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Old November 25th, 2010, 02:41 PM   #1841
Bartolo
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCat View Post
Though, in the case of the Trans-Canada, Ontario also has a long way to go. Apparently some sections of Highway 17 and Highway 11 are very dangerous (I think that's pretty close to the border with Manitoba, and also has to do with the terrain). There was a discussion about this a few years back on this forum.

I think together, ON and MB are the missing link in the TCH, although of course, the traffic levels probably do not warrant a significant expansion at this time.
I drove that section you are talking about this summer at night in the rain, and it was a very scary experience to say the least.
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Old November 25th, 2010, 05:27 PM   #1842
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheCat View Post
Though, in the case of the Trans-Canada, Ontario also has a long way to go. Apparently some sections of Highway 17 and Highway 11 are very dangerous (I think that's pretty close to the border with Manitoba, and also has to do with the terrain). There was a discussion about this a few years back on this forum.

I think together, ON and MB are the missing link in the TCH, although of course, the traffic levels probably do not warrant a significant expansion at this time.
I've always wanted to see the Trans-Canada twinned and signed as Highway 1 for it's entire route in Canada. Twinning doesn't mean it needs to be a freeway like the US Interstates, but dividing the highway makes it much safer and a more pleasant drive as you travel through this vast, vast land.

Although I would make an exception for the route in northern Ontario. This stretch is so desolate that twinning it doesn't make a of of sense. Perhaps this section could be renamed another Highway and the Trans Canada would continue towards Sudbury and use Highway 69/400 to hook up back with Highway 17/417. Just some ideas.
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Old November 25th, 2010, 06:32 PM   #1843
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haljackey View Post
I've always wanted to see the Trans-Canada twinned and signed as Highway 1 for it's entire route in Canada. Twinning doesn't mean it needs to be a freeway like the US Interstates, but dividing the highway makes it much safer and a more pleasant drive as you travel through this vast, vast land.
Seconded on the twinning part. And, I'd also like to see some major tunnels constructed to substantially straighten, as well as shorten the distance on has to drive now. Too bad no one in at any level of Govt. has the balls to even discuss it.
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Old November 26th, 2010, 09:41 AM   #1844
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haljackey View Post
I've always wanted to see the Trans-Canada twinned and signed as Highway 1 for it's entire route in Canada. Twinning doesn't mean it needs to be a freeway like the US Interstates, but dividing the highway makes it much safer and a more pleasant drive as you travel through this vast, vast land.
You're right about the TCH needing consistent numbering I've wondered why doesn't Canada have a true national highway system? You mentioned in an earlier post that Interstates were federally maintained, they're mostly funded federally, but states are responsible for carrying out maintenance. Even given the current way Canada handles its roads you could still number important highways the same across provinces.
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Old November 28th, 2010, 11:00 PM   #1845
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Take a tour of Ontario's Highway 35:

1.


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11.


12.
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Old November 29th, 2010, 03:17 AM   #1846
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Damn Ontario's highways continue to impress me... and put BC's highways to shame
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Old November 29th, 2010, 06:33 PM   #1847
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Nice pictures. Shows that Canada isn't all frozen tundra in the north.
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Old November 30th, 2010, 08:25 PM   #1848
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Quote:
Originally Posted by urbanlover View Post
You're right about the TCH needing consistent numbering I've wondered why doesn't Canada have a true national highway system? You mentioned in an earlier post that Interstates were federally maintained, they're mostly funded federally, but states are responsible for carrying out maintenance. Even given the current way Canada handles its roads you could still number important highways the same across provinces.
I wonder that too. But most Canadians don't seem to understand that concept, even though I've tried to argue the point:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:British_Columbia_Highway_1
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Old December 1st, 2010, 12:37 AM   #1849
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Link fail. I fixed it.
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Old December 4th, 2010, 09:08 AM   #1850
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Electronic signs in Ontario, Canada:





Old style:


New style:


yay colour!
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Old December 4th, 2010, 07:16 PM   #1851
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'Need for speed' creates havoc on 401

By LARRY CORNIES of the London Free Press

Highway 401 Widening complete between Woodstock and K-W (6 lanes from 402 to 410)

A very interesting read. I've always hated traveling on the 401 between Woodstock and K-W. With the new 6-lane facility now open with a concrete median, it should be a more pleasurable drive for motorists (although still quite
boring).

Link: http://www.lfpress.com/comment/2010/12/03/16421491.html

Construction zone along Highway 401 in May 2010




WOODSTOCK - Over the past four weeks, they've gradually disappeared: the dump trucks, graders, pavers and stripers. Except for a few crowning touches that will wait until spring, the massive construction project on a 20-kilometre stretch of Hwy. 401 just east of Woodstock is finally finished.

The initiative has taken more than two years and cost millions. But like a giant angioplasty, it has opened the thoroughfare to at least three lanes in each direction along a continuous stretch from the terminus of Hwy. 402 in south London to just east of Toronto.

Completion of the road widening and its now-continuous concrete barrier is a welcome relief to anyone who must travel that stretch frequently. The 401, which on a typical weekday resembles a fast-moving warehouse more than an auto route, is a freeway in constant search of its own limits.

Occasionally, those limits become all too apparent. Such was the case in the early 1990s. As just-in-time delivery became standard practice in the manufacturing and logistics industries, traffic on the highway, especially trucks lugging 53-foot trailers, grew at an astonishing rate.

Those dramatic increases in traffic flow combined with the highway's narrow, open medians to produce a death toll that was nearly unprecedented. Median crossovers were a particular problem and caused dozens of deaths, especially in the stretch between Woodstock and London. Newspaper editorials and letter writers railed against the increasingly dangerous conditions. The province accelerated its improvement plans.

As the scope of the problem became increasingly clear, the province's Transportation Ministry installed rumble strips and erected a permanent concrete barrier along the especially troublesome section, where the grassy median in some places was as narrow as nine metres.

On the newly completed section, the median (already 15 metres wide) wasn't so much the problem as was capacity, according to Michael Swim, an engineer in the Ministry of Transportation's highway planning and design team for West Region. Spurred by industrial growth along the 401 corridor in Oxford and Middlesex counties, the freeway was dealing with "capacity issues" that required additional lanes to reduce "rear-enders and sideswipes," he says.

There are limits, however, to what engineers can do to protect us from ourselves.

As a piece of utilitarian infrastructure, Hwy. 401 works well. The most significant remaining variable in the complex mathematical formula that defines motoring safety on the country's busiest thoroughfare is speed. In short, we're addicted to it.

Never mind the hand-held talkers and texters, who appear unfazed by recent regulations to stem their distraction. Forget the measures intended to impose a maximum speed on trucks at 105 km/h through the use of limiters. It's still the issue of speed, often combined with aggressive driving, that's the major danger out there.

The problem of speed is, in fact, two-fold. First, the posted 100-km/h limit has been rendered meaningless. Observe that limit strictly, even in the right-hand lane, and you become a moving hazard. Even police vehicles on routine business far exceed the posted limit, which seems to serve only the purpose of increasing fines and demerit-point losses when speeders are tagged with going, say, 130 km/h - which may be 30 over the limit but only 10 or 15 above the rate at which traffic is actually moving.

The second aspect of the speed problem is uniformity of movement. On the wildest of days, there can be a 40-km/h (or more) differential between the slowest and fastest motorists on the highway. That disparity leads to aggressive driving and lane changes that wouldn't occur if everyone observed more uniform speeds.

What enforcement of speed limits does exist appears to be checkered: Along the Windsor-Toronto corridor, speed traps are more common in Waterloo Region, Oxford County and Chatham-Kent, for example, than in Essex, Elgin and Middlesex counties.

To mangle some Shakespeare: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in the highway, but in ourselves. While roadway engineers continue to deal with the daunting problem of keeping up with capacity, the biggest remaining step we can take to make the 401 a less intimidating beast would be to address the speed issue unambiguously.

That means a maximum speed of 110 and zero tolerance for those who exceed it. Many U.S. states apply the zero-tolerance rule; there's no reason we can't.

Those measures would accomplish at least as much as the perennial reconstruction we're tempted to believe is the ultimate answer.
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Old December 7th, 2010, 07:46 AM   #1852
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I wouldn't mind zero-tolerance only if the speed limit were 120 km/h (which is, in my opinion, the best speed limit for the 400-series). Most of the time, 110 km/h is still slower than the flow of traffic.
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Old December 7th, 2010, 09:12 PM   #1853
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I wouldn't mind zero-tolerance only if the speed limit were 120 km/h (which is, in my opinion, the best speed limit for the 400-series). Most of the time, 110 km/h is still slower than the flow of traffic.
agreed... maybe even 130
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Old December 7th, 2010, 09:30 PM   #1854
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I think that 130 km/h might actually be pushing it a bit, since our maintenance standards aren't as high as most of the European countries where the speed limit is 130 km/h or above (the German autobahn, ironically, might sometimes be the exception). The overall quality of the 400-series is quite good, and regular maintenance is being done, but I do experience bumpy/uneven conditions inside the Toronto area quite frequently. It's usually not terrible, but it's technically something that should not ideally be found on high speed roads.

Mind you, I frequently reach (and sometimes exceed) 130 km/h, but usually only in certain stretches and in light traffic. I cruise at around 120 km/h in good conditions.

But I think that 120 km/h is a very good and optimal speed limit for our freeways, taking road conditions into account. This is the speed limit in a number of countries in Europe and elsewhere, including the Netherlands, which has excellent roads.
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Old December 7th, 2010, 09:45 PM   #1855
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120 - 130 is the most common speed limit in Europe.

However, several countries recently increased, or is planning to increase the speed limit, for example in the Netherlands, Denmark, Poland and Sweden.
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Old December 7th, 2010, 11:40 PM   #1856
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120 - 130 is the most common speed limit in Europe.

However, several countries recently increased, or is planning to increase the speed limit, for example in the Netherlands, Denmark, Poland and Sweden.
What are the Netherlands and Poland going to increase the speed limit too? 130?.

In Denmark and Sweden the increase is to 120?
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Old December 8th, 2010, 12:09 AM   #1857
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Slightly off-topic, but;

Netherlands 120 -> 130
Poland 130 -> 140
Denmark 110 -> 130
Sweden 110 -> 120
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Old December 8th, 2010, 02:36 AM   #1858
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Most of the sections of the 400-Series highways have a design speed of 130km/h. That's why most people want to drive close to this speed. Posting it 30km/h below is not just too slow, it's almost dangerous.


--------------------------------------------------------------


Anyways, I'm not sure if many of you know what's been going on in London, Ontario, but we've received about 100cm of snow. The city is practically shut down.

I took this video of Highway 402 and 401 eastbound on Friday, December 3, just as the snowfall was beginning. The system lingered Saturday and intensified Sunday, dumping massive amounts of snow on the area mostly through 'snow squalls'.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHNKzl9uV3A


On Sunday, Highway 401 westbound was closed in the London area due to multiple collisions and rollovers. It opened late Monday but both highways 401 and 402 continue to be very slow going.

On Tuesday, the city came extremely close to declaring a state of emergency. Schools and public transit have been canceled for 3 days straight (Monday-Wednesday) and non-essential government services have been closed. Many public businesses closed up shop too as the city came to a standstill. London has asked surrounding cities for help.

The video shows just how suddenly changes to the weather can occur here. At the end of the video my camera tripod fell off the dashboard as I navigated a curve because it wasn't well secured. I didn't crash lol.

We could get another 20-40cm by the end of Wednesday. Winter doesn't officially start until Dec 21.
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Old December 8th, 2010, 04:04 AM   #1859
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Haljackey View Post
Most of the sections of the 400-Series highways have a design speed of 130km/h. That's why most people want to drive close to this speed. Posting it 30km/h below is not just too slow, it's almost dangerous.


--------------------------------------------------------------


Anyways, I'm not sure if many of you know what's been going on in London, Ontario, but we've received about 100cm of snow. The city is practically shut down.

I took this video of Highway 402 and 401 eastbound on Friday, December 3, just as the snowfall was beginning. The system lingered Saturday and intensified Sunday, dumping massive amounts of snow on the area mostly through 'snow squalls'.



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHNKzl9uV3A


On Sunday, Highway 401 westbound was closed in the London area due to multiple collisions and rollovers. It opened late Monday but both highways 401 and 402 continue to be very slow going.

On Tuesday, the city came extremely close to declaring a state of emergency. Schools and public transit have been canceled for 3 days straight (Monday-Wednesday) and non-essential government services have been closed. Many public businesses closed up shop too as the city came to a standstill. London has asked surrounding cities for help.

The video shows just how suddenly changes to the weather can occur here. At the end of the video my camera tripod fell off the dashboard as I navigated a curve because it wasn't well secured. I didn't crash lol.

We could get another 20-40cm by the end of Wednesday. Winter doesn't officially start until Dec 21.
Whoa! Um, can't quite get my head around 100 cm - 40 inches?
Buffalo and points south got something like that about the same time. It's attributed to the "lake effect." Is London's because you're downwind of Lake Huron? (Actually, lake-effect snow is more likely to happen in late fall than deep into the winter, because it's dependent on open water for the air to draw moisture from; doesn't happen once the lakes freeze.)
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Old December 10th, 2010, 10:19 PM   #1860
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I just love the Canada, what a beautiful country
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