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Old July 9th, 2010, 05:04 AM   #1581
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haljackey View Post
Here's a new road video of mine. It shows the Highbury extension, Highway 401 and 402 in London, Ontario.



Link for HD and info: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFXvbx8bnTE

Hope you enjoy it!
Nice video. I'll hopefully upload a few new videos of mine during the weekend as well.
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Old July 9th, 2010, 07:13 AM   #1582
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HELP!

Can someone point me in the right direction.

I've been looking for information about the 401 & HWY 10 In the Mississauga area.

I cant find NOTTA Nothing. Yet there is this massive construction going on right now. Very strange, it almost looks like another hwy being built right beside the 401.

I'm confused and tired of looking help..
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Old July 9th, 2010, 09:36 PM   #1583
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Glad you enjoyed it TheCat!


Ravager: I think the 401 is getting it's collector / express system extended from Highway 410 to Highway 10. That's why it looks as though a new highway is being built to the side.

Image of the new 401/10 intersection:




Link to a dedicated thread about it on Urban Toronto: 401/Hurontario Reconstruction Starts Sept 2009: http://urbantoronto.ca/showthread.ph...hlight=highway
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Old July 9th, 2010, 10:00 PM   #1584
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Will the addition of collector lanes mean Kennedy will go from an overpass to an underpass crossing the 401? It certainly looks that way on the schematic compared to how they've shown McLaughlin crossing over the 401. I'm surprised the project doesn't include completing the interchange between the 401 and 403. Two ramps to allow east to south and north to west are required. The latter already roughed in and in use (you can see the tire treads from those who've tried and probably have off-roading capabilities) to a certain degree.

Also, a bit off topic, but still pertaining to roads, they've shown the original allignment of Britannia Rd. There have been a few calls for the two segments on either side of the 410/401 to be reconnected as right now a detour to either Matheson or Courtneypark is required. Hazel's said that if demand requires it the City would look into it. I guess it's not right now, but what would such a connection look like?
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Old July 10th, 2010, 12:26 AM   #1585
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Thanks!

Finally some info! Interesting to say the least.
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Old July 10th, 2010, 06:24 PM   #1586
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Ravager: No problem, you're welcome!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Gil View Post
Will the addition of collector lanes mean Kennedy will go from an overpass to an underpass crossing the 401? It certainly looks that way on the schematic compared to how they've shown McLaughlin crossing over the 401. I'm surprised the project doesn't include completing the interchange between the 401 and 403. Two ramps to allow east to south and north to west are required. The latter already roughed in and in use (you can see the tire treads from those who've tried and probably have off-roading capabilities) to a certain degree.
Regarding the 401 / 403 / 410 junction, if nothing is being done on it for this project, I am going to assume nothing will ever be done. Why? I expect the province thinks very few or no cars will ever use these connections. (What's the point of going from the 401 east to the 403 west? That sign would confuse the heck out of drivers!) I could see it being of some use for the people that want to access the junctions the 403 has along it's north / south route, but I guess that's not enough to warrant construction.

Constructing the 401-403 ramp would be pretty simple as it's straight and land's available, but the connection from the 410-401 will be more challenging. A flyover would be crazy expensive and make the interchange an additional level higher, becoming a huge NIMBY to local residents. A loop ramp would work better because it's lower capacity and low traffic volumes are expected to use it, but it may require extending some of the overpasses / flyovers depending on where it's built. (Such as the 401-410 flyover.)

But like I said, in all honesty, I doubt it will ever happen if it isn't built with this collector / express extension project.
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Old July 10th, 2010, 07:53 PM   #1587
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^ They'll built it. If you look really closely at the schematic of the project that Hal has posted, you can see a ramp stub that will be constructed which will eventually be linked to Highway 403-West. Apparently all of the 401 signs will reference the ramp to the 403 as well, but will be covered with an overlay for just the 410 until the ramp is actually built.

Further, if you look closely at the westbound collector lane overpass over the 410, you will notice the northeast side of the structure is flared out to accept the taper from a loop ramp.

You can see it here:
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...05681&t=h&z=18

I have no idea when the ramps will actually be built. I think the Dixie Road interchange is pretty much at capacity already, so the additional ramps to the 403 would allow eastbound traffic to access the Industrial area via Eglington or Cawthra -- which would be pretty useful.

It would stand to reason that the 410 will be widened in the next decade or so, it wouldn't shock me to see the ramps added at that point.

Consider if HOV lanes are built on the 410, a direct link could be conceived between the 403 and 410 HOV lanes -- and maybe, if the MTO was feeling really crazy, between the HOV lanes on the 401 as well.

Big things coming.

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Old July 11th, 2010, 07:27 PM   #1588
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It's so nice to look at a city with a highway system.
Are they going to widen the 401 from Kitchener to Toronto to 8 lanes anytime soon?
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Old July 11th, 2010, 09:43 PM   #1589
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I have a question. What is the role of Translink in the lower mainland? Is it operated on behalf of a regional government? The Golden Ear's bridge is a Translink Highway, no? And is it true that Highway 1A (the old Fraser Highway) is no longer signed? Is that now under Translink's jurisdiction as well?

edit
And for the 401, there are a number of studies ongoing right now trying to figure out what to do with Highway 401 between Mississauga and Kitchener, but its sort of up in the air right now. It wouldn't shock me to see eight lanes between Mississauga (407) and Milton in the semi-near term. Likewise, eight (or even 10) lanes in Kitchener/Cambridge are due once the Highway 8 improvements are completed, but I think any further widening between Waterloo and Halton are probably more than a decade out.
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Last edited by sonysnob; July 11th, 2010 at 09:46 PM. Reason: added text.
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Old July 12th, 2010, 04:16 AM   #1590
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I'm going to be driving from Toronto to Saint John NB later this summer. Can anyone who knows tell me if it's better to drive past Quebec City and into NB, or should I go south at Montreal and go through Maine? The US route seems faster to me, but I don't want to miss something I should see by bypassing Quebec east of Montreal (which I think I prefer to do anyway).
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Old July 12th, 2010, 04:45 AM   #1591
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marbur66 View Post
I'm going to be driving from Toronto to Saint John NB later this summer. Can anyone who knows tell me if it's better to drive past Quebec City and into NB, or should I go south at Montreal and go through Maine? The US route seems faster to me, but I don't want to miss something I should see by bypassing Quebec east of Montreal (which I think I prefer to do anyway).
Go through Quebec City, its a lot faster... given that the NB portion of trans canada is complete. I've driven from Hamilton to Fredericton in 15 hours and went through Montreal and Quebec City. The amount of added drive time to go south to the US is pointless.
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Old July 12th, 2010, 12:04 PM   #1592
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Originally Posted by sonysnob View Post
^ They'll built it. If you look really closely at the schematic of the project that Hal has posted, you can see a ramp stub that will be constructed which will eventually be linked to Highway 403-West. Apparently all of the 401 signs will reference the ramp to the 403 as well, but will be covered with an overlay for just the 410 until the ramp is actually built.

Further, if you look closely at the westbound collector lane overpass over the 410, you will notice the northeast side of the structure is flared out to accept the taper from a loop ramp.

You can see it here:
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sour...05681&t=h&z=18

I have no idea when the ramps will actually be built. I think the Dixie Road interchange is pretty much at capacity already, so the additional ramps to the 403 would allow eastbound traffic to access the Industrial area via Eglington or Cawthra -- which would be pretty useful.

It would stand to reason that the 410 will be widened in the next decade or so, it wouldn't shock me to see the ramps added at that point.

Consider if HOV lanes are built on the 410, a direct link could be conceived between the 403 and 410 HOV lanes -- and maybe, if the MTO was feeling really crazy, between the HOV lanes on the 401 as well.

Big things coming.

Please don't mind my confusion but is that picture from 403 westbound? The reason I ask is because in 2004 we were going from Niagara to Windsor but instead somehow got onto 401 east from 403/QEW and ended up in Mississauga. Me along with my whole family were looking for overhead signs and none of us remember seeing any signs for 401 west.
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Old July 12th, 2010, 02:39 PM   #1593
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^ This sign is southbound on Highway 410 approaching Highway 403/401. You can't get to the 401 West directly from Highway 403 in Mississauga. I take it you missed the loop ramp in Burlington.

Just one note for about the drive to St. John as well. Driving through Maine is probably really, really beautiful, but I bet it is also really, really slow.

Cheers.
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Old July 12th, 2010, 02:53 PM   #1594
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonysnob View Post
^ This sign is southbound on Highway 410 approaching Highway 403/401. You can't get to the 401 West directly from Highway 403 in Mississauga. I take it you missed the loop ramp in Burlington.

Just one note for about the drive to St. John as well. Driving through Maine is probably really, really beautiful, but I bet it is also really, really slow.

Cheers.
Maine isn't slow , theres no up there. It gets congested down by Portland though.
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Old July 12th, 2010, 02:56 PM   #1595
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Originally Posted by sonysnob View Post
Just one note for about the drive to St. John as well. Driving through Maine is probably really, really beautiful, but I bet it is also really, really slow.
That was my reaction too: I once drove from Quebec City to Camden, Maine, using...hmmm...[pause to consult maps]...Autoroute 73, then highways 173, 204 and 161 to Maine 27. I see that staying on 173 to US 201 would have been more direct - I'm guessing I wanted to stay in Quebec as long as possible. And I do like a good quiet backroad drive.

This was 1990, but I'm not sure Maine 27 was even paved close to the border. Think gravel.

I'm in the realm of speculation here, but I'm visualing US 201 as a two-lane road with lots of paper-company truck traffic. Could be annoying.

But as I started to say, that was my reaction until I saw the bit about turning south at Montreal. So is Marbur66 talking about sticking to expressways (I-89, I-93, NH 101 I suppose, I-95)? Might be worthwhile if the goal is to save time.
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Old July 12th, 2010, 02:57 PM   #1596
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^ I was thinking that US-2 would be slow, simply because its a mountain road, and its not a freeway.

It'd be a long way to take I-91/93 all the way down to I-95 going from Montreal to St. John, NB.
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Old July 15th, 2010, 01:08 AM   #1597
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sonysnob View Post
I have a question. What is the role of Translink in the lower mainland? Is it operated on behalf of a regional government? The Golden Ear's bridge is a Translink Highway, no? And is it true that Highway 1A (the old Fraser Highway) is no longer signed? Is that now under Translink's jurisdiction as well?
Translink, or the Greater Vancouver Transportation Authority, is operated by Metro Vancouver representing all of the regional municipalities.

During the late 1990's many of the region's older secondary arterial highways were downloaded onto Translink's jurisdiction - eg. Hwy 99A (King George Highway), Pattullo Bridge, Hwy 1A (Fraser Hwy), Hwy 7 (Lougheed Hwy - a portion).

And Yes, the Golden Ears Crossing and Connector project was built under Translink's jurisdiction. Frankly, it should have been an MoT project IMHO. And the future $1 billion Pattullo Bridge project will also be constructed under Translink's jurisdiction.

Translink also provides cost-shared funding for the region's "major road network" outside of provincial jurisdiction.

http://www.translink.ca/~/media/Docu...ork%20Map.ashx
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Old July 16th, 2010, 05:28 AM   #1598
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Technical question...

Does anybody here understand the rational for random joint spacing on concrete roadways? In Ontario, MTO stipulates that joints are to be spaced randomly at 3.7, 4.0, 4.3, 4.5 m intervals. I understand the need for regular joints in concrete slabs to accommodate the freeze/thaw cycle, but the spacing differentials I don't understand. Is is it just ride quality?
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Old July 16th, 2010, 07:48 AM   #1599
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Is this some sort of roundabout way of getting the 407 into government hands? Courtesy of CTV Toronto.

CPP may take ownership stake in toll Hwy. 407


An aerial view of the intersections of Highways 404 and 407 in Markham. (Tom Podolec/CTV Toronto)

Updated: Thu Jul. 15 2010 5:21:59 PM
The Canadian Press

TORONTO — Ontario's busy Highway 407 Express Toll Route could soon have another Canadian owner after one of the country's largest pension funds bid on the Australian firm that owns a 30 per cent stake in the highway.

The Canada Pension Plan Investment Board has made a non-binding $3.2-billion proposal to acquire Australia's Intoll Group (ASX:ITO), an offer that implies an enterprise value for the company of A$5.1 billion, including debt assumed by the pension plan.

The pension fund is particularly interested in holding the assets of a Canadian toll operator, and believes its familiarity with the country's traffic patterns, GDP growth, and population growth will make it a good fit.

"The asset being in Canada was obviously an advantage for us," Andre Bourbonnais, senior vice-president of private investments for the fund manager, said in an interview Thursday.

Intoll also owns a 25 per cent stake in Sydney, Australia's Westlink M7 toll highway.

CPPIB likes infrastructure assets because they have a predictable cash flow, offer inflation protection and are easy to maintain, Bourbonnais said. The board set up an infrastructure research group to examine potential opportunities in 2005.

"Toll roads were identified fairly early in our strategy discussion as an interesting asset that met all the characteristics," Bourbonnais explained.

"The 407 and M7 came out on our radar screen."

The conditional offer marks the Toronto-based fund manager's second attempt to purchase an Australian toll road operator, following a failed C$3.8-billion bid by the fund and its partners to take over Transurban Group (ASX:TCL) in May.

That bidding group also included the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan and Sydney-based CP2 Ltd., which together held 40 per cent of Transurban's securities.

While Teachers has dumped the majority of its shares in Transurban since then, CPPIB has held onto its 13 per cent stake.

Bourbonnais said that despite its recent acquisition attempts, the fund isn't specifically targeting Australian toll road companies.

"There's certain jurisdictions that are easier for private ownership of infrastructure assets ... Australia happens to be one of them," he said.

CPPIB's offer includes C$1.186 cash and 23 Australian cents for each share, which represents a 38 per cent premium over Intoll's closing price on Monday and a 41.7 per cent premium on the average price for the preceding month.

It also offers an "unlisted rollover alternative" that allows Intoll shareholders to retain all or part of their current interest in the company.

The proposed transaction is subject to completion of due diligence and requires Intoll directors to unanimously recommend shareholders vote in favour of the deal in the absence of a superior transaction. CPPIB expects to make a formal bid in a matter of weeks.

However, the fund manager was reluctant to say whether it would raise its offer if other competing bids emerged, as it did several times after Transurban's rejections.

"Past transactions, especially in Australia, have demonstrated that we are a very disciplined bidder. We have done our analysis we put a proposal on the table that clearly in our mind fully values the asset," Bourbonnais said.

"If it works, it works. If it doesn't, we look for another asset."

Intoll was spun off from Aussie fund management giant Macquarie Group to manage the Canadian and Australian toll road assets. If the acquisition is successful, it would become CPPIB's largest single investment.

Infrastructure currently makes up under 10 per cent of the CPPIB's assets, but Bourbonnais said the board continues to scour the world for opportunities to expand its infrastructure portfolio.

The bid is good news for Montreal-based engineering company SNC-Lavalin (TSX:SNC) because it would boost the value of its 16.77 per cent stake in the toll road.

Desjardins Securities analyst Pierre Lacroix upgraded his target price for SNC-Lavalin to $59 from $57, while shares in SNC-Lavalin gained 77 cents to $45.30 Thursday on the Toronto Stock Exchange.

The transaction implies a $10.50-per-share value for SNC's stake in Highway 407, up from Lacroix's previous estimate of $8.50.

Highway 407 stretches 108 kilometres from the Queen Elizabeth Way near Burlington on a northeastern path that skirts Toronto and reaches Pickering in the east.

The highway has become an important part of the province's system for moving goods and people from its industrial heartland in the Toronto area to the U.S. border near Niagara Falls.

It is one of Ontario's few privately owned highways and the only toll highway in Canada that operates electronically and without any collection booths.

The remaining 53 per cent stake in the 407 highway company is owned by Spain's Ferrovial.

407 International Inc., the consortium that owns the highway, announced improved second quarter results Thursday, with earnings more than four times what they were in the year-earlier period.

The company reported net income of $33.6 million compared with $8 million for the same period of 2009. Revenues were $162 million, up from $142.1 million last year.

About 29.8 million drivers travelled the highway during the second quarter, compared to 28.2 million last year. Nearly 400,000 used the highway on an average workday during the quarter.

The CPPIB is a professional investment management organization that invests the funds not needed by the Canada Pension Plan to pay current benefits on behalf of 17 million Canadian contributors and beneficiaries.

In order to build a diversified portfolio, the CPPIB invests in public equities, private equities, real estate, inflation-linked bonds, infrastructure and fixed-income instruments.

Many Canadian pension funds have invested heavily in infrastructure such as airports, power plants and ports around the world.
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Old July 17th, 2010, 04:10 PM   #1600
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Here's basically all of Nova Scotia's Highway 102 from Halifax to Truro.

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