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Old April 18th, 2010, 06:54 AM   #1461
Haljackey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonysnob View Post

The MTO has launched a study for the widening of the 401 between Cambridge and Guelph which suggests that an express-collector system could be constructed between the GTA West corridor and Highway 6-North. I think this is the wrong approach too. GTA west should tie into Guelph and ideally the new Highway 7 that is planned between K/W and Guelph. IF, and I say IF, the MTO/Ontario Government was smart, GTA west will not have a lot of interchanges. This will facilitate through movements well, and would not encourage sprawl through Wellington County.
I don't think a collector/express system is needed past the 407. The highway could be widened to 8 or 10 lanes with HOV lanes to the Highway 8 Interchange in Kitchener.

I have my doubts that a new freeway will get built in this region. Just look at the proposed 424. Too much opposition and the government is in enough trouble right now with the transit funding cuts and the crazy pharmacy crisis going down.

Although temporary, it could shift the Liberals out of power and thus could affect the government's intentions in regards to highways, be it for the better or worse.

Quote:
Finally, somebody had better start thinking about another east-west corridor (or two) in York Region. All east-west transportation movements across Southern Ontario must pass through the narrow tract between Lake Ontario and Lake Simcoe. Without some sound planning and foresight, this entire corridor could be gobbled up with residential subdivisions in the not to distant future.
You may get your wish. According to this map (off Wikipedia which is in no way fully accurate) a route may get pushed through the south shore of Lake Simcoe.



But like I said, I don't see any new highways getting built in the near or mid future.
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Old April 18th, 2010, 12:58 PM   #1462
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The 404 may be extended to the east side Lake Simcoe, turning east from it's originally northbound direction.
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Old April 18th, 2010, 04:38 PM   #1463
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I don't know what they are going to do with the Highway 24 corridor. The so-called 424 was included in the Places to Grow Legislation, so it would seem that our current government is pretty keen on building something.

The existing highway is shot. The pavement is gone, and the alignment is far, far too narrow. Intersection improvements were carried out at selected junctions a couple of years ago, but the road really needs capacity and safety upgrades.

It's too bad so much opposition has been encountered. Even if the MTO decided just to four lane the existing highway, it would still dump you out in Downtown Galt, which makes the existing highway _almost_ useless.

Maybe if the MTO finally got around to building the Morriston by-pass on Highway 6 some of the traffic could be diverted from Highway 24.
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Old April 18th, 2010, 08:43 PM   #1464
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...Or maybe build a new route directly to the Hamilton region. That would be far more effective because a lot of traffic using highways 6 and 24 are bound for this region. A route could be designed so that it does not go through any major towns but the alignment would cut its way through a lot of farmland and the greenbelt.

There will certainly be a lot of opposition to this route, but I don't think there will be as much compared with building the 424.
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Old April 18th, 2010, 11:46 PM   #1465
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^ So it would roughly follow Highway 8 then?

The trick to this alignment that I see is how to link it with the 401 in Cambridge and Highway 403 in Hamilton. I wouldn't mind seeing the Cambridge West by-pass brought back in, however, I think the reason that was initially killed was because the province didn't want to encourage development to the west of the Grand in Cambridge.
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Old April 19th, 2010, 01:06 AM   #1466
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The 404 may be extended to the east side Lake Simcoe, turning east from it's originally northbound direction.
It would have to! If it went any further north you'd require a causeway to cross Lake Simcoe. I'm not entirely sure what the long-term plans are for the 404 once it reaches the east shore of Lake Simcoe. Continuing north to Orillia to provide an additional access route would seem the most likely. Continuing east only takes you into rural and cottage areas which don't really need a 400-series highway right now.

The Bradfor Bypass is the connecting highway shown heading west from the 404. The northern extension of the 427 is being bogged over which regional municipality it will be built in. York counters it has the narrower crossing of the Oak Ridges Moraine, an environmentally-sensitive area, while Peel argues its routing would provide greater access to more populated areas, and thus through less farmland.

As for the proposed Mid-Peninsula expressway, I don't see why they just extend the Lincoln Alexander Parkway to Niagara as opposed to building another expressway parallel to it to the south?
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Old April 20th, 2010, 03:20 AM   #1467
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As for the proposed Mid-Peninsula expressway, I don't see why they just extend the Lincoln Alexander Parkway to Niagara as opposed to building another expressway parallel to it to the south?
I can. The Linc is rammed, and while it could be widened, it can only easily be widened to six lanes. Plus, given that it has an interchange every 1.6km, it would poorly serve long distance traffic.
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Old April 23rd, 2010, 02:55 AM   #1468
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Here's something a little different:



That's the Veterans Memorial Parkway, a 4 lane at-grade expressway in London. The road used to be two lanes and clogged with traffic for a long time. The lack of funding during the upgrade meant interchanges were not built and thus intersections remained. If you drive on it you'll see tons of skid marks on the road due to cars slamming on the breaks when a light turns red. It sucks, but it is better than it used to be.

Because today is Earth Day, a massive tree-planting project is underway along the route to "put more park in the parkway".

This route has also had 3 different names over the years (Highway 100, Airport Road, and the Veterans Memorial Parkway). I guess they couldn't make up their mind.
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Old May 3rd, 2010, 01:09 AM   #1469
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Went for a drive today and got some pics of the Trans Canada Highway at the east end of Kamloops. The highway is not motorway here, though there are some grade separated intersections.

The pic is on the dark side, because of the clouds.


Near the city limit, which is 3 KM down the highway at the HWY 1/97 junction.
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Old May 9th, 2010, 12:26 AM   #1470
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonysnob View Post
^ Very thorough list.

I have just a few observations about what I am seeing currently.

I really don't like the fact that the QEW through Halton Region is only seeing one additional HOV lane per direction added. Given the complexity of the construction that is ongoing, I think the cross-section should have been widened to 8+2. That doesn't really fall in line with the province's TDM objectives, but I think the general taxpayer would be better served with an additional general purpose lane in each direction.

The MTO has launched a study for the widening of the 401 between Cambridge and Guelph which suggests that an express-collector system could be constructed between the GTA West corridor and Highway 6-North. I think this is the wrong approach too. GTA west should tie into Guelph and ideally the new Highway 7 that is planned between K/W and Guelph. IF, and I say IF, the MTO/Ontario Government was smart, GTA west will not have a lot of interchanges. This will facilitate through movements well, and would not encourage sprawl through Wellington County.

Finally, somebody had better start thinking about another east-west corridor (or two) in York Region. All east-west transportation movements across Southern Ontario must pass through the narrow tract between Lake Ontario and Lake Simcoe. Without some sound planning and foresight, this entire corridor could be gobbled up with residential subdivisions in the not to distant future.
I could never see the whole area between Lake Simcoe and Lake Ontario being completely urbanized. Huge tracts of land in that area are already off limits to development. Oak Ridges Moraine protection, the Greenbelt. The area we have to be concerned with is the western shore of Lake Simcoe. That area is outside of the Greenbelt, and can be developed. The province has already approved development of employment lands along the 400 in Innisfil.

If the province was smart they would construct more highways and transit to connect Halton with the surrounding areas, Kitchener, Guelph, Hamilton, Toronto. Currently the population is around 450 000 and in the next 25 years is expected to close to double in population. Milton currently has a population of 75 000, and only 10 years ago had 30 000, is expected to by the time it is full build out will have a population of 300 000. Growth is for the most part being concentrated in the western part of the GTA and the northern part. Very little growth is occurring in the east.

Even though the province has all these grandiose plans, I do not see much of it actually being built unless we start to get some more money from the feds, and by that I mean they start taking less from us.
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Old May 9th, 2010, 11:14 PM   #1471
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post deleted. See below post.

Last edited by Haljackey; May 11th, 2010 at 02:57 AM.
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Old May 10th, 2010, 12:33 AM   #1472
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bartolo View Post
I could never see the whole area between Lake Simcoe and Lake Ontario being completely urbanized. Huge tracts of land in that area are already off limits to development. Oak Ridges Moraine protection, the Greenbelt. The area we have to be concerned with is the western shore of Lake Simcoe. That area is outside of the Greenbelt, and can be developed. The province has already approved development of employment lands along the 400 in Innisfil.

If the province was smart they would construct more highways and transit to connect Halton with the surrounding areas, Kitchener, Guelph, Hamilton, Toronto. Currently the population is around 450 000 and in the next 25 years is expected to close to double in population. Milton currently has a population of 75 000, and only 10 years ago had 30 000, is expected to by the time it is full build out will have a population of 300 000. Growth is for the most part being concentrated in the western part of the GTA and the northern part. Very little growth is occurring in the east.

Even though the province has all these grandiose plans, I do not see much of it actually being built unless we start to get some more money from the feds, and by that I mean they start taking less from us.
The greenbelt covers much of the uninhabited portions of the GTA, but doesn't address anything in the Yonge Street corridor. You are right, if the Bradford By-pass were to be built, it would do a lot for east-west movements, further it would provide redundancy between the 400 and 404 which would be great. However, the Bradford By-pass is a long way north of the 407.

It would be nice to see SOMETHING built. It seems like not a lot is getting done in terms of new highways in the southern part of the province.
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Old May 11th, 2010, 02:58 AM   #1473
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Went to Toronto for a day trip on Saturday from London. It was a crappy day but I got some pictures. I thought I may as well share them here with you.

Hilly section


Construction between Woodstock and Kitchener, widening the highway from 4 to 6 lanes:


Pedestrian overpass in Kitchener. Further downhill is the bridge over the Grand River which is visible in this photo.


Here's two shots of some construction along Highway 401 in Mississauga. When complete, the road will be widened from 6 to 12 lanes, and have a collector/express system west of Highway 403 and 410. The interchange with Hurontario Street will also be reconstructed as part of the project.





On Highway 427 now heading to the Gardiner Expressway.


Looking at the CN Tower as we exit the Gardiner onto Spadina Avenue.
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Old May 12th, 2010, 05:11 AM   #1474
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^ You know, I think that one of the best things that the MTO has done in recent years is paint orange lane markings through construction zones. That really helps reduce the ambiguity that sometimes happens between the scrapped off permanent lane markings and temporary markings.

I read an article by Jim Kenzie wrote an article championing the orange lines a few years ago in the star. If my foggy memory serves me, he said that Ontario's orange lane markings were a first in North America, but have been used in European jurisdictions in the past.
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Old May 12th, 2010, 06:39 PM   #1475
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonysnob View Post
^ You know, I think that one of the best things that the MTO has done in recent years is paint orange lane markings through construction zones. That really helps reduce the ambiguity that sometimes happens between the scrapped off permanent lane markings and temporary markings.

I read an article by Jim Kenzie wrote an article championing the orange lines a few years ago in the star. If my foggy memory serves me, he said that Ontario's orange lane markings were a first in North America, but have been used in European jurisdictions in the past.
If I recall correctly, Spain uses yellow lines in construction zones, but France and most of the rest of continental Europe uses orange.

I think it makes drivers more aware they're in a construction zone, and will actually slow down and be more cautious in them.

When we were going through the construction between Woodstock and Kitchener, the speed limit was 80, but everyone was doing at least 110. There are no orange lines there.
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Old May 15th, 2010, 06:55 AM   #1476
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I, for one, think that this is a great idea. Roundabouts keep things moving in cities while intersections clog things up. With Halifax's peak hours congestion on Robie and Quinpool, I think this is a great idea.

http://www.metronews.ca/halifax/loca...outs-tentative
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Old May 16th, 2010, 03:20 AM   #1477
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Nice shots, Chris. You left out Halifax :P.

I took the liberty to make one myself.

Yellow = divided highway (the 107 is the only non-divided highway on this map)
Pink = trunk road (denoted by shield and single-digit number) or NS Route.

This is an old thread -- but it occurs to me that Halifax has quite a substantial freeway network for a city of its size. If I am not mistaken, Halifax is about the same size as London Ontario (sorry, Ontario is my frame of reference), and London doesn't have have the roads that Halifax does.

I went to Halifax for a couple of days back in 2006. It was really foggy the entire time I was there, otherwise I would have been photographing away as per usual. Shame.
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Old May 16th, 2010, 03:32 AM   #1478
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonysnob View Post
This is an old thread -- but it occurs to me that Halifax has quite a substantial freeway network for a city of its size. If I am not mistaken, Halifax is about the same size as London Ontario (sorry, Ontario is my frame of reference), and London doesn't have have the roads that Halifax does.

I went to Halifax for a couple of days back in 2006. It was really foggy the entire time I was there, otherwise I would have been photographing away as per usual. Shame.
It does have a rather large network for its size. I think a large reason is because it is very spread out and also because of where it is located, around a bay.
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Old May 16th, 2010, 04:36 AM   #1479
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^ It's network could also be more on the minds of governments and policy makers seeing as Halifax is by far Nova Scotia's largest centre.

On another note, Ontario has been experimenting with clearview font of late, and I put together a little bit of a comparison here. I am putting up both the highway gothic and clearview versions of each sign.

Diagram:



Advanced:



Exit:



Thoughts?
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Old May 16th, 2010, 06:55 AM   #1480
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Quote:
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Exit:


Thoughts?
I never did like the crown on the westbound 403 (Hamilton/Brantford) which is used on some of the newer signs. Strangely they switched it back when they put up the Clearview signs. I don't know, they're kinda boxy and just look "wrong" compared to the more rounded (more like a slice of bread ) older crowns.

As for Clearview vs. Highway Gothic, personally I don't really notice a difference in legibility. I notice the difference in fonts, but they both read clearly.
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