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Old November 4th, 2015, 11:43 AM   #3521
ChrisZwolle
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100 km/h is a ridiculously slow speed limit on long-distance freeways. Most European countries have a 120 - 130 km/h speed limit and a fatality rate that is lower than in Canada.

The low speed limits is something of the 'New World'. The U.S. until recently had many states where you were only allowed 65 - 70 mph, and there are still a number of states enforcing these low speed limits. In Australia, the maximum speed limit is only 110 km/h. In New Zealand, the maximum speed limit is 100 km/h, similar to Ontario and Québec.

Norway was the last European country with a 100 km/h motorway speed limit. They recently went up to 110, but until about 10 years ago they hardly had any motorways outside urban areas. Sweden has a 110 km/h motorway speed limit, though they have 'trials' with 120 km/h on certain stretches for a long period of time now.

Ontario could play two routes; demand a politically unrealistic increase to 130 km/h and get a compromise of 110 or 120, or play it safe to advocate for a modest increase to 110 or 120. Either way, 100 km/h is way too slow. Do politicians ever drive a car?
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Old November 4th, 2015, 12:10 PM   #3522
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NFZANMNIM View Post
we were once stopped on the way from Toronto to Ottawa near Kingston on 401 for doing 116 km/h
So it is, although rarely, strictly reinforced. Especially on long weekends. (The time we got fined was the Canada day long weekend)
I drove across the west (BC and Alberta) recently and saw very little enforcement. In fact I saw a very few police patrols. Definitely less than I normally see on my trips in the US.
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Old November 4th, 2015, 10:23 PM   #3523
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
100 km/h is a ridiculously slow speed limit on long-distance freeways. Most European countries have a 120 - 130 km/h speed limit and a fatality rate that is lower than in Canada.

The low speed limits is something of the 'New World'. The U.S. until recently had many states where you were only allowed 65 - 70 mph, and there are still a number of states enforcing these low speed limits. In Australia, the maximum speed limit is only 110 km/h. In New Zealand, the maximum speed limit is 100 km/h, similar to Ontario and Québec.

Norway was the last European country with a 100 km/h motorway speed limit. They recently went up to 110, but until about 10 years ago they hardly had any motorways outside urban areas. Sweden has a 110 km/h motorway speed limit, though they have 'trials' with 120 km/h on certain stretches for a long period of time now.

Ontario could play two routes; demand a politically unrealistic increase to 130 km/h and get a compromise of 110 or 120, or play it safe to advocate for a modest increase to 110 or 120. Either way, 100 km/h is way too slow. Do politicians ever drive a car?
I guess this is because of the recurring "people drive faster than the speed limit, so if we raise it, people will drive even faster because they systematically drive faster than the speed limit" logic. Something that only seems to work for politicians, because it has been proven wrong again and again. Today speed enforcement is too cheap and easy, and if there's a will to do it a speed limit can be easily enforced. With today's technology, you can set a 130 km/h and ensure that no one drives faster without getting a ticket, even in long distances and/or remote places.

It's not only a Canadian thing -it's the same old story in every country with low speed limits. Throw in a bunch of weak politicians and overreacting mass media and that's what you get: nothing is done.
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Old November 5th, 2015, 01:28 AM   #3524
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There is a big OPP detachment in Kingston, the Kingston area is probably the most likely to see police.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
100 km/h is a ridiculously slow speed limit on long-distance freeways. Most European countries have a 120 - 130 km/h speed limit and a fatality rate that is lower than in Canada.

The low speed limits is something of the 'New World'. The U.S. until recently had many states where you were only allowed 65 - 70 mph, and there are still a number of states enforcing these low speed limits. In Australia, the maximum speed limit is only 110 km/h. In New Zealand, the maximum speed limit is 100 km/h, similar to Ontario and Québec.

Norway was the last European country with a 100 km/h motorway speed limit. They recently went up to 110, but until about 10 years ago they hardly had any motorways outside urban areas. Sweden has a 110 km/h motorway speed limit, though they have 'trials' with 120 km/h on certain stretches for a long period of time now.

Ontario could play two routes; demand a politically unrealistic increase to 130 km/h and get a compromise of 110 or 120, or play it safe to advocate for a modest increase to 110 or 120. Either way, 100 km/h is way too slow. Do politicians ever drive a car?
Typically they are chauffeured
There was a brouhaha in Quebec about 5-10 years ago when the Transport Minister was observed riding in a limousine up to 132 km/h on Autoroute 40 (I believe a segment posted 100) -> https://translate.google.ca/translat...ml&prev=search
Earlier (1970's), Quebec Premier Rene Levesque was driving himself (before the limo became mandatory) and ran over someone in suspicious circumstances (it was thought Levesque was drunk, but the test was only administered many hours after the incident)

Probably the last time we heard of a poltician driving himself in Canada was former Toronto mayor Rob Ford while doing crack in his Escalade
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Old November 5th, 2015, 03:04 AM   #3525
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Originally Posted by NFZANMNIM View Post
we were once stopped on the way from Toronto to Ottawa near Kingston on 401 for doing 116 km/h
So it is, although rarely, strictly reinforced. Especially on long weekends. (The time we got fined was the Canada day long weekend)
That is rather surprising. It's underheard of to see anyone get stopped at 116. My understanding has been that you are never going to get stopped for going up to 120 km/h. They will only ever stop you if you go above 120 km/h, and even then you are unlikely to get stopped at 125 km/h. After 125 it starts getting riskier.

Whenever I see a cop, I brake or let go off gas and set the cruise to 118 km/h. Never been stopped at that speed ever. Chatham-Kent area is notorious for OPP and I've drove right in front of cops between 118-125 many times.
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Old November 5th, 2015, 03:15 AM   #3526
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Speaking of construction on the 401, a ~6km stretch in Cambridge between Highway 8 and Hespler Rd is getting widened for 6 to 10 lanes. They started working in June and it's supposed to be done in summer 2019. Does anybody know why it would taking such a ridiculously long time for only a 6km stretch of the highway?

In other news, a further 2km extension in Windsor might open some time this year: http://windsorstar.com/news/local-ne...y-construction
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Old November 5th, 2015, 03:15 AM   #3527
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Yeah, 116 seems crazy to me. Maybe a Quebec license plate thing?

I've logged an awful lot of miles along freeways in Ontario, and have had very few run ins with law enforcement anywhere in Ontario.

I'd be far more upset with the 100km/h limit in Ontario if the OPP was actually taking steps to enforce it.

On another note, Hwy 7 between Peterborough and Carleton Place is a road that needs to have its speed limit upped. It's a very rural road that is well built and is signed as the Trans-Canada. In my opinion it should be posted at 90kh/h.
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Old November 5th, 2015, 03:20 AM   #3528
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I would probably get verbally abusive if I got pulled over at less than 120
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Old November 5th, 2015, 09:54 PM   #3529
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Herb Gray Parkway's final section to open within a couple weeks

Within the next couple weeks the final four-kilometre stretch of the $1.4-billion Herb Gray Parkway will open to traffic, finally ending all road construction under the new Highway 401 extension that will soon reach the city’s west end in Brighton Beach.

(...)

MTO officials overseeing parkway construction said Wednesday the final stretch between Labelle and Ojibway Parkway will be open before the end of November.

(...)

Once the final stretch opens later this month, the parkway — or 401 extension — will dead end and force traffic to get off at the intersection of Ojibway Parkway and E.C. Row. Eventually, a bridge overpass will take traffic over top of Ojibway Parkway into the plaza of the new Gordie Howe International Bridge, which is scheduled to open in 2020.
Full report by the Windsor Star: http://windsorstar.com/news/local-ne...ection-to-open
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Old November 6th, 2015, 02:37 PM   #3530
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Ontario is the leading province in Canada (e.g. economy, population, etc.)..........yet its max speed limit is slower than British Columbia. WTF?!?!?

Last edited by Blackraven; November 6th, 2015 at 09:37 PM.
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Old November 8th, 2015, 01:38 AM   #3531
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Some updated information about the 407 East Extension in the eastern GTA. These pictures were taken on November 7, 2015

Some of the new signage has gone up on the 401. To my knowledge, this is the only new signage that has been erected for the highway:

http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_4...t_Nov15_lg.jpg
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_4...ov15_24x16.jpg


http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_4...t_Nov15_lg.jpg
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_4...ov15_24x16.jpg
The sign for the Lake Ridge Road interchange pre-dates almost all construction of the ramp itself.


Top coat asphalt has been applied to much of the future highway west of the Lake Ridge Road interchange. Lines were applied at some point earlier this week. Most of the highway is not this far advanced. These views are from just west of Sideline 14 in Pickering, and look east:

http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_4...t_lg_24x16.jpg
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_4...ov15_24x16.jpg

This view looks westerly from the Salem Road interchange:

http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_4...t_Nov15_lg.jpg
http://www.asphaltplanet.ca/ON/hwy_4...ov15_24x16.jpg

More to come...
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Old November 8th, 2015, 02:15 AM   #3532
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Well, that answers the debate of what the 407 and 412 shields would look like
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Old November 8th, 2015, 02:30 AM   #3533
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So would this affect the privately-owned section's signage in the long run, i wonder
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Old November 10th, 2015, 05:52 AM   #3534
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Quote:
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So would this affect the privately-owned section's signage in the long run, i wonder
In the long run, likely. At the end of the 99 year lease (which began in 1998, so 2097), it will return to the province or leased to another operator. Signs might change then.
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Old November 10th, 2015, 08:49 AM   #3535
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So in 82 years.. I think the chances of any of us living that long are pretty slim. God knows what Toronto and Ontario will even be like by then, 82 years ago, we were in the depths of the Great Depression, Hitler has just taken control of Germany, and the automobile was something of a fantasy for most people still.
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Old November 10th, 2015, 09:57 PM   #3536
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Saskatchewan

The Estevan Bypass is Officially Open

November 10 marks the grand opening of the Estevan Bypass. Heavy truck traffic and commuters will now have a safer and more efficient route while travelling through the Estevan area.

The 13 kilometre bypass route runs north of Estevan from the intersection of Highway 39 and Shand Road to Highway 39 west of the city.

Highway 39 serves as a part of the National Highway System that is a direct link to a major U.S. border crossing.

Since 2007, truck traffic in the area has increased by more than 90 per cent. This growth has resulted in congestion on Highway 39 through Estevan.
Full press release: http://www.saskatchewan.ca/governmen...estevan-bypass

A 90% growth of truck traffic through Estevan in eight years, wow.
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Old November 10th, 2015, 10:11 PM   #3537
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Old November 11th, 2015, 01:37 AM   #3538
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So in 82 years.. I think the chances of any of us living that long are pretty slim. God knows what Toronto and Ontario will even be like by then, 82 years ago, we were in the depths of the Great Depression, Hitler has just taken control of Germany, and the automobile was something of a fantasy for most people still.
Most people

But Toronto still had stupid traffic jams and there was still roadworks on the QEW!
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Old November 11th, 2015, 07:19 PM   #3539
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These two viaducts in Vancouver will be demolished in a $ 200 million project. They were built as an accces to a freeway from downtown to the east that was never built, so they didn't serve much purpose. Keeping them would require a costly seismic upgrade. The southern viaduct (Georgia Viaduct) carries 24,000 vehicles per day, the northern viaduct (Dunsmuir Viaduct) carries 19,000 vehicles per day. A decent six-lane urban arterial should be capable of handling that kind of traffic.

Chris:

Removal is not a dead certainty yet. It's being championed by a couple of civic politicians.

Underneath those two viaducts is a 6 lane surface street already (Expo Blvd westbound and Pacific Blvd eastbound). The viaducts handle(d) a lot of downtown-bound commuter traffic; the surface streets more destination traffic for the two stadia there (BC Place and Rogers Arena) and through traffic for the Yaletown neighbourhood. At the west end of the viaducts (the traditional shore of False Creek) is a steep embankment that would require a lengthy ramp to go from the grade of the surface streets on the False Creek flats up to the downtown street grid.

Despite our mayor's admirable goal of making Vancouver the world's greenest city, this would be a wrong-headed move. It would be difficult for these surface streets to absorb the extra capacity of the removed viaducts without creating a lengthier gridlock than we already have, and our transit system would not be getting upgraded to take care of it either.
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Old November 12th, 2015, 01:57 AM   #3540
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They are dead end highway chunks. The cost of maintaining them would far outweigh the benefits they provide.

The opening of the lands to development will provide more gdp growth than those things could ever provide.
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