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Old January 31st, 2010, 06:12 PM   #2521
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Originally Posted by goschio View Post
But on the autobahn it basically means acceleration and joy. No general speed limit. That is what most people care about.
http://www.gettingaroundgermany.info...ml#speedlimits
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Old January 31st, 2010, 06:20 PM   #2522
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^
Yes, that is what I said. No general speed limit.
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Old January 31st, 2010, 06:25 PM   #2523
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Yep. This sign says there is no speed limit, but only if it is installed on an Autobahn and no other speed limit is posted at the same time.

If you see this sign on another road that is not an Autobahn or Autobahähnliche Straße, the general speed limit applies, which is generally 100 km/h outside city limits and 50 km/h within.
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Old January 31st, 2010, 06:45 PM   #2524
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Basically, sign below means: end of speed limit




Previously posted sign, might cancel various restriction, and can be put after signs "no left turn" and "overtaking prohibited" stuck together, in the extra urban area with no additional speed limit signs applied.

Last edited by piotr71; January 31st, 2010 at 09:28 PM.
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Old January 31st, 2010, 09:15 PM   #2525
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ChrisZwolle's description is most accurate. The sign means that the speed limit is switching to the default speed limit for that type of road. It only means no speed limit on autobahn, because by default speed is not restricted on autobahns. On other roads it doesn't mean "no speed restrictions" at all!
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Old January 31st, 2010, 09:19 PM   #2526
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Wow, Verona already signed in Deutschland!
True. And no signage of Germany around Verona.
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Old January 31st, 2010, 09:38 PM   #2527
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I must say that the A38 is a wonderful highway, the best one on my frequent trips from the Netherlands to the Czech Republic and back. Now that it's complete, it is a really fast connection. But I always wonder why there is still so little traffic on it. Maybe it's connected to the population density in the area. Or the highway connects less important destinations than the A4, for example. It is also possible that there are some restrictions for trucks, I have seen some signs at the western end of the highway that could suggest it. Does anyone have a clue about this?
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Old January 31st, 2010, 10:24 PM   #2528
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Originally Posted by Tramfreak View Post
I must say that the A38 is a wonderful highway, the best one on my frequent trips from the Netherlands to the Czech Republic and back. Now that it's complete, it is a really fast connection. But I always wonder why there is still so little traffic on it. Maybe it's connected to the population density in the area. Or the highway connects less important destinations than the A4, for example. It is also possible that there are some restrictions for trucks, I have seen some signs at the western end of the highway that could suggest it. Does anyone have a clue about this?
I also noticed truck restricting signs along A38. First one even appears on A7 near Kassel. Similar signs are posted from the eastern end of A38. I suppose there could be 2 possible reasons:
1. New layout.
2. (more likely) One of tunnels there, does not meet safety regulations to allow lorries go through.

I used this road several times before opening new stretch and once after. Every time I had driven there it was amazingly clear of vehicles. Only once, I saw something exceptional. At 3am going east, on the north carriageway, there were hundreds lorries going west. Although, side of the road occupied by me was utterly empty.
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Old January 31st, 2010, 10:32 PM   #2529
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It takes like 3 months for traffic to know this new route, even more for maps and GPS's to update.

Road enthusiasts may know the A38 is opened to traffic, but I doubt if the average traveler/trucker knows it as well. The A38 shortens the route from the Ruhr area to southern Poland by 30 kilometers. That is 10 liters of diesel for a truck, but more important, the A38 is flatter than the A7 and A4 between Kassel and Eisenach. However, A7 is also very hilly between Kassel and Göttingen.
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Old January 31st, 2010, 10:58 PM   #2530
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It takes like 3 months for traffic to know this new route, even more for maps and GPS's to update.

Road enthusiasts may know the A38 is opened to traffic, but I doubt if the average traveler/trucker knows it as well. The A38 shortens the route from the Ruhr area to southern Poland by 30 kilometers. That is 10 liters of diesel for a truck, but more important, the A38 is flatter than the A7 and A4 between Kassel and Eisenach. However, A7 is also very hilly between Kassel and Göttingen.
I started using the A38 when Breitenworbis-Bleicherode section wasn't finished and when there was another gap around Halle. Even at that time, the route was a bit faster and much less stressful than the A4.

Actually, the traffic got unbearable on many alternative routes over time. I first used A61/A3/A6 to get from Venlo (NL) to Rozvadov (CZ) but they started building a strange tunnel around one of the villages and the traffic jams there were just too long and frequent. Then I used A61/A6 for several years, but the the section Heilbronn-Heidelberg was disastrous every time. I tried the A4 a few times (also to avoid having to drive through Prague), but as soon as I found out about A38, I tried it out and it was much better. Now the only thing I still have to figure out is how to get around the Ruhr area onto the A44 in the best way.
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Old January 31st, 2010, 11:04 PM   #2531
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Now the only thing I still have to figure out is how to get around the Ruhr area onto the A44 in the best way.
I normally drove A40 and B1 from Venlo, but only in weekends and nights. It is really drivable then.
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Old January 31st, 2010, 11:05 PM   #2532
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You can't avoid the Ruhr Area if you're coming from Eindhoven, unless you want to take a serious detour. All in all, the A40-A3-A2-A1-A44 is the best route, traffic volumes are equal to the other east-westroutes, but A2 is 2x3 continuously and is less congested than A40 or A42.

If you're coming from an area north of the line Amsterdam - Enschede, you can use B54-A1-A44 via Münster or A30-A33-A44 via Bielefeld. I usually recommend the first route since it's completely grade-separated.
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Old February 1st, 2010, 12:12 AM   #2533
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
You can't avoid the Ruhr Area if you're coming from Eindhoven, unless you want to take a serious detour. All in all, the A40-A3-A2-A1-A44 is the best route, traffic volumes are equal to the other east-westroutes, but A2 is 2x3 continuously and is less congested than A40 or A42.
Instead of the A 1 one can take the short cut that the B 236 provides between the A 2 and the A 44.
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Old February 1st, 2010, 01:14 AM   #2534
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Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
If you're coming from an area north of the line Amsterdam - Enschede, you can use B54-A1-A44 via Münster or A30-A33-A44 via Bielefeld. I usually recommend the first route since it's completely grade-separated.
Not yet, there is one traffic light near Glanerburg and near Steinfurt the grade-separated B54 hasn't been finished yet
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Old February 1st, 2010, 10:13 PM   #2535
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I joined Pansori in this trip across the Alps, Southern Germany and Austria, and I must say that as much as I was impressed by German driving culture on autobahns, I was pretty appalled by German driving culture in the Alps. Literally about 50% of the cars in Italian Alps coming from opposite direction where the road was curving had two wheels on our side of the road (most had "D" number plates). What's up with that? It was very annoying.
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Old February 1st, 2010, 10:49 PM   #2536
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Originally Posted by bleetz View Post
I joined Pansori in this trip across the Alps, Southern Germany and Austria, and I must say that as much as I was impressed by German driving culture on autobahns, I was pretty appalled by German driving culture in the Alps. Literally about 50% of the cars in Italian Alps coming from opposite direction where the road was curving had two wheels on our side of the road (most had "D" number plates). What's up with that? It was very annoying.
I will just add that this was mostly obvious with cars in the outer radius. Don't know if that changes anything though. Perhaps those who drive more in the mountains could explain why people drive like that.
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Old February 2nd, 2010, 12:09 AM   #2537
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In my experience (living almost in the Alps) especially lots of people from Northern Germany (and other regions like the Netherlands, etc.) can't drive on mountain roads apparently. They aren't used to it and don't know how to to do it right (e. g. using your motor as a brake when going down a ramp instead of standing on the brake pedal, that its good behaviour to give the one who goes up the right of way on narrow roads, that you don't cut in u-turns when not necessary or to wait and sign with the horn if you want to do so, etc.).

There's absolutely no argument for cutting on the outer radius (of course sometimes you have to do so on the inner radius in narrow turns), but you have to stay on your side or wait when there's someone on the other lane. However, it's not uncommon to drive somewhat to the middle of the road, especially on narrow pass roads with inappropriate crash barriers on the outer side (where you could fall down). In winter (snow covered or icy roads) you can cut left turns to have more space to run out to the right if you should loose control over the car (of course, only when you can see that there's no oncoming traffic).

Especially in winter people (well, let's face it, tourists) tend to drive very carefully in the Alps because they fear that the road might get icy every moment - even when its dust-dry.
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Old February 2nd, 2010, 10:41 AM   #2538
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replace northern Germans with southern Italians (from the Po plain to sicily): it is the same thing on the roads of the italian alps.
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Old February 2nd, 2010, 10:53 AM   #2539
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(e. g. using your motor as a brake when going down a ramp instead of standing on the brake pedal
Yeah, a lot of Dutchmen don't know that. We have a quite long ramp in the parking garage in my shopping center, I can just let it in 2nd gear and roll down, but most people step on the brake the whole way down. I saw this a lot in Switzerland too.
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Old February 2nd, 2010, 12:20 PM   #2540
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And on long ramps doing so you'll burn the brake covering. On some summer days you can even smell that at the foot of the steeper passes.
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