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Old July 31st, 2015, 05:18 PM   #3381
Kanadzie
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which way you going ? You know Edmonton airport is nowhere near Edmonton

Hwy 93 from Jasper to Banff is a nice route. From airport you could go south to Red Deer, I would say pass by Hwy 11A through Sylvan Lake, straight to Hwy 11, Rocky Mountain House and meet Hwy 93 there (but you miss the north section...)

Alberta has really impressive variety in landscape

You have this flat expanse of nothing : https://www.google.pl/maps/place/Bro...38ccbe9fee9a51

But also this bumpy expanse of nothing :
https://www.google.pl/maps/place/Ban...afaebedaac9463

and in-between expanse of nothing
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ed...6bc8dc!6m1!1e1

and this: https://www.google.pl/maps/place/Red...1644b0!6m1!1e1

and occasional city... https://www.google.pl/maps/place/Cal...6d3bb1b652b63a
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Old July 31st, 2015, 05:21 PM   #3382
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I was wondering if the Dempster Highway is something of a cultural icon of Canada. It is the only road across the polar circle in Canada and the only road to the Arctic Ocean. Do Canadians generally know of the Dempster, or is only known in the region and to road enthusiasts?
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Old July 31st, 2015, 05:25 PM   #3383
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the second one... I don't think even 1 % of people outside the territories would even know what you mean...
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Old July 31st, 2015, 06:00 PM   #3384
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kanadzie View Post
which way you going ? You know Edmonton airport is nowhere near Edmonton
Well, it's closer to Edmonton than most of the London airports are to London

Quote:
Hwy 93 from Jasper to Banff is a nice route. From airport you could go south to Red Deer, I would say pass by Hwy 11A through Sylvan Lake, straight to Hwy 11, Rocky Mountain House and meet Hwy 93 there (but you miss the north section...)

Alberta has really impressive variety in landscape

You have this flat expanse of nothing : https://www.google.pl/maps/place/Bro...38ccbe9fee9a51

But also this bumpy expanse of nothing :
https://www.google.pl/maps/place/Ban...afaebedaac9463

and in-between expanse of nothing
https://www.google.com/maps/place/Ed...6bc8dc!6m1!1e1

and this: https://www.google.pl/maps/place/Red...1644b0!6m1!1e1

and occasional city... https://www.google.pl/maps/place/Cal...6d3bb1b652b63a
I love those empty opens spaces. Really enjoyed my trip to Dakotas and Kansas couple of years ago.

But this time mountains are the main focus.
So, we are planning to stay only one night in Edmonton area (as we are arriving in the evening) and then head straight to Jasper. Then to Lake Louise via Icefield Parkway, then taking TCH to Vancouver then south to Seattle and then east to Glacier National Park in Montana via eastern Washington state. After crossing the Rockies again (via Going-to-the-Sun-Road) we are planning to head to Banff via Hwy 22 and 40. Then going back to Edmonton via Calgary.

Those are of course early plans. We often modify our route depending on time we spend in different locations and on the weather.

BTW, do you guys have any recommendations about car rental companies?
I know that National in the US let you choose any car from the category you booked. You just pick it up yourself from the section of the parking lot and clerk in the office doesn't make selection of a particular model for you. Do they use the same system in Canada?

I made early booking (but didn't pay yet) with Budget as they seems to be the cheapest.

If you have any advice feel free to send me prv message not to clutter this thread.

Last edited by geogregor; July 31st, 2015 at 06:10 PM.
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Old July 31st, 2015, 06:32 PM   #3385
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worst case you can always ask the clerk what car they have and what they'll give you... usually they let me pick but I always get the "low class" car so the pick isn't very pleasant (once: Do you want a Rondo or a Caliber?, LOL)

In Poland I reserved a Twingo but they had none so gave me an Astra. I shut my mouth not to spoil my good luck
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Old July 31st, 2015, 10:41 PM   #3386
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Calgary Ring Road

Kenney announces $583M in federal cash for southwest Calgary ring road

The Conservative government anted up $583-million for Calgary’s long-awaited southwest ring road on Thursday as it continued to hand out cash ahead of an imminent federal election.

The provincial NDP government elected this spring announced earlier this month it had given the go-ahead to the final section of the ring road project, which it had inherited from the former Progressive Conservative government.

NDP Transportation Minister Brian Mason, who was on hand for the announcement, said the federal funding won’t change the projected timeline, which anticipates construction to begin next year and completed in 2022.
Full report: http://calgaryherald.com/news/politi...gary-ring-road

Other source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgar...tawa-1.3174578
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Old August 1st, 2015, 09:40 AM   #3387
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All in the last week..................feds commit billions to Calgary LRT and Ring Road, Ottawa LRT extension, Toronto GO Rail grade separation, and an imminent Edmonton LRT funding commitment.

Good thing I don't have a suspicious mind or I would think this is somehow connected to the federal election call that is to happen in just 2 days for an Oct/2015 election. Our politicians integrity is beyond reproach so I'm sure it's pure coincidence.
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Old August 1st, 2015, 10:51 AM   #3388
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
said the federal funding won’t change the projected timeline, which anticipates construction to begin next year and completed in 2022
Why so long? Is this construction so challenging technologically?
6 years for road construction is a lot.
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Old August 1st, 2015, 11:26 AM   #3389
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I was surprised by that as well. Though the plans for the southwestern leg are pretty extensive, it's not just a rural two-lane freeway, but mostly an eight-lane freeway with a huge median and large and complex interchanges.

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Old August 2nd, 2015, 08:10 AM   #3390
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Big project and that is one hell of a big medien and large complicated overpasses considering it's on the outskirts of the city. Certainly makes for another drive and easy to widen and accidents in one direction don't effect traffic in the other.

God I wish BC could build roads like that, BC's road system is hopeless.
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Old August 2nd, 2015, 09:23 PM   #3391
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BC seems capable of building great roads, but making a system is altogether different
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Old August 2nd, 2015, 10:11 PM   #3392
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And they have 120 km/h in British Columbia
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Old August 4th, 2015, 08:00 PM   #3393
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
And they have 120 km/h in British Columbia
Ontario should take note.

100 km/h max speed (even of the 401 roadway) is one of the slowest legal speed limits in the developed world (and reportedly the slowest max speed within the North American continent)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Klimek of stop100.ca
“Doing 100 on the 401 is a joke. There are no pedestrians, no kids playing with balls, no drivers backing out of driveways. These highways are the safest roads there are.”
Also, if I'm not mistaken, the design speed of the 401 can accommodate way beyond 140 km/h. So yeah the 100 km/h speed limit on such a massive roadway is retarded for sure.

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/globe...ticle18785514/
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Old August 4th, 2015, 09:54 PM   #3394
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I think the design speed is 130 km/h.
But that doesn't mean much, on Polish autostrada design speed is 130 too but sign shows 140

The 401 in the general vicinity (say... 100 km) of the Greater Toronto Area moves much faster than its extremities though. Near the Quebec border if you go 115 km/h you will pass all the cars. But west of Cobourg, like that area with the ups and downs approaching Hwy 35/115 you go 140 km/h and just be following the traffic flow. I suspect you start getting traffic that is commuter and "knows the road" and where the cops hide...
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Old August 5th, 2015, 03:18 AM   #3395
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Speed limits are really just a suggestion in Ontario.
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Old August 5th, 2015, 05:06 AM   #3396
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I'm not sure. OPP enforcement tactics can be very VoPo at times.
The normal GTA is generally fine. But go to Eastern Ontario 401/417 (with unmarked black Venzas I've seen around Cornwall, or like they had Mercedes SUV's 15 years ago), or drive Hwy 17, or towards Cambridge... or hiding behind overpass pillars on the Niagara QEW... like walking in a shooting gallery.

A few weeks ago at 2 AM (!) I rolled on #17 into a small Northern Ontario town maybe 150 km west of Thunder Bay, past a sign MAX 60, I look at my clock, see maybe 65... OPP sitting at the side of the road sets his cherries on for me... what a country
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Old August 5th, 2015, 09:27 PM   #3397
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Cost of Regina bypass now pegged at $1.88B

The Regina bypass, billed as the city's biggest-ever construction project, will cost $1.88 billion, the province now says.

That's up from a previous estimate that pegged costs at $1.2 billion.

While the old estimate included construction costs alone, the higher number also factors in costs due to design, finance, operations and maintenance over 30 years, provincial officials say, in explaining the difference.
Full report: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskat...-88b-1.3180152

It's always difficult to compare PPP projects with conventional funding methods. PPP includes not only the construction cost, but also financing cost (interest) and maintenance over the concession period. These are almost always not included in conventionally (government) funded project estimates, which makes it look as if PPP projects are wildly more expensive than regular projects.
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Old August 5th, 2015, 09:35 PM   #3398
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
Cost of Regina bypass now pegged at $1.88B

The Regina bypass, billed as the city's biggest-ever construction project, will cost $1.88 billion, the province now says.

That's up from a previous estimate that pegged costs at $1.2 billion.

While the old estimate included construction costs alone, the higher number also factors in costs due to design, finance, operations and maintenance over 30 years, provincial officials say, in explaining the difference.
Full report: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskat...-88b-1.3180152

It's always difficult to compare PPP projects with conventional funding methods. PPP includes not only the construction cost, but also financing cost (interest) and maintenance over the concession period. These are almost always not included in conventionally (government) funded project estimates, which makes it look as if PPP projects are wildly more expensive than regular projects.
In addition, the PPP-financed projects often tend to get complete much earlier than the government-driven ones. (This may, of course, vary across countries) This has a value, too. There are quality factors, too: Because the PPP service provider will be responsible for the maintenance, it is beneficial to the service provider to build the road following high quality standards. The savings from this dimension are speculative.
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Old August 5th, 2015, 10:47 PM   #3399
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Map: Edmonton’s most-needed interchanges

According to a city report, the Capital City needs 66 new or significantly updated interchanges over the next 30 to 50 years.

Due to the rate at which Edmonton is growing, the report says the changes and additions are needed to help manage traffic issues.

The report pegs the cost of the 66 projects between $4 billion and $7 billion.
http://globalnews.ca/news/1615694/ma...-interchanges/

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Old August 5th, 2015, 10:55 PM   #3400
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Quote:
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In addition, the PPP-financed projects often tend to get complete much earlier than the government-driven ones. (This may, of course, vary across countries) This has a value, too. There are quality factors, too: Because the PPP service provider will be responsible for the maintenance, it is beneficial to the service provider to build the road following high quality standards. The savings from this dimension are speculative.
PPP projects may overall be slightly more expensive than government projects (they want some profit and governments can generally borrow money at lower interest rates), but the benefits of having infrastructure completed much faster or earlier are also significant.

This is major factor which I think is not highlighted enough in for example Germany. They only focus on the cost of PPP projects, but not on the additional benefits. Especially with the big difference in construction speed between PPP and conventionally funded projects in Germany. Conventionally funded projects are almost always constructed at an excessively slow pace.

Having an infrastructure fund also helps speeding up the construction pace, as it is not as dependent on the annual budget cycle - provided the fund is adequately funded. One major benefit is that the entire funding is available for construction, not just blocks of funding allocated separately each year from the general budget.
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