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Old August 15th, 2015, 11:50 PM   #3221
ChrisZwolle
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Hmm, I traveled through the western side of Paris this summer and I didn't notice it to be particularly bad. The markings are a bit faded sometimes, but I haven't seen them totally faded. I try to avoid the eastern side of Paris as it tend to be more congested.

I've also driven N10 between Bordeaux and Poitiers, it was fine by me. Not autoroute-standard, but decent pavement and nearly completely grade-separated. Only the rest areas are substandard for long-distance travel.
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Old August 16th, 2015, 03:47 AM   #3222
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Me neither. This time for crossing Paris I've choosen the BP, and out of the working area in the Quai d'Ivry interchange, it was as funny as usual. That's true that I've notice an absolutely lack of lighting on the tunnel on the A3 in Bagnolet.

About the state of roads, the same as usual. No big changes. That's true that when I don't want to use tolled motorways between Paris and the Basque Country lately I prefer to use the N20 between Paris and Vierzon, then the A20 to Limoges, and finally joining the N10 in Angoulême from the N141.
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Old August 16th, 2015, 10:30 AM   #3223
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Reivajar View Post
Me neither. This time for crossing Paris I've choosen the BP, and out of the working area in the Quai d'Ivry interchange, it was as funny as usual. That's true that I've notice an absolutely lack of lighting on the tunnel on the A3 in Bagnolet
.
In the tunnels there MUST be lighting. The motorway administrator should fix this problem.
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Old August 21st, 2015, 02:55 AM   #3224
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A1 Paris - Ch. de Gaulle Airport Terminal 2E

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Old August 29th, 2015, 05:15 PM   #3225
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FR / Paris Ch. de Gaulle Airport / Driveway to T1 T2 T3

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Old August 29th, 2015, 05:34 PM   #3226
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N10 Bordeaux - Angoulême - Poitiers

I took 127 photos of N10 between Bordeaux and Poitiers. It is a very good alternative to tolled A10 (in fact it is even shorter). There is one two-lane section and a few stretches with at-grade intersections, but no traffic lights or roundabouts.

You can view the entire album: https://www.flickr.com/photos/chrisz...57657221128549

Some highlights:

1. N10 branching off A10 just north of Bordeaux.

N10-1 by European Roads, on Flickr

2. The typical layout of N10: a voie express with 110 km/h speed limit.

N10-12 by European Roads, on Flickr

3. Angoulême is the major city between Bordeaux en Poitiers. Of course there are more Dutch on the road.

N10-14 by European Roads, on Flickr

4. There is one segment with a single carriageway between Bordeaux and Angoulême. Upgrade is ongoing, but appears slow.

N10-25 by European Roads, on Flickr

5.

N10-28 by European Roads, on Flickr

6. Exit to Cognac.

N10-30 by European Roads, on Flickr

7. Some gently rolling hills. Don't expect much fantastic scenery in western France, it's mostly fairly flat.

N10-37 by European Roads, on Flickr

8. One of two dozen Châteaneufs in France.

N10-41 by European Roads, on Flickr

9. Closing in on Angoulême.

N10-45 by European Roads, on Flickr

10. We cross the new high-speed rail to Bordeaux. It is nearly completed.

N10-48 by European Roads, on Flickr

11. D1000 is the beltway of Angoulême, but it is not a high-standard road.

N10-55 by European Roads, on Flickr

12. Funny, three cities in different directions, nearly the same distance away.

N10-56 by European Roads, on Flickr

13. Interchange to N141, an east-west route nationale. This segment is a city street, a new bypass is partially completed further north.

N10-59 by European Roads, on Flickr

14. This is the future N141. Apparently numbered as N1141, but not signed as such from N10.

N10-60 by European Roads, on Flickr

15. Montluçon is a small city of 40,000, but signed from hours away throughout central France (presumably due to a lack of better control cities).

N10-61 by European Roads, on Flickr

16. Leaving Angoulême.

N10-64 by European Roads, on Flickr

17. New pavement. The pavement on toll-free N10 is generally adequate. Not as excellent as the toll roads though, but nothing to complain about.

N10-71 by European Roads, on Flickr

18. Several intersections.

N10-76 by European Roads, on Flickr

19. There are many passing bans for trucks and some stretches are limited to 80 km/h for trucks (as opposed to the regular 90 km/h).

N10-78 by European Roads, on Flickr

20. This looks like a twinned section of the former two-lane road.

N10-82 by European Roads, on Flickr

21. Caution, supermarkets next 5 km.

N10-86 by European Roads, on Flickr

22. Left exit, at-grade. I haven't seen this before in France.

N10-87 by European Roads, on Flickr

23.

N10-89 by European Roads, on Flickr

24. Ruffec, a town with 3 exits.

N10-92 by European Roads, on Flickr

25. There are some slight hills on this part of N10. Not quite spectacular but it breaks the monotony of western France.

N10-97 by European Roads, on Flickr

26. Brux

N10-105 by European Roads, on Flickr

27. Rogue exit number.

N10-109 by European Roads, on Flickr

28. Closing in on Poitiers.

N10-115 by European Roads, on Flickr

29. Some more intersections.

N10-116 by European Roads, on Flickr

30. One of the many tax gantries of the never implemented tax on heavy goods vehicles. Hundreds have been installed at € 1 million each.

N10-123 by European Roads, on Flickr

31. Approaching the A10 interchange at Poitiers-Sud. I took A10 from here on to Paris.

N10-127 by European Roads, on Flickr
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Old August 30th, 2015, 09:04 PM   #3227
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That looks like a nice alternate route to A10. North of Poitiers it's still a very high-standard road (though no longer called N10), but it crosses villages and there are many roundabouts and traffic lights. I guess you can achieve a reasonably high average anyway. A10 is a rip-off -tolls are very high and there's the goddamn gendarmes with tripods and binocles everywhere.
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Old August 30th, 2015, 11:24 PM   #3228
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
21. Caution, supermarkets next 5 km.


Now seriously, I read somewhere that supermarket chain got its name because the first one ever was at a road junction or carrefour near Annecy.
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Old August 30th, 2015, 11:38 PM   #3229
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That looks like a nice alternate route to A10. North of Poitiers it's still a very high-standard road (though no longer called N10), but it crosses villages and there are many roundabouts and traffic lights. I guess you can achieve a reasonably high average anyway. A10 is a rip-off -tolls are very high and there's the goddamn gendarmes with tripods and binocles everywhere.
From my experience... around 70-75 km/h as average... :S
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Old August 31st, 2015, 10:40 AM   #3230
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I use the N10 on my way to Portugal and back.
It isn´t as confortable as the A10, the pavement is not as regular as on the Autoroute, but it is for free.
It is shorter as the stretch of the A10, and fuel is cheaper.
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Old September 8th, 2015, 08:22 PM   #3231
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I was in Southeastern France last weekend and noticed quite a lot of stuff going on in the roads I drove:

- A9 is already 3+3 between Le Boulou and Perpignan. The website says this is only a temporary configuration (with a 110 km/h speed limit) for the summer, and that the motorway will soon be reverted to 2+2 to allow for the works to end in late 2016. This is quite a long construction time by the way, because most works are finished and only the final asphalt layer is remaining. Anyway, it was nice to drive without having to disengage cruise control almost never between Le Boulou (which is almost in Spain) and Montpellier

- Construction for A9b in Montpellier is well underway. Almost the whole motorway is a big construction site, except for the stretch where the new roadway will be far from the existing one. Most underpasses are being widened and new interchanges are U/C. Speed limit is 90 km/h all the way, including the stretch where there are no works, so it looked to me like the speed camera that stands there will pay a part of this project.

- Another new (for me) construction site is the L2/A7 interchange in Marseille (website). This stretch of Marseille's ringroad hadn't started construction when I was last there in mid 2014, and now works are very advanced -which means they are hurrying up to get it ready on time. This is the only stretch of L2 that didn't start construction in the 1990s like the rest of the road.

- Last but not least, there's also Miramas bypass that's taking shape. This (which is the remaining section of a partially-built bypass) will be built as a dual-carriageway road, as there are plans to upgrade the RN569/1569 to this standard in the future.

I really appreciate that road projects in France have their own website. This isn't standard procedure in Spain, where you have to rely on the short press releases from Fomento (which is a best-case scenario -regional governments release even more sparse information) and the actual projects are harder to find. Even if this increases construction costs, it's a great move for the sake of transparency.
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Old September 9th, 2015, 01:10 PM   #3232
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Driving through Île-de-France (France) from Saint-Denis to Goussainville 17.08.2015 Timelapse x4

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Old September 11th, 2015, 03:53 PM   #3233
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Driving from Paris to Roye (France) 17.08.2015 Timelapse x4

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Old September 12th, 2015, 08:56 PM   #3234
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diesel

I drove a couple thousand kilometers through France last week. I've been paying attention to the cars due to the recent diesel pollution discussion.

On the autoroute there are almost no old cars. Most cars are recent models. However, in rural areas / villages and in cities you'll see a lot (more than in other countries) old diesel cars. Both passenger cars, delivery vans and light trucks that are 20 - 30 years old. You can smell it driving behind them. Sometimes there's just thick black smoke coming out of them when they accelerate.

Some of them are nice though, like a Peugeot 505 GTD. 1980s Peugeots are long gone from the streetscape in the Netherlands, save for perhaps an occassional Peugeot 205.

The amount of old diesel cars in France appears to be much higher than in other countries. Given the fact that 20 year old diesel cars pollute as much as 100 times more than a recent model diesel car, I can see why they want to outlaw them. Even if the share of 20+ year old diesel cars may be under 10%, they could be responsible for something like 80+% of diesel emissions.

They had the same discussion recently in the Netherlands, when the city of Utrecht introduced an environmental zone (much like in Germany). A few thousand pre-2000 diesel cars emitted as much as a hundred thousand recent model diesel cars. So even if you ban only a small share of total passenger cars, it has a major impact on reducing emissions.

I'm not sure which tools France has at its disposal to ban / phase out old diesel cars. It's obvious they aren't being phased out as fast as in other countries through natural cycles. But there is no road tax in France, so that's not an incentive the government can use. That leaves environmental zones and maybe a subsidized 'vehicle retirement program' to scrap them in exchange for some cash to buy a new(er) car.
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Old September 12th, 2015, 10:55 PM   #3235
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Considering that the car of choice for every French new driver has been the ubiquitous Peugeot 106 D/Citroën Saxo 1.5D/Renault Clio dCi for many years, and that many of these people have kept these cars because they are very reliable and cheap to run, phasing out all these pre-2000 cars will be extremely difficult, and painful. France having scrapped the "vignette" (road tax) 20 years ago doesn't certainly help.

I'm a bit skeptical about new cars being that nice and clean though. I've read that their "big" (PM10) particle emissions are indeed much lower, but instead they emit big quantities of smaller particles that can penetrate skin tissue more easily and thus cause diseases such as lung cancer. This also applies to new patrol engines, as direct injection systems such as Volkswagen's TSI do also emit small particles.
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Old September 13th, 2015, 02:49 AM   #3236
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisZwolle View Post
The amount of old diesel cars in France appears to be much higher than in other countries. Given the fact that 20 year old diesel cars pollute as much as 100 times more than a recent model diesel car, I can see why they want to outlaw them. Even if the share of 20+ year old diesel cars may be under 10%, they could be responsible for something like 80+% of diesel emissions.
Once again, it depends what you are considering... if you are only talking about particles, yes, this is true. If you are talking about nitrogen monoxides, this false, recent diesel cars are polluting more...

So if we do the sum, the result is not that much evident... at least governments and car builders should stop ignoring nitrogen monoxides, this is the next big serious health public disaster linked to cars...
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Old September 13th, 2015, 03:24 AM   #3237
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why get rid of the old cars?
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Old September 13th, 2015, 09:36 AM   #3238
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If you are talking about nitrogen monoxides, this false, recent diesel cars are polluting more...
While recent diesel cars do pollute more NOx than the Euro emission standards mandate, they are still cleaner than 20+ year old diesel cars.

Diesel cars only meet NOx emission standards on dynamometers. Real-life usage emissions are several times higher. However, it should be noted Euro 3 norms allow over 6 times higher emission of NOx than Euro 6. So in reality, Euro 6 diesel cars in practice meet Euro 3/4 standards.

This is the same kind of fraud like CO2 emissions / fuel consumption which abuse the system by systematically reporting completely unattainable fuel economy, resulting in lower taxes.
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Old September 13th, 2015, 12:24 PM   #3239
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While recent diesel cars do pollute more NOx than the Euro emission standards mandate, they are still cleaner than 20+ year old diesel cars.

Diesel cars only meet NOx emission standards on dynamometers. Real-life usage emissions are several times higher. However, it should be noted Euro 3 norms allow over 6 times higher emission of NOx than Euro 6. So in reality, Euro 6 diesel cars in practice meet Euro 3/4 standards.

This is the same kind of fraud like CO2 emissions / fuel consumption which abuse the system by systematically reporting completely unattainable fuel economy, resulting in lower taxes.
Exactly!
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Old September 14th, 2015, 02:10 PM   #3240
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A stretch of A75 near Lodève has been damaged after more than 300 mm of rain fell within a few hours.

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