th, 2009, 01:14 PM   #216
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Melbourne rocks! with major projects of over 38 billions dollars, Melbourne will have the best transit system than any other state in Australia!, we already have more train lines than any other Australian city and the biggest tram network and it's only getting bigger!

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Old November 30th, 2009, 04:45 AM   #217
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Recently there has been a small amount of investment in station improvements, partial resleepering of track and the purchase of a few new trains to replace old ones. The $38bilAUD investment into the network is definitly needed, hopefully it will turn things around, and bring the Melbourne Suburban System upto the same standard as the networks in Sydney and Perth.
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Old November 30th, 2009, 11:25 AM   #218
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kichigai View Post
Dwdwone you're right, this is an extension to the existing commuter rail system. However the plan is to turn what is now a commuter/metro hybrid into a 'heavy rail metro'...and that means whatever the government wants it to. They are doing this by building this tunnel, separating regional trains from the metropolitan system and separating metropolitan lines. The new branding is a result of Connex losing the train franchise in Melbourne. I guess the government thinks you can make a metro system by just calling it a metro system. A lot cheaper than spending real money too...

More pics





I find it amusing that the Victorian Government chose to use ICE trains in these renders. Silly oversight.

Unless of course they're actually wanting to run German High Speed trains on an Australian suburban network.
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Old December 1st, 2009, 09:27 AM   #219
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kichigai View Post
Dwdwone you're right, this is an extension to the existing commuter rail system. However the plan is to turn what is now a commuter/metro hybrid into a 'heavy rail metro'...and that means whatever the government wants it to. They are doing this by building this tunnel, separating regional trains from the metropolitan system and separating metropolitan lines. The new branding is a result of Connex losing the train franchise in Melbourne. I guess the government thinks you can make a metro system by just calling it a metro system. A lot cheaper than spending real money too...
The name METRO was chosen by the new operator, MTR of Hong Kong. Maybe a throw back and variation of the name used prior to privatisation. The name has nothing to do with the government, except I beleive the Government didn't want the operators name used.
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Old February 26th, 2010, 10:23 PM   #220
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Recent Developments on the Melbourne "Metro" System

As I've argued for years, no-one actually knows what a "Metro" is. Anyway, here's what's happening to Melbourne's "heavy rail" (broad gauge) transport system, as opposed to it's trammway/light rail system:

Laverton Station: new footbridge with 4 lifts, & a new platform to be swung into action end of next week.
Note the unconnected track at the rear; city in the rear. This will effectively make one train service into two.





Further up the track: a new junction near Altona; nine new carriage sidings at Newport to store the new trains coming on line.

Footscray Station: a new footbridge, allegedly to be opened next week (some of these photos are not quite current):





North Melbourne: a done deal now:







In the same area (the west) I understand a contract has been let to extend the electrified system 15 km to Sunbury; and at Craigieburn there are additional carriage train storage facilities being built.

The NE of Victoria has been entirely converted to standard gauge: requiring a new platform at Broadmeadows, and upgrading of other tracks in the area.

North East Melbourne: the Merri Creek viaduct was duplicated:





And, across the network, signalling is being upgraded to LED's:



A persistent problem in the intense heat of Melbounre summers- high forties celsius- has been the expansion & warping of track, which is being addressed by a successive replacement of wooden by concrete sleepers. Re-sleepering the lines to the interstate borders west and north-east has also just been accomplished.

Nunawading Station was recently lowered beneath ground level to remove a crossing with a major roadway (Springvale Road).

In the NE, duplication of the track from Thomastown to Epping is underway, and extension of the line, under ground level, to "South Morang".

In the SE, a facility equivalent to what I portrayed above at Laverton is being constructed at Westall, and at Cranbourne, more sidings to store trains.

Aside from this, there are a number of new stations being planned or constructed: 5 or 6 in total. I understand that "Coolaroo" has reached the stage of having track realignments, but haven't been there to check it out.
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